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Washington Post: Winning by Rook or by Crook

11/18/2007 – It's been a banner year for cheating scandals in sports. But a couch potato's juices really start to flow when the epidemic spreads to chess. Paul Hoffman was particularly horrified that an eight-year-old participant at a children's championship was accused of receiving illicit help. The journalist, author and chess aficionado vents his frustration in today's Washington Post op ed piece.
 

Winning by Rook or by Crook

By Paul Hoffman

Sunday, November 18, 2007; Page B02

Chess, I'd always thought, is an ennobling cerebral contest between two determined players armed only with their intellect and free of all drugs, except perhaps caffeine. So you can understand my chagrin when Azerbaijani adults attending the European Union children's championship last month accused the 8-year-old Russian winner of receiving illicit help from a third party during the game. Tournament organizers ultimately rejected the allegations and berated the adults for smearing the child's good name.

But his was not the only indignity the royal game endured recently. The gentlemen's-club respectability that chess once enjoyed was flushed away last autumn at the 2006 World Chess Championship when Bulgarian contender Veselin Topalov accused the reigning champion, Vladimir Kramnik, of making a suspicious 50 trips to the bathroom during a single game. The implication: that Kramnik was secretly consulting chess-playing software on a Palm Pilot or talking on his cellphone to a confederate armed with a chess computer. Officials hastily boarded up his private loo. "I had to go to the bathroom urgently," Kramnik said later. "I asked the arbiter to open my toilet. He just shrugged and offered me an empty coffee cup."

The charges looked too much like an underhanded attempt by Topalov to rattle the taciturn Kramnik, who was forced to explain his hydration and evacuation habits to a prying press corps, and the International Chess Federation ultimately decided that they were spurious. Nonetheless, organizers of future tournaments are now debating whether they should herd grandmasters -- the black belts of the chessboard -- through metal detectors and all but strip-search them before a match. Already, playing halls have been bombarded with electromagnetic signals to jam secret wireless communications.

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