World Cup 2.3: Dubov, Hammer qualify in tiebreaks

8/16/2013 – 17-year-old Daniil Dubov went all the way against former FIDE world champion Ruslan Ponomariov, with eight draws and then a stunning victory in the Armageddon (Daniil actually played 1.b3??!). The Norwegians cheered as Jon Ludwig took down the much higher rated David Navara. The top seeds all went through in two rapid chess tiebreak games. Tiebreak report with pictures.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

The FIDE World Cup is a knockout, starting with 128 players, with two games (90 min for 40 moves + 30 min for the rest, with 30 seconds increment) between pairs of players. The tiebreaks consist of two rapid games (25 min + 10 sec), then two accelerated games (10 min + 10 sec), and finally an Armageddon. The winner and the runner-up of the World Cup 2013 will qualify for the Candidates Tournament of the next World Championship cycle. The venue is the city of Tromsø, which lies in the northern-most region of Norway, almost 400 km inside the Arctic Circle. You can find all details and links to many ChessBase articles on Tromsø here. The World Cup starts on Sunday, August 11th and lasts until September 3rd (tiebreaks, closing ceremony). Each round lasts three days, while the final will consist of four classical games. Thursday August 29 is a free day. A detailed schedule can be found here.

There were fifteen matches that went into the playoffs. Most were decided in the two 25-minute rapid games, with Levon Aronian, Vladimir Kramnik, Sergey Karjakin, Gata Kamsky and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov going through – and eliminating respectively Igor Lysyj, Mikhail Kobalia, Krishnan Sasikiran, Aleksandr Shimanov and Maxim Matlakov. Alexey Dreev knocked out the nominally stronger Wang Hao, while Peter Svidler eliminated Viktor Bologan.

The shock eliminations were Michael Adams, Etienne Bacrot, David Navara, Ruslan Ponomariov and, as mentioned, Wang Hao, who all fell to lower rated players: Adams to Yuriy Kryvoruchko, Bacrot to Alexander Moiseenko, Navara to local GM Jon Ludvig Hammer, and Ponomariov, as we shall see belo, to Daniil Dubov in the final Armageddon game. Teimour Radjabov eliminated Lazaro Bruzon in the accelerated 10m + 10s games.

Results of the second round tiebreak

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Aronian, Levon 2813
½
½
½
1
          2.5
Lysyj, Igor 2648
½
½
½
0
          1.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Kramnik, Vladimir 2784
½
½
½
1
          2.5
Kobalia, Mikhail 2651
½
½
½
0
          1.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Karjakin, Sergey 2772
½
½
1
½
          2.5
Sasikiran, Krishnan 2660
½
½
0
½
          1.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Kamsky, Gata 2741
1
0
1
1
          3.0
Shimanov, Aleksandr 2655
0
1
0
0
          1.0
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Mamedyarov, S. 2775
½
½
½
1
          2.5
Matlakov, Maxim 2676
½
½
½
0
          1.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Ponomariov, Ruslan 2756
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
0
4.0
Dubov, Daniil 2624
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
1
5.0
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Wang, Hao 2747
½
½
0
0
          1.0
Dreev, Aleksey 2668
½
½
1
1
          3.0
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Svidler, Peter 2746
½
½
½
1
          2.5
Bologan, Viktor 2672
½
½
½
0
          1.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Adams, Michael 2740
½
½
½
0
          1.5
Kryvoruchko, Y. 2678
½
½
½
1
          2.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Radjabov, Teimour 2733
½
½
½
½
1
1
      4.0
Bruzon, Lazaro 2698
½
½
½
½
0
0
      2.0
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Korobov, Anton 2720
1
0
1
1
          3.0
Jobava, Baadur 2696
0
1
0
0
          1.0
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Navara, David 2715
½
½
0
0
          1.5
Hammer, Jon L. 2605
½
½
1
1
          2.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Bacrot, Etienne 2714
½
½
0
½
          1.5
Moiseenko, Alex. 2699
½
½
1
½
          2.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Vallejo, Francisco 2706
½
½
½
0
          1.5
Le, Quang Liem 2702
½
½
½
1
          2.5
Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Fressinet, Laurent 2708
½
½
0
0
          1.0
Malakhov, Vladimir 2707
½
½
1
1
          3.0

Levon Aronian did not have any problems with Igor Lysyj, simply outplaying the Russian GM

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Aronian, Levon 2813
½
½
½
1
2.5
Lysyj, Igor 2648
½
½
½
0
1.5

Just like Aronian Vladimir Kramnik won the second rapid game with white

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Kramnik, Vladimir 2784
½
½
½
1
2.5
Kobalia, Mikhail 2651
½
½
½
0
1.5

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Karjakin, Sergey 2772
½
½
1
½
2.5
Sasikiran, Krishnan 2660
½
½
0
½
1.5

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Kamsky, Gata 2741
1
0
1
1
3.0
Shimanov, Aleksandr 2655
0
1
0
0
1.0

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Svidler, Peter 2746
½
½
½
1
2.5
Bologan, Viktor 2672
½
½
½
0
1.5

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Mamedyarov, S. 2775
½
½
½
1
2.5
Matlakov, Maxim 2676
½
½
½
0
1.5

Alexey Dreev is a fearsome rapid player, as Wang Hao found out in this tiebreak match

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Wang, Hao 2747
½
½
0
0
1.0
Dreev, Aleksey 2668
½
½
1
1
3.0

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Navara, David 2715
½
½
0
0
1.5
Hammer, Jon Lud. 2605
½
½
1
1
2.5

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Bacrot, Etienne 2714
½
½
0
½
1.5
Moiseenko, Alex. 2699
½
½
1
½
2.5

Michael Adams had clear chances against Yuriy Kryvoruchko in the first game, but drew
it and then got into trouble in the second. Kryvoruchko progressed to round three.

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Adams, Michael 2740
½
½
½
0
1.5
Kryvoruchko, Yuriy 2678
½
½
½
1
2.5

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Korobov, Anton 2720
1
0
1
1
3.0
Jobava, Baadur 2696
0
1
0
0
1.0

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Fressinet, Laurent 2708
½
½
0
0
1.0
Malakhov, Vladimir 2707
½
½
1
1
3.0

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 Pts
Vallejo, Francisco 2706
½
½
½
0
1.5
Le, Quang Liem 2702
½
½
½
1
2.5

Teimour Radjabov did not have an easy time with Cuban GM Lazaro Bruzon, missing a clear win in the first game and taking a quick draw in the second. Then in the two accelerated games he simply mowed down his opponent. Radjabov revealed in an interview with Susan Polgar and Lawrence Trent that he has a month-old daughter – we have to assume that becoming a father may have distracted his chess career in the past few months.

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 Pts
Radjabov, Teimour 2733
½
½
½
½
1
1
4.0
Bruzon, Lazaro 2698
½
½
½
½
0
0
2.0

The final Armageddon game

1.b3??! came as a suprise to the spectators, but Ponomariov replied instantly

Susan Polgar and Lawrence Trent commenting on the Armageddon Daniil Dubov vs Ruslan Ponomariov

[Event "FIDE World Cup 2013"] [Site "Tromso NOR"] [Date "2013.08.16"] [Round "2.11"] [White "Dubov, Daniil"] [Black "Ponomariov, Ruslan"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A01"] [PlyCount "95"] [EventDate "2013.08.11"] {Larsen's Opening, also called the Nimzowitsch-Larsen Attack or Queen's Fianchetto Opening. The move 1.b3 prepares to fianchetto the queen's bishop where it will help control the central squares in hypermodern fashion and put pressure on Black's kingside. The b2-bishop is often a source of recurring irritation for Black, who should not treat it lightly.} 1. b3 e5 { Astonishingly Ponomariov hardly batted an eyelid and immediately played this reply.} 2. Bb2 Nc6 3. e3 Nf6 4. c4 g6 5. Nf3 d6 6. d3 Bg7 7. Nbd2 O-O 8. Be2 Re8 9. a3 Ne7 $146 10. b4 b6 11. O-O Bb7 12. Rc1 c5 13. Qc2 Qc7 14. Ng5 h6 15. Nge4 Nxe4 16. Nxe4 Bxe4 17. dxe4 Nc6 18. Bc3 cxb4 19. axb4 a5 20. b5 Nd8 21. Rfd1 Ne6 22. Rd5 Nc5 23. Rcd1 Bf8 24. Bb2 h5 25. f4 exf4 26. Qc3 f6 $2 (26... Re5 {was the move that kept the position in balance for Black.}) 27. Qxf6 Qg7 28. Rxd6 $1 Qxf6 (28... Bxd6 29. Qxg7#) 29. Rxf6 Re6 30. e5 Rxf6 31. exf6 fxe3 32. Bf3 Re8 33. Kf1 $1 {Lawrence Trent: "Black's position is smellier that some of my socks."} Kf7 34. Ke2 a4 35. Bc6 Rc8 36. Bd5+ Ke8 37. Kxe3 {White is clearly on a path to victory, but he has 1 min 28 seconds left to pull it off.} Bh6+ 38. Kf3 Kf8 39. Be5 Rd8 40. Bc7 Rd7 41. Bxb6 Nb3 42. Rd3 {White is two pawns up and has everything going for him - except the 46 seconds left on his clock. Remember, he has to win, while Black can be totally lost and simply play on time.} Bg5 (42... Rd6 {and ...Rxf6 had to be considered.}) 43. f7 Be7 44. Re3 Rd6 45. Bc7 Rd7 46. Bf4 Kg7 $2 47. Rxe7 $1 Nd4+ 48. Kf2 (48. Kf2 Rxe7 49. Bh6+ Kxh6 50. f8=Q+ {with mate to follow.}) 1-0

Ruslan Ponomariov (right) resigns, young Daniil Dubov is through to round three

Player Rtg G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 G9 Pts
Ponomariov, Ruslan 2756
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
0
4.0
Dubov, Daniil 2624
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
½
1
5.0

Pictures provided by Paul Truong in Tromsø

Replay all games of the round

Select games from the dropdown menu above the board

Video reports from Tromsø


Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


Topics Tromso, World Cup
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register