Master Class Garry Kasparov

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Fritz 15 - English Version

New Fritz, new friend

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How to exchange pieces

Learn to master the right exchange! Let the German WGM Elisabeth Pähtz show you how to gain a strategic winning position by exchanging pieces of equal value or to safely convert material advantage into a win.

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Master Class Vol.7: Garry Kasparov

On this DVD a team of experts gets to the bottom of Kasparov’s play. In over 8 hours of video running time the authors Rogozenko, Marin, Reeh and Müller cast light on four important aspects of Kasparov’s play: opening, strategy, tactics and endgame.

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ChessBase Magazine Extra 173

A solid concept against Benoni: Learn from GM Pert how to win with the Fianchetto Variation (video). Classics put to test: Robert Ris shows Fischer-Kholmov (1965) with an impressive knight sacrifice by the Russian (video). Plus 44,889 new games.

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Pawn structures you should know

Every pawn structure has its typical plans and to know these plans helps you to find your way in these positions. On this DVD Mikhalchishin presents and explains the most common central structures: The Hedgehog, the Maroczy, Hanging pawns and the Isolani.

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Trompowsky for the attacking player

Tap into your creative mind and start the game on a fresh note. The Trompowsky (1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5) is an opening outside of conventional wisdom. Create challenges and make your opponent solve problems early on.

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The 4...Nf6 Caro-Kann

On this DVD Nigel Davies examines both the Bronstein-Larsen (5.Nxf6+ gxf6) and the Tartakower (5.Nxf6+ exf6) systems and shows how the doubled f-pawn, common to both lines gives Black a range of aggressive plans and ideas.

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Books, boards, sets: Chess Niggemann

Welcome back: Kavalek in The Huffington Post

6/1/2010 – For – would you believe it? – 23 years GM Lubomir Kavalek ran a respected and widely read chess column in the Washington Post. In 2007 the award-winning column was reduced and last year terminated. Thankfully Kavalek's retirement did not last long. Now the Huffington Post has snapped him up and we can expect extensive commentary every two weeks. Here's his first submission.
Opening Encyclopedia 2016

Opening Encyclopedia 2016

In chess, braving the gap often leads to disaster after a few moves. We should be able to avoid things going so far. The ChessBase Opening Encyclopaedia offers you an effective remedy against all sorts of semi-digested knowledge and a means of building up a comprehensive and powerful repertoire.

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Chess Champ Kamsky Wins in Overtime

By GM Lubomir Kavalek

Chess is different than most other sports. A draw, not a win, is the most common result of a chess game and may even win you championships. Imagine a sporting event, in which the visiting team gets more chances to score, but when time expires and the score is tied, the championship trophy goes to a home team. Something similar happened at this year's U.S. Championship at the Chess Club and Scholastic Center in St. Louis.

In a dramatic single playoff game, GM Gata Kamsky displayed great defensive skills and won the U.S. title by drawing with the black pieces. His opponent, GM Yuri Shulman, had more time for the game, but according to the rules had to win with the white pieces. He was close, but missed several chances, allowing Kamsky to escape. "Gata had nine lives," said Shulman, expressing his frustration after the championship game.

The championship's new hybrid format was confusing, but it led to fighting chess. The $173,000 event began with seven Swiss rounds to determine four out of 24 players for the round-robin Final. It worked perfectly as the top three rated players and pre-tournament favorites, the defending U.S. champion GM Hikaru Nakamura, former world championship challenger Gata Kamsky and former U.S. champion GM Alexander Onischuk, qualified and were joined by the 2008 titleholder Yuri Shulman. Each grandmaster scored three wins, four draws and no losses.

Last Sunday was decisive in the Final Four. Onischuk turned down a draw offer and lost to Kamsky. Shulman eliminated Nakamura. It set the stage for the Kamsky-Shulman confrontation. They drew their regular game on Monday and Kamsky won the title and the $30,000 first prize the next day in the playoff.

I chose two games from the U.S. Chess Championship that have a common theme. First, both winners did something chess beginners are warned not to do: they brought their Queens out too early. Secondly, through a well thought-out positional strategy, the conquerors acquired control of the light squares and staged decisive mating attacks.

The veteran grandmaster Larry Christiansen, 53, is an attacking chess wizard who does not mind to shed material as long as he is having fun menacing his opponent's King. He strives in complicated positions and his imaginative play brought him many victories and also saved him from trouble. Gata Kamsky made a strong psychological move; he turned the tables around and played like Christiansen, sacrificing pawns and attacking relentlessly. Forced to his knees from the onset, Christiansen was unable to strike back. Played in the fifth round, it was Kamsky's best game overall.

Note that in the replay windows below you can click on the notation to follow the game.

Hikaru Nakamura did not prepare well against Yuri Shulman's Winawer French and was thoroughly outplayed and eliminated from the title fight. I highlight this opening as a tribute to my friend Bill Hook, a wonderful artist and the kindest of men, who died this month at age 84. He played the top board for the British Virgin Islands team at 17 chess Olympiads. In 1970 in Siegen, Germany, Hook tried his beloved queen maneuver against Bobby Fischer and easily equalized the game. He would have turned 85 this Friday.

Original column hereCopyright Huffington Post

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