Unive Crown Group Hoogeveen: Nakamura beats Giri in round one

10/21/2012 – The 16th Univé Chess Festival is taking place from the 19th to 27th of October 2012, in Hoogeveen, Holland. The main event is a four-player Crown Group double round robin with Hikaru Nakamura, USA, Anish Giri and Sergey Tiviakov, Holland, and women's world champion Hou Yifan, China. The average rating is 2695, making this a category 18 tournament. Report with GM commentary.

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The 16th Univé Chess Festival is taking place from the 19th to 27th of October 2012, in Hoogeveen, Holland. The main event is a four-player Crown Group double round robin with Hikaru Nakamura, USA, rated 2786, Anish Giri, NL, 2730, Sergey Tiviakov, NL, 2659, and women's world champion Hou Yifan, China, 2605. The average rating is 2695, making this a category 18 tournament.

The Unive Open has 78 players and is a nine round event that started on October 19. The prize fund is € 7,500, with a first prize of € 3,000. Top seed is Erwin L'Ami, who leads after thre rounds with a 100% score. There are also two nine-round amateur tournaments with a maximum of 84 players each. The first prize for both groups is every € 250. The sponsor of the Univé Chess Festival is Univé.


Guests at the opening ceremony


Commentator IM Hans Böhm introduces US GM Hikaru Nakamura...


... second seed GM Anish Giri from Holland


... Dutch GM Sergey Tiviakov


... and reigning women's world champion Hou Yifan

Festival Schedule

Date Crown Group Univé Open Amateur
19 October      1st round 1st round
20 October   2nd round 2nd round
21 October 1st round 3rd round 3rd round
22 October 2nd round 4th round 4th round
23 October 3rd round 5th round 5th round
24 October rest day 6th round 6th round
25 October 4th round 7th round 7th round
26 October 5th round 8th round 8th round
27 October 6th round 9th round 9th round

First round Crown Group report

Round 1 – Sunday, October 21, 2012, 14:00h
Hou Yifan
½-½
Sergey Tiviakov
Nakamura, Hikaru
1-0
Giri, Anish

Commentary by GM Eltaj Safarli

[Event "Hoogeveen 2012"] [Site "?"] [Date "2012.10.21"] [Round "1"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C67"] [WhiteElo "2775"] [BlackElo "2693"] [Annotator "Eltaj Safarli"] [PlyCount "127"] [EventDate "2012.10.21"] [SourceDate "2012.10.21"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. Re1 Nd6 6. Nxe5 Be7 7. Bf1 Nxe5 8. Rxe5 O-O 9. d4 Bf6 10. Re1 Re8 11. c3 {White chooses a solid continuation. Recently 11.Bf4 became extremely popular} (11. Bf4 $5 Rxe1 12. Qxe1 Ne8 13. Nc3 Bxd4 14. Nd5 c6 $5 15. Ne7+ Kf8 16. Nxc8 Qf6 17. Qb4+ c5 18. Qd2 Rxc8 19. c3 Be5 20. Bxe5 Qxe5 21. Qxd7 Qc7 22. Rd1 Qxd7 23. Rxd7 Rc7 24. Rxc7 Nxc7 25. Bd3 h6 26. f4 Ne8 27. Kf2 Nd6 28. Ke3 Ke7 29. g3 b6 30. Be2 Ke6 31. Bg4+ Ke7 32. Be2 Ke6 33. Bg4+ Ke7 34. Be2 {1/2-1/2 Kasimdzhanov,R (2684)-Leko,P (2737) London ENG 2012}) 11... Rxe1 12. Qxe1 Nf5 (12... Qe8 13. Qxe8+ Nxe8 14. Bf4 { is just very slightly better for White.}) 13. Bf4 c6 ({Of course not} 13... d5 $4 {and White wins.}) 14. a4 $5 {Is interesting. White wants to gain more space on the queenside.} (14. Nd2 d5 15. Bd3) 14... a5 {Black is weakening his pawn structure. It looks a bit dubious to me because a4-a5 was not dangerous for Black. I like 14...d5. For example :} (14... d5 15. a5 (15. Nd2 Nh4) 15... Nh4 16. Nd2 Bf5 17. Nb3 h6 18. Nc5 b6 19. axb6 axb6 20. Nb7 Qf8) 15. Bc7 $5 Qf8 16. Bd3 (16. Nd2 d5 17. Nb3 Bd8 $1 $11) 16... d5 17. Bb6 (17. Nd2 {was probably better. White's idea is just to bring his rook into the game after Qe2, Re1 and probably Nf3 or Nb3 with a normal position where White stands slightly better.} Nh4 ({Black doesn't have} 17... Nd6 $4 {17...Nd6 as in the game because of} 18. Bxd6 Qxd6 19. Qe8+ Qf8 20. Bxh7+ $1 $18) (17... Bd7 18. Nb3 Bd8 19. Bxd8 Qxd8 20. Nc5 b6 21. Nxd7 Qxd7 22. Qb1 $5) 18. Qe2 Bf5 19. Bxf5 Nxf5 20. Re1 $14) 17... Nd6 18. Nd2 Be6 ({After} 18... Bf5 {White has some initiative:} 19. Bxf5 Nxf5 20. Nb3 Bd8 21. Bc5 Be7 22. Qe5 $5) 19. Qb1 $5 {An interesting try} (19. Nb3 Bd8 20. Bxd8 Qxd8 21. Nc5 Bc8 {followed by b6 with an equal position}) 19... g6 20. b4 axb4 21. Qxb4 Bf5 22. Bc5 {At first glance I thought White can use Black's weaknesses, but now it looks like Black can hold the position.} (22. Bxf5 Nxf5 23. Bc5 Qc8 24. Rb1 Kg7 $11) 22... Bxd3 23. Bxd6 Qe8 $5 (23... Qc8 24. Nb3 (24. Re1 Qd7 25. Nf3 Ba6 {followed by Re8 with an equality}) 24... Qd7 25. Nc5 Qxd6 26. Qxb7 Rb8 27. Qd7 Qf4 28. Nxd3 Qd2 29. Qd6 Rb3 30. Qxf6 Qxd3 $11) 24. Nf3 ({Now} 24. Nb3 $6 {is not so good because of } b6 $1 $15 25. h3 (25. Qxb6 Rxa4 $1)) (24. Qxb7 Rxa4 25. Qb2 Rxa1+ 26. Qxa1 Bb5 $15 {/=}) 24... Ba6 25. Be5 Be7 {It seems soon the game will end in a draw by repetition} (25... Bd8 $5 26. Re1 Qd7 27. Bf4 (27. Bd6 Bf6 28. Be7 Bg7 29. Ne5 Qf5) 27... Bf6 28. Qb1 Re8 29. Ne5 $11) 26. Bd6 Bf6 27. Re1 {Nakamura thought for a while and played Re1. He actually thinks that he can play on. Well, the position was balanced, so now let's just see what happens next} Qd7 28. Be7 Bg7 29. Ne5 Qf5 $6 ({I think that after} 29... Qe6 $1 {Black wouldn't face any problems. It looks very strong - the black queen controls the d6 square and will be playing Re8 next} 30. Nf3 (30. Nd3 Qf5 (30... Qd7 $6 31. Nc5 $1) 31. Nc5 Re8 32. g3 (32. Nxa6 bxa6) 32... Bf6 33. Nxa6 bxa6 34. Re3 $11) 30... Qd7 31. Ne5 Qe6 $11) 30. Qd6 $1 {Now White has a small initiative.} (30. h3 f6 31. Ng4 (31. g4 Qc8 32. Nf3 Qd7 33. Qd6 Rd8 34. Qxd7 Rxd7) 31... h5 32. Ne3 Qd7) 30... Re8 (30... h6 31. h3 (31. Bd8 $5)) (30... f6 $4 31. g4) (30... Qe6 31. Qxe6 fxe6 32. Nd7) 31. h3 Qe6 {Blacks choose a passive defence in the endgame. It's probably a reasonable decision, since he stands slightly weaker. However, the position is still quite defensible.} 32. Qxe6 fxe6 $14 33. Bc5 ( 33. Bb4 {was better}) 33... g5 $6 {I don't like this move. It creates new weaknesses and also in the future White may play g4, Kg2, Kg3, h4 or f4.} ({ Probably it was better to take on e5:} 33... Bxe5 {But anyway, playing a position like this with Black is quite tough} 34. Rxe5 Kf7 35. f3 Bc4 36. a5 $14) 34. Bb4 $5 (34. g4) 34... h6 35. Nd7 $1 Kf7 36. Re3 $1 Kg6 37. Bd6 $1 $16 h5 38. Nc5 Bf6 39. g4 ({It was possible just to take the pawn, but White chose to play 39.g4 and slowly strenghten the position after Kg2-Kg3 etc.} 39. Nxe6 h4 $5) 39... hxg4 40. hxg4 Kf7 41. Kg2 Ra8 42. a5 Re8 {This move doesn't miss the the advantage, but I think just 43.Kg3 would be better. Black can't take the a5 pawn, for example :} 43. Re1 $6 (43. Kg3 Bd8 44. Rf3+ Kg7 (44... Kg8 45. Nxe6 $1) 45. Nd7 $1 Be2 (45... Bxa5 46. Be5+ Kh6 47. Rf6+ Kh7 48. Nf8+ Kg8 49. Nxe6) 46. Be5+ Kg8 47. Re3 Bb5 48. Nf6+ Bxf6 49. Bxf6 Ra8 50. Bxg5 $18) (43. Bc7 $5 $16) 43... Bd8 $1 44. Ra1 (44. Rb1 Bxa5 45. Nxb7 Bxc3) 44... Rh8 45. Be5 Rh7 46. Bd6 Rh8 47. f3 Rh6 48. Be5 $6 (48. Rb1 Bxa5 49. Rb3 $1 $16) 48... Rh7 49. Kg3 Rh6 $2 ({Anish didn't use his last chance. Most probably after} 49... Be7 $1 {it was a draw.} 50. Nxb7 (50. Nxa6 bxa6 51. c4 (51. Rb1 Bd8 $1 52. Rb7+ Kg6) 51... dxc4 52. Rc1 Bd8 53. Rxc4 Bxa5 54. Rxc6 Be1+ $1 55. Kg2 a5) 50... Bxb7 51. a6 Bxa6 52. Rxa6 c5 53. Ra7 Kg6) 50. Rb1 Bxa5 51. Nxb7 Bxb7 (51... Bxc3 52. Nd6+ Ke7 53. Rb6 $1) 52. Rxb7+ Ke8 53. Rg7 $1 Bd8 (53... Bxc3 54. Rxg5 Rh1 55. Rg6 Kf7 56. Rg7+ Ke8 57. Rc7 $18) 54. Kg2 $6 {It's just a waste of time. After 54.Rg8 white could easily win} (54. Rg8+ $1 Kd7 55. f4 gxf4+ 56. Bxf4 Rh1 57. Kg2 Rb1 58. g5 $18) 54... Be7 55. Rg8+ Kd7 56. Ra8 {After White's inaccuracy on the 54th move, Black has chances to survive again.} c5 {After White's inaccuracy on the 54th move, Black has chances to survive again.} 57. Rg8 cxd4 58. cxd4 Rh7 59. f4 gxf4 $2 {In time trouble both players took turns making mistakes.} (59... Rh4 $1 60. Kg3 (60. Kf3 Rh3+ $1 61. Kf2 gxf4 62. g5 Bd6 63. Bf6 Rg3 64. g6 e5 $1) 60... gxf4+ 61. Kxf4 Rh1 62. g5 Bd6 63. Rg7+ Kc6 64. g6 Rg1 65. Rg8 Kd7 {with a draw}) 60. g5 Bd6 (60... f3+ 61. Kxf3 Rh3+ 62. Kf4 Bd6 63. Rg7+ Kc6 64. g6 $18) 61. Bf6 (61. g6 Rh6 62. Rg7+ Kc6 63. Kf3 Rh1 64. Rg8 Bxe5 65. dxe5 Rg1 66. g7 (66. Kxf4 Kc5) 66... Kb7 67. Kxf4 d4 68. Ke4 Rg4+ 69. Kd3 Ka7 $11) 61... Be7 (61... Rf7 62. Kf3) ({Black had good chances to save the game after} 61... f3+ $1 62. Kxf3 Rh4 $1 63. Ra8 Rf4+ 64. Kg2 Rh4 ( 64... Rf5 65. Ra7+ Ke8 66. Kh3) 65. Rd8+ Kc7 66. Rg8 Rf4 67. Bh8 $5 {However, am not sure if it's a draw} Rg4+ 68. Kh3 Rg3+ 69. Kh4) 62. g6 f3+ 63. Kxf3 Rh5 (63... Rh3+ 64. Kg4 Bxf6 65. Kxh3 Ke7 66. Kg4 $1 Bxd4 67. Kh5 $18) 64. Be5 1-0

Video commentary of Hikaru Nakamura vs Anish Giri by Chess World.net

The author of the above video, Tryfon Gavriel, is also known as "Kingscrusher" on the Internet. He is a FIDE Candidate Master (CM), British Regional Chess Master, and has run a popular Youtube channel for many years. He also does the weekly "Kingscrusher Radio show" on Playchess.com on Tuesday evenings at 21:00 GMT. Kingscrusher is also the Webmaster of the correspondence style chess server Chessworld.net.


[Event "Hoogeveen 2012"] [Site "?"] [Date "2012.10.21"] [Round "1"] [White "Hou, Yifan"] [Black "Tiviakov, Sergei"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A00"] [WhiteElo "2623"] [BlackElo "2656"] [Annotator "Eltaj Safarli"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2012.10.21"] [SourceDate "2012.10.21"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7 5. Nf3 Ngf6 6. Nxf6+ Nxf6 7. Be3 Bd6 8. Bd3 b6 9. Ne5 O-O 10. Qf3 Nd5 11. Bd2 Bb7 12. c4 Bxe5 13. dxe5 Ne7 (13... Nf4 14. Bxh7+ Kxh7 15. Qxf4 Qd3 16. f3 Rfd8 17. Be3 {followed by Rc1, Kf2} Qc2 18. O-O) (13... Nb4 $5 14. Bxh7+ Kxh7 15. Qh3+ Kg8 16. Bxb4 c5 17. Bc3 Qg5 18. O-O Rfd8 19. Qg3 (19. Rfd1 Rxd1+ 20. Rxd1 Rd8) 19... Qf5 20. f3 Rd3 {with good compensation. I think White stands slightly better, but overall, the position is close to equal.}) 14. Qg3 Ng6 15. O-O-O Qd4 16. Rhe1 Qh4 17. f3 Qxg3 18. hxg3 Rfd8 19. Bg5 Re8 20. Bxg6 fxg6 21. Rd7 Rac8 22. Red1 Bc6 23. Rd8 b5 24. Rxc8 Rxc8 25. Rd8+ Rxd8 26. Bxd8 bxc4 27. Kd2 Kf7 28. Bxc7 g5 29. Kc3 g4 30. fxg4 Bd5 31. a3 Ke8 32. Kb4 Kd7 33. Bb8 a6 34. Kc5 c3 35. bxc3 Bxg2 36. Bd6 Bf3 37. g5 g6 38. c4 Be2 39. a4 Bf1 40. a5 Be2 41. Kd4 1/2-1/2

GM Eltaj Safarli

Born on May 18, 1992 in Baku, Azerbaijan, Eltaj Safarli has a current FIDE rating of 2616. Eltaj was European Youth Champion U10 in 2002, U12 in 2003, and World Youth Champion U10 in 2002. He won the Essent Open in Hoogeveen in 2007, shared 1-2 places in Benasque 2010, won the bronze medal in the World Junior U20 in 2008. He also won the Chigorin Memorial in St.Petersburg in 2010, and was Azerbaijan Champion in 2010. There followed a silver medal in the European Team Championship in Porto Carras 2011, a gold medal in the European Club Cup 2012 with his team SOCAR Azerbaijan. Safarli is a member of the Azerbaijan National team.

Schedule and results

Round 1 – Sunday, October 21, 2012, 14:00h
Hou Yifan
½-½
Sergey Tiviakov
Nakamura, Hikaru
1-0
Giri, Anish
Round 2 – Monday, October 22, 2012, 14:00h
Giri, Anish
  Hou Yifan
Nakamura, Hikaru
  Sergey Tiviakov
Round 3 – Tuesday, October 23, 2012, 14:00h
Sergey Tiviakov
  Giri, Anish
Hou Yifan
  Nakamura, Hikaru
Round 4 – Thursday, October 25, 2012, 14:00h
Sergey Tiviakov
  Hou Yifan
Giri, Anish
  Nakamura, Hikaru
Round 5 – Friday, October 26, 2012, 14:00h
Nakamura, Hikaru
  Hou Yifan
Giri, Anish
  Sergey Tiviakov
Round 6 – Saturday, October 27, 2012, 14:00h
Hou Yifan
  Giri, Anish
Sergey Tiviakov
  Nakamura, Hikaru

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 11 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.

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