US Championship: So and Naka score

3/30/2017 – The US Championship has started, and it brings three of the world's Top Ten, including Wesley So, Fabiano Caruana, and Hikaru Nakamura among others. While So defeated Shabalov in a fairly one-sided game, Nakamura overcame Robson with ease. In the women's event, Abrahamyan won well, while Zatonskih blundered into a mate. Report and analysis by Alexander Yermolinsky.

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By Alexander Yermolinsky

All photos by Lennart Ootes

Same time and same place for the 2017 edition of the United States Chess Championships. Springtime in St. Louis, Missouri. The Chess Club and Scholastic Center on Maryland Avenue resides among posh restaurants and boutique shops, and we have the same faces of the organizers and commentators, as well as the general chess hanger-ons in the crowd.

All seems the same, but look where we are now. The U.S. boasts the world's no. 2, no. 3 and no. 6 in Wesley So, Fabiano Caruana and  Hikaru Nakamura; last year we won a Chess Olympiad, and Jeffery Xiong crushed through the field at the World Juniors. Things are looking up for U.S. Chess like never before.

This year's Championship is laced with intrigue. Is Wesley So ready to take over as the nation's #1? Do Caruana and Nakamura have different ideas? How far behind is Xiong? Can Robson, Shankland and Naroditsky make a push into 2700 territory? Finally, is there any gas left in the tank for Kamsky and Onischuk?

Jeanne Sinquefield sounds the gong to start the round

Let's see if we can find any answers in Round One's games.

Wesley So vs Alexander Shabalov

[Event "ch-USA 2017"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2017.03.29"] [Round "1"] [White "So, W."] [Black "Shabalov, A."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D11"] [WhiteElo "2822"] [BlackElo "2556"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "57"] [EventDate "2017.03.29"] {Shabalov is the lowest seed in the field, but he earned the right to be there by virtue of winning yet another U.S. Open in 2016. King of the Opens he certainly is, Shabba is turning 50 this year, and it's getting harder and harder for him to compete with the young stars of today. The recipe of success remains the same - ultra-sharp attacking play. Question is, how to get it?} 1. c4 c6 2. Nf3 d5 3. e3 {This means Shabba won't get to play the Botvinnik Variation tonight.} Nf6 4. d4 Bg4 5. h3 Bf5 {A rare move, but often it leads to the same thing as} (5... Bh5 6. Nc3 e6 7. g4 {I'm not expert enough to discern the difference.}) 6. Nc3 e6 7. g4 Bg6 8. Ne5 Nbd7 9. Nxg6 hxg6 10. g5 $5 {The most resolute.} ({The other popular move,} 10. a3 {allows Black to play his pawn forward,} g5 {which maintains his knight on f6. The recent game Andreikin-Aronian, Tata Steel 2017 went to White's favor after} 11. Bd2 g6 12. Qf3 a6 13. Bd3 dxc4 {I'd blame this surrendering of the center for all bad things that happened to Levon in that game.} (13... Bg7 14. O-O-O Nb6 {looks more reliable.}) 14. Bxc4 b5 15. Bf1 c5 16. Bg2 Ra7 17. O-O Qb8 18. Rfd1 Be7 19. b4 $5 cxb4 20. axb4 Nb6 21. e4 {etc.}) 10... Ng8 11. h4 Ne7 12. Bd2 Nf5 { OK, the knight circled around to a nice square, and e3-e4 is now discouraged by the underprotected d4-pawn.} 13. Qg4 a6 ({I like} 13... Nb6 14. c5 Nd7 15. b4 b6 {White is not developed enough to contest the newly opening files on the Q-side, and, besides, his queen is AWOL.}) 14. O-O-O dxc4 {Once again, this plan. In many ways I understand why Shabalov chose it: true to his style he sought active play. The problem is, this typical Meran plan is supposed to liberate Bc8, which happened not to be there anymore.} ({The Chebanenko inspired} 14... b5 15. c5 {leaves Black real short of elbow room, as} e5 { accomplishes nothing but inviting White to play} 16. h5) 15. Bxc4 c5 (15... b5 16. Be2 c5 17. d5 {Black's light squares seem totally abandoned.}) 16. dxc5 { One of Wesley's great assets is his lack of fear of simplifications. He's confident he can overcome his opponents resistance in symmetrical structures, and he always does!} (16. d5 Ne5 17. Qe4 Nxc4 18. Qxc4 b5 19. Qe4 Nd6 20. Qc2 Qd7 {is tenable.}) 16... Bxc5 (16... Nxc5 17. Kb1 Qc7 {seems more harmonous, but, still, what's next?} 18. Be2 O-O-O 19. e4 Nd4 {gets busted by} 20. Nd5 $1) 17. Be2 Be7 18. Kb1 Qb6 $6 {This only helps White to unroll.} ({On the other hand,} 18... O-O 19. h5 {is suicidal}) 19. Na4 Qc7 20. Rc1 Qd6 21. Ba5 $1 Ne5 22. Qe4 Nc6 23. Rhd1 {Forceful and strong. White couldn't care less for the h4-pawn.} Rxh4 24. f4 Qb8 (24... Nxa5 {was worth trying if only because of the cute trap} 25. Rxd6 Nxd6 26. Qd4 Nc6 27. Qxg7 $2 ({White should win after} 27. Qb6) 27... Ne4 {and the queen is very short of squares.}) 25. Nb6 {This is it.} Nd6 26. Qa4 Ra7 27. Bf3 Nb5 28. Qc2 Qc7 29. Rd7 {Judging by this smooth effort Wesley So is not planning to slow down any time soon.} 1-0

Wesley So made it look easy beating an experienced fighter like Shabalov

Equally impressive was Hikaru's response.

Ray Robson vs Hikaru Nakamura

[Event "ch-USA 2017"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2017.03.29"] [Round "1"] [White "Robson, R."] [Black "Nakamura, Hi"] [Result "*"] [ECO "C65"] [WhiteElo "2668"] [BlackElo "2793"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "130"] [EventDate "2017.03.29"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. Bxc6 dxc6 6. Nbd2 Be6 7. O-O Bd6 8. d4 Nd7 9. dxe5 Nxe5 10. Nxe5 Bxe5 11. f4 Bd4+ ({Nakamura has had a look at this position from the other side of the board.} 11... Qd4+ {was played against him by Aronian. After} 12. Kh1 Bd6 13. Qe2 O-O-O {White made a thematic advance} 14. f5 {known since Lasker's win over Capablanca, St. Peterburg, 1914 . Similar positions, same idea to restrict Black's LSB.} Bd7 15. Nf3) 12. Kh1 f5 {Hikaru is well prepared as ever. Here he takes a page out of Grischuk's opening book.} (12... f6 13. Qe2 O-O 14. Nf3 Bc5 15. Be3 Qe7 { Robson-Swiercz, PRO League, 20017 ended peacefully after mere 123 moves of play, albeit Black was better most of the way through.}) 13. Qe2 ({Not much is accomplished by} 13. Qh5+ g6 14. Qe2 O-O 15. Nf3 Bf6 16. e5 Be7 { Caruana-Grischuk, London Classic 2015. Despite a good looking pawn on e5 this structure is known to be safe for Black.}) 13... O-O 14. Rd1 Qe7 15. Nf3 Bc5 16. Re1 Rae8 17. exf5 $6 {Ray wants to take a different path, but opening the position must favor the bishop pair.} Bd5 18. Ne5 Rxf5 19. c4 Be6 20. Bd2 Bd6 21. Rf1 Ref8 22. b3 Bxe5 $1 {The strength of said pair is often manifested in trading one of the bishops!} 23. fxe5 Qc5 24. Bc3 b5 25. Rxf5 Rxf5 26. Rd1 Qf2 27. Qd3 ({The endgame resulting in} 27. Qxf2 Rxf2 28. cxb5 Rc2 {is not a simple draw. The g2-pawn is a big target, while the white bishop is reduced to strictly a defensive role.} 29. Be1 cxb5 30. a4 a6 31. axb5 axb5 32. b4 c6 33. Kg1 Bd5 34. Rd2 Rc4) 27... bxc4 28. bxc4 h6 29. Bd4 Qxa2 30. Ra1 Qxc4 31. Qxc4 Bxc4 32. Bxa7 Rxe5 33. Kg1 Bd5 34. Rc1 Re2 35. Bf2 Kf7 36. h3 Ra2 37. Rc3 { Ray was in too much of a time trouble rush to look ahead and see if his fortress can be breached. Credit goes to Hikaru to seeing deeper.} g5 38. Rc1 h5 39. Rc3 Kg6 40. Rc1 Kf5 41. Rc3 g4 42. hxg4+ hxg4 {Absolute Zugzwang.} 43. Bg3 {From the first sight this move looks strange, but in truth, there was nothing better.} (43. Rd3 {surrenders the c-file:} Rc2 44. Re3 c5) (43. Kf1 { drops the g-pawn anyway:} Ra1+ 44. Be1 Bxg2+ 45. Kxg2 Rxe1 46. Rxc6 Re7 $19) ({ Other rook moves, such as} 43. Rc1 {allow} g3) 43... Rxg2+ 44. Kf1 {[#]} Rxg3 $1 {Who says technical endgame play leaves no room for flair?} (44... Rb2 45. Bxc7 Rb3 46. Rxb3 Bxb3 {was winning, but in such endings things can go wrong if White establishes a blockade.} 47. Ke2 Ke4 $1 (47... c5 $6 48. Kd3 Be6 49. Bd6 c4+ 50. Kd4 {Now in order to win Black must force the White king away from d4:} Kg5 (50... Kg6 51. Bg3 Kf7 52. Bf4 Ke7 53. Bg3 Kd7 54. Bf4 Kc6 55. Bg3 Kb5 56. Bd6 Bf7 57. Kc3 Kc6 $1 58. Bg3 Kd5 {but it's the longer road.}) 51. Bg3) 48. Bd6 Kd4 $19) 45. Rxg3 c5 {Too much distance between the pawns for White to cope with.} 46. Kf2 Kf4 47. Rd3 c6 {This little guy has an important role too - see the note to the 63rd move.} 48. Ra3 c4 49. Rc3 Be6 50. Ra3 Bf5 51. Rg3 Bd3 52. Re3 Be4 53. Ra3 (53. Rg3 Bf3 {and the c-pawn moves forward.}) 53... Bd3 54. Ra5 g3+ 55. Kg1 Be4 56. Ra3 Bd5 57. Kf1 g2+ 58. Kf2 Ke5 59. Rg3 Kd4 60. Ke2 c3 61. Kd1 Be4 62. Ke2 c2 63. Kd2 Ke5 64. Rg4 ({There it is,} 64. Rxg2 Bxg2 65. Kxc2 {is useless.}) 64... Kf5 65. Rg8 Kf4 {A flawless, business as usual, performance by Nakamura.} *

No such luck for the defending Champion Fabiano Caruana. His attempt to “mix it” against the very determined Sam “Refuse To Lose” Shankland nearly backfired.

Fabiano Caruana got into trouble in round one, but was let off the hook soon and he drew

Sam Shankland vs Fabiano Caruana

[Event "ch-USA 2017"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2017.03.29"] [Round "1"] [White "Shankland, S."] [Black "Caruana, F."] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E32"] [WhiteElo "2666"] [BlackElo "2817"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2017.03.29"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Qc2 O-O 5. Nf3 d6 6. g3 b6 7. Bg2 Bb7 8. O-O Nbd7 9. b3 Qe7 10. Bb2 Bxc3 11. Qxc3 Ne4 12. Qc2 f5 {Delayed Dutch Defense.} 13. Rad1 Rae8 (13... c5 14. Nd2 Nxd2 15. Rxd2 Bxg2 16. Kxg2 cxd4 17. Rxd4 e5 18. Rd2 Nc5 {I'm sure Fabiano was not too excited with the prospects of holding such position.}) 14. d5 $1 {Textbook play from Sam.} exd5 15. cxd5 Ndf6 16. Bxf6 Rxf6 (16... Qxf6 17. Nd4 Bxd5 18. Qxc7 {is mildly unpleasant for Black.}) 17. Rd4 Rf7 18. e3 a5 19. a3 Ba6 20. Rc1 g5 21. Rdd1 Bb7 22. Rd4 h5 $6 {A rather nervous attempt to get something out of nothing.} ({Repeating the moves with} 22... Ba6 {would be a silent draw offer with some rating points to be sacrificed. Besides, nothing stops White from trying for more with, say,} 23. b4) 23. Rc4 Bxd5 24. Rxc7 Qxc7 25. Qxc7 Rxc7 26. Rxc7 Bxb3 27. Nd4 Be6 28. Bf1 {Too straightforward.} ({A little subtlety was required:} 28. Bf3 $1 g4 ( 28... h4 $4 29. Bh5) 29. Be2 {would take care of Black's only counterplay chance of pushing f5-f4.}) 28... Kf8 29. Rb7 f4 $1 30. exf4 gxf4 31. f3 (31. Rxb6 Bf7 32. gxf4 Nd2 33. Bb5 Re1+ 34. Kg2 Nc4) 31... Nd2 32. Bb5 Bd5 {Having found a target on f3 Black is out of danger now.} 33. Rxb6 Re3 34. Rxd6 Nxf3+ 35. Kf2 Nxd4 36. Rxd5 Nxb5 37. Rxb5 1/2-1/2

Since Fabiano is facing the strongest competition in the first four rounds, including all his closest rivals, perhaps, he shouldn't be trying to force the issue this early in the tournament.

Once more the live commentator team sees IM Jennifer Shahade and GM Yasser Seirawan

Dan Naroditsky has not been playing much lately, and the same can be said about his first round opponent, the experienced Alex Onischuk. While the former has been laying down the foundation for a possible post-chess career by studying at Stamford, the latter has been busy with a full time job coaching a chess program at Texas Tech while raising three boys.

Their game, which started as a Catalan, had heated up considerably in the early middle game and promised to be a bloodbath, but somehow a quick resolution was found in perpetual check.

Alexander Onischuk vs Daniel Naroditsky

[Event "ch-USA 2017"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2017.03.29"] [Round "1"] [White "Onischuk, Al"] [Black "Naroditsky, D."] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E20"] [WhiteElo "2667"] [BlackElo "2646"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "1r3rk1/p3b1pp/bq2pp2/2pP4/4P3/2p1N1P1/P3QPBP/2RR2K1 w - - 0 22"] [PlyCount "25"] [EventDate "2017.03.29"] 22. Qg4 {White's position looks promising, but Dan is not fazed.} f5 $1 23. exf5 exf5 24. Nxf5 Bf6 25. d6 Kh8 26. Ne7 $6 {Thematic, but it also allows Black a thematic counterplay against f2.} ({Instead, the crafty exchange sac} 26. Be4 Bb7 27. Rb1 c2 $1 28. Bxc2 Qc6 29. Rxb7 Rxb7 30. Ne3 {would leave White with some chances to get more than a draw.}) 26... Bd4 27. Ng6+ {Nothing else left to do.} hxg6 28. Qh4+ Kg8 29. Bd5+ Rf7 30. Bxf7+ Kxf7 31. Qe7+ Kg8 32. Qe6+ Kh7 33. Qh3+ Kg8 34. Qe6+ 1/2-1/2

Varuzhan Akobian, one of the stars of the St. Louis Archbishops winning team in the inaugural online PRO League season is also not playing as much as he used to. As a result his game was plagued by time trouble. It nearly cost him today against Jeffery Xiong, as a quiet line of the Gruenfeld didn't work out as planned. First White's opening advantage fizzled out, then he was denied a bailout. Poor Varuzhan ended up struggling through two big time trouble sessions just trying to save his skin. He might have failed too, had Jeffery succeeded in finding the right way to pushing the white rook out of the a-file on move 56.

Jeffery Xiong had his chance in round one, but missed a key move to get his pawn forward

Yaro Zherebukh's US Championship debut drew the veteran Gata Kamsky, and they drew their game after an unorthodox opening had led them to a roughly balanced position.

Not to be forgotten is the Women's Championship, played alongside with the main event. The defending Champion Nazi Paikidze started off with a quiet draw with Black. The same went for Ms 7-time Champion Irina Krush, whose position at some moment of the game gave cause for alarm.

Worse was the fate of Irina's long-time competitor and teammate Anna Zatonskih, who tried very hard to win her game only to walk into a mating net in a drawn rook ending. For sure the jet lag didn't help, as Anna traveled from Germany where she lives with her husband GM Daniel Fridman and two kids.

Jennifer Yu vs Anna Zatonskih

 

In this position Anna played 57...Rd1+ and resigned immediately in view of 58. Kc2 Rxd6 59. Ra8+ Ra6 60. Rxa6 mate

A disastrous start for 4-time champion Anna Zatonskih

All this opened the door for another favorite, Tatev Abrahamyan, to take the lead.

Tatev Abrahamyan vs Apurva Virkud

[Event "ch-USA w 2017"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2017.03.29"] [Round "1"] [White "Abrahamyan, T."] [Black "Virkud, Apurva"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B90"] [WhiteElo "2364"] [BlackElo "2262"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "67"] [EventDate "2017.03.29"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. f3 {In Tatev's capable hands the English Attack is a deadly weapon. She scores exceptionally well in sharp Sicilians regardless of her opponent's preparation.} e6 7. Be3 b5 8. Qd2 Nbd7 9. g4 Nb6 10. a4 Nc4 11. Bxc4 bxc4 12. a5 Bb7 13. Na4 Qc7 {Leaving theory already?} ({I'm no expert on this line, but isn't Black supposed to play} 13... d5 {right away?} 14. e5 Nd7 15. f4 Qh4+ 16. Bf2 Qxg4 17. Rg1 Qh5 {Gelfand had a game like this, and as a rule whatever Boris Gelfand plays on the black side of the Najdorf is writ large.}) 14. Nb6 Rb8 15. Ra4 d5 {Now it is forced.} 16. g5 Nd7 ({More active seems} 16... Nh5 {There's a nice tactical point to it in} 17. exd5 Bxd5 18. Ne2 Rd8 19. Nxd5 Qc6 $1) 17. exd5 Nxb6 $2 (17... Bxd5 18. Nxd5 exd5 19. O-O Rxb2 20. Re1 {looks dangerous for Black, but perhaps she can survive thanks to the misplaced Ra4.}) 18. axb6 Qd7 19. Rxc4 Qxd5 {It's possible the young Ms. Virkud counted on winning back the b6-pawn and just missed the following tactic. Maybe so, but I bet Black was in a tailspin right out of the opening and had no control over events whatsoever.} 20. Rc7 Bd6 $2 21. c4 Qe5 22. Rxb7 $1 Rxb7 23. Nc6 {Just like that it's game over.} Qf5 24. Qxd6 f6 25. O-O Rf8 26. Nd4 Qd3 27. Qxe6+ Re7 28. Qc6+ Kf7 29. Qd5+ Kg6 30. Bf4 Rff7 31. gxf6 gxf6 32. Nc6 Rd7 33. Qxd3+ Rxd3 34. Na5 1-0

Well, Tatev has long been chasing her first National Title. She almost got it last year, only to yield to Nazi Paikidze at the finish line. Perhaps, this year?

GM Alejandro Ramirez commenting live

US Championship pairings/results

Round 1 on 2017/03/29 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 1 2666 GM Shankland Samuel L ½ - ½ GM Caruana Fabiano 2817 12
2 2 2822 GM So Wesley 1 - 0 GM Shabalov Alexander 2556 11
3 3 2667 GM Onischuk Alexander ½ - ½ GM Naroditsky Daniel 2646 10
4 4 2605 GM Zherebukh Yaroslav ½ - ½ GM Kamsky Gata 2659 9
5 5 2645 GM Akobian Varuzhan ½ - ½ GM Xiong Jeffery 2674 8
6 6 2668 GM Robson Ray 0 - 1 GM Nakamura Hikaru 2793 7
Round 2 on 2017/03/30 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 12 2817 GM Caruana Fabiano   GM Nakamura Hikaru 2793 7
2 8 2674 GM Xiong Jeffery   GM Robson Ray 2668 6
3 9 2659 GM Kamsky Gata   GM Akobian Varuzhan 2645 5
4 10 2646 GM Naroditsky Daniel   GM Zherebukh Yaroslav 2605 4
5 11 2556 GM Shabalov Alexander   GM Onischuk Alexander 2667 3
6 1 2666 GM Shankland Samuel L   GM So Wesley 2822 2
Round 3 on 2017/03/31 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 2 2822 GM So Wesley   GM Caruana Fabiano 2817 12
2 3 2667 GM Onischuk Alexander   GM Shankland Samuel L 2666 1
3 4 2605 GM Zherebukh Yaroslav   GM Shabalov Alexander 2556 11
4 5 2645 GM Akobian Varuzhan   GM Naroditsky Daniel 2646 10
5 6 2668 GM Robson Ray   GM Kamsky Gata 2659 9
6 7 2793 GM Nakamura Hikaru   GM Xiong Jeffery 2674 8
Round 4 on 2017/04/01 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 12 2817 GM Caruana Fabiano   GM Xiong Jeffery 2674 8
2 9 2659 GM Kamsky Gata   GM Nakamura Hikaru 2793 7
3 10 2646 GM Naroditsky Daniel   GM Robson Ray 2668 6
4 11 2556 GM Shabalov Alexander   GM Akobian Varuzhan 2645 5
5 1 2666 GM Shankland Samuel L   GM Zherebukh Yaroslav 2605 4
6 2 2822 GM So Wesley   GM Onischuk Alexander 2667 3
Round 5 on 2017/04/02 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 3 2667 GM Onischuk Alexander   GM Caruana Fabiano 2817 12
2 4 2605 GM Zherebukh Yaroslav   GM So Wesley 2822 2
3 5 2645 GM Akobian Varuzhan   GM Shankland Samuel L 2666 1
4 6 2668 GM Robson Ray   GM Shabalov Alexander 2556 11
5 7 2793 GM Nakamura Hikaru   GM Naroditsky Daniel 2646 10
6 8 2674 GM Xiong Jeffery   GM Kamsky Gata 2659 9
Round 6 on 2017/04/04 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 12 2817 GM Caruana Fabiano   GM Kamsky Gata 2659 9
2 10 2646 GM Naroditsky Daniel   GM Xiong Jeffery 2674 8
3 11 2556 GM Shabalov Alexander   GM Nakamura Hikaru 2793 7
4 1 2666 GM Shankland Samuel L   GM Robson Ray 2668 6
5 2 2822 GM So Wesley   GM Akobian Varuzhan 2645 5
6 3 2667 GM Onischuk Alexander   GM Zherebukh Yaroslav 2605 4
Round 7 on 2017/04/05 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 4 2605 GM Zherebukh Yaroslav   GM Caruana Fabiano 2817 12
2 5 2645 GM Akobian Varuzhan   GM Onischuk Alexander 2667 3
3 6 2668 GM Robson Ray   GM So Wesley 2822 2
4 7 2793 GM Nakamura Hikaru   GM Shankland Samuel L 2666 1
5 8 2674 GM Xiong Jeffery   GM Shabalov Alexander 2556 11
6 9 2659 GM Kamsky Gata   GM Naroditsky Daniel 2646 10
Round 8 on 2017/04/06 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 12 2817 GM Caruana Fabiano   GM Naroditsky Daniel 2646 10
2 11 2556 GM Shabalov Alexander   GM Kamsky Gata 2659 9
3 1 2666 GM Shankland Samuel L   GM Xiong Jeffery 2674 8
4 2 2822 GM So Wesley   GM Nakamura Hikaru 2793 7
5 3 2667 GM Onischuk Alexander   GM Robson Ray 2668 6
6 4 2605 GM Zherebukh Yaroslav   GM Akobian Varuzhan 2645 5
Round 9 on 2017/04/07 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 5 2645 GM Akobian Varuzhan   GM Caruana Fabiano 2817 12
2 6 2668 GM Robson Ray   GM Zherebukh Yaroslav 2605 4
3 7 2793 GM Nakamura Hikaru   GM Onischuk Alexander 2667 3
4 8 2674 GM Xiong Jeffery   GM So Wesley 2822 2
5 9 2659 GM Kamsky Gata   GM Shankland Samuel L 2666 1
6 10 2646 GM Naroditsky Daniel   GM Shabalov Alexander 2556 11
Round 10 on 2017/04/08 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 12 2817 GM Caruana Fabiano   GM Shabalov Alexander 2556 11
2 1 2666 GM Shankland Samuel L   GM Naroditsky Daniel 2646 10
3 2 2822 GM So Wesley   GM Kamsky Gata 2659 9
4 3 2667 GM Onischuk Alexander   GM Xiong Jeffery 2674 8
5 4 2605 GM Zherebukh Yaroslav   GM Nakamura Hikaru 2793 7
6 5 2645 GM Akobian Varuzhan   GM Robson Ray 2668 6
Round 11 on 2017/04/09 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 6 2668 GM Robson Ray   GM Caruana Fabiano 2817 12
2 7 2793 GM Nakamura Hikaru   GM Akobian Varuzhan 2645 5
3 8 2674 GM Xiong Jeffery   GM Zherebukh Yaroslav 2605 4
4 9 2659 GM Kamsky Gata   GM Onischuk Alexander 2667 3
5 10 2646 GM Naroditsky Daniel   GM So Wesley 2822 2
6 11 2556 GM Shabalov Alexander   GM Shankland Samuel L 2666 1

US Women's Championship pairings/results

Round 1 on 2017/03/29 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 1 2257 WGM Sharevich Anna ½ - ½ WGM Nemcova Katerina 2359 12
2 2 2162 WCM Feng Maggie ½ - ½ GM Krush Irina 2444 11
3 3 2272 WGM Foisor Sabina-Francesca 1 - 0 WFM Yip Carissa 2234 10
4 4 2364 WGM Abrahamyan Tatev 1 - 0 WFM Virkud Apurva 2262 9
5 5 2196 WIM Yu Jennifer R 1 - 0 IM Zatonskih Anna 2451 8
6 6 2173 WIM Nguyen Emily ½ - ½ IM Paikidze Nazi 2369 7
Round 2 on 2017/03/30 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 12 2359 WGM Nemcova Katerina   IM Paikidze Nazi 2369 7
2 8 2451 IM Zatonskih Anna   WIM Nguyen Emily 2173 6
3 9 2262 WFM Virkud Apurva   WIM Yu Jennifer R 2196 5
4 10 2234 WFM Yip Carissa   WGM Abrahamyan Tatev 2364 4
5 11 2444 GM Krush Irina   WGM Foisor Sabina-Francesca 2272 3
6 1 2257 WGM Sharevich Anna   WCM Feng Maggie 2162 2
Round 3 on 2017/03/31 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 2 2162 WCM Feng Maggie   WGM Nemcova Katerina 2359 12
2 3 2272 WGM Foisor Sabina-Francesca   WGM Sharevich Anna 2257 1
3 4 2364 WGM Abrahamyan Tatev   GM Krush Irina 2444 11
4 5 2196 WIM Yu Jennifer R   WFM Yip Carissa 2234 10
5 6 2173 WIM Nguyen Emily   WFM Virkud Apurva 2262 9
6 7 2369 IM Paikidze Nazi   IM Zatonskih Anna 2451 8
Round 4 on 2017/04/01 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 12 2359 WGM Nemcova Katerina   IM Zatonskih Anna 2451 8
2 9 2262 WFM Virkud Apurva   IM Paikidze Nazi 2369 7
3 10 2234 WFM Yip Carissa   WIM Nguyen Emily 2173 6
4 11 2444 GM Krush Irina   WIM Yu Jennifer R 2196 5
5 1 2257 WGM Sharevich Anna   WGM Abrahamyan Tatev 2364 4
6 2 2162 WCM Feng Maggie   WGM Foisor Sabina-Francesca 2272 3
Round 5 on 2017/04/02 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 3 2272 WGM Foisor Sabina-Francesca   WGM Nemcova Katerina 2359 12
2 4 2364 WGM Abrahamyan Tatev   WCM Feng Maggie 2162 2
3 5 2196 WIM Yu Jennifer R   WGM Sharevich Anna 2257 1
4 6 2173 WIM Nguyen Emily   GM Krush Irina 2444 11
5 7 2369 IM Paikidze Nazi   WFM Yip Carissa 2234 10
6 8 2451 IM Zatonskih Anna   WFM Virkud Apurva 2262 9
Round 6 on 2017/04/04 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 12 2359 WGM Nemcova Katerina   WFM Virkud Apurva 2262 9
2 10 2234 WFM Yip Carissa   IM Zatonskih Anna 2451 8
3 11 2444 GM Krush Irina   IM Paikidze Nazi 2369 7
4 1 2257 WGM Sharevich Anna   WIM Nguyen Emily 2173 6
5 2 2162 WCM Feng Maggie   WIM Yu Jennifer R 2196 5
6 3 2272 WGM Foisor Sabina-Francesca   WGM Abrahamyan Tatev 2364 4
Round 7 on 2017/04/05 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 4 2364 WGM Abrahamyan Tatev   WGM Nemcova Katerina 2359 12
2 5 2196 WIM Yu Jennifer R   WGM Foisor Sabina-Francesca 2272 3
3 6 2173 WIM Nguyen Emily   WCM Feng Maggie 2162 2
4 7 2369 IM Paikidze Nazi   WGM Sharevich Anna 2257 1
5 8 2451 IM Zatonskih Anna   GM Krush Irina 2444 11
6 9 2262 WFM Virkud Apurva   WFM Yip Carissa 2234 10
Round 8 on 2017/04/06 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 12 2359 WGM Nemcova Katerina   WFM Yip Carissa 2234 10
2 11 2444 GM Krush Irina   WFM Virkud Apurva 2262 9
3 1 2257 WGM Sharevich Anna   IM Zatonskih Anna 2451 8
4 2 2162 WCM Feng Maggie   IM Paikidze Nazi 2369 7
5 3 2272 WGM Foisor Sabina-Francesca   WIM Nguyen Emily 2173 6
6 4 2364 WGM Abrahamyan Tatev   WIM Yu Jennifer R 2196 5
Round 9 on 2017/04/07 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 5 2196 WIM Yu Jennifer R   WGM Nemcova Katerina 2359 12
2 6 2173 WIM Nguyen Emily   WGM Abrahamyan Tatev 2364 4
3 7 2369 IM Paikidze Nazi   WGM Foisor Sabina-Francesca 2272 3
4 8 2451 IM Zatonskih Anna   WCM Feng Maggie 2162 2
5 9 2262 WFM Virkud Apurva   WGM Sharevich Anna 2257 1
6 10 2234 WFM Yip Carissa   GM Krush Irina 2444 11
Round 10 on 2017/04/08 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 12 2359 WGM Nemcova Katerina   GM Krush Irina 2444 11
2 1 2257 WGM Sharevich Anna   WFM Yip Carissa 2234 10
3 2 2162 WCM Feng Maggie   WFM Virkud Apurva 2262 9
4 3 2272 WGM Foisor Sabina-Francesca   IM Zatonskih Anna 2451 8
5 4 2364 WGM Abrahamyan Tatev   IM Paikidze Nazi 2369 7
6 5 2196 WIM Yu Jennifer R   WIM Nguyen Emily 2173 6
Round 11 on 2017/04/09 at 2 PM (EST)
Bo. No. Rtg   Name Result   Name Rtg No.
1 6 2173 WIM Nguyen Emily   WGM Nemcova Katerina 2359 12
2 7 2369 IM Paikidze Nazi   WIM Yu Jennifer R 2196 5
3 8 2451 IM Zatonskih Anna   WGM Abrahamyan Tatev 2364 4
4 9 2262 WFM Virkud Apurva   WGM Foisor Sabina-Francesca 2272 3
5 10 2234 WFM Yip Carissa   WCM Feng Maggie 2162 2
6 11 2444 GM Krush Irina   WGM Sharevich Anna 2257 1

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Nite Moves Nite Moves 4/1/2017 03:45
Who is the co-host with GM Alejandro Ramirez??
Raymond Labelle Raymond Labelle 3/30/2017 08:46
"Of all the participants in both sections of this championship, how many were born in the U.S. and had the US as their primary residence their whole life?"

My part of the research, only for US Championship (did not do the work for the female section).

With US as primary residence since birth.

- Jeffrey Xiong
- Ray Robson
- Sam Shankland
- Daniel Naroditsky

Primary residence in US since age two (2):

- Hikaru Nakamura

Born and raised in the US - left for Europe at 12 for chess training purposes:

- Fabiano Caruana.

Moved to US at 15 years old:

- Gata Kamsky

Moved to US at 18 and 19 years old:

- Wesley So
- Varuzhan Akobian
- Yaroslav Zherebuk

Moved to US at 25 years old (now 41):

- Alexander Onischuk.

I do not know when Alexander Shabalov (now 49) moved to US, but I know he became the US chess champion for the first time in 1993 at the age of 20 or 21 years old.

Legitimate Americans, by birth and/or by choice:

- All of the above.
Daniel Miller Daniel Miller 3/30/2017 06:11
Of all the participants in both sections of this championship, how many were born in the U.S. and had the US as their primary residence their whole life?
Denix Denix 3/30/2017 05:46
How to find Wesley's 17. Be2 only to reposition it 10 moves later with 27. Bf3. Was this the idea behind 7. g4
Steven E DuCharm Steven E DuCharm 3/30/2017 01:12
Go Winners!
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