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The Dutch Stonewall by Leonid Kritz

by Albert Silver
7/25/2013 – Often adding a new opening to one’s repertoire can be an intimidating task, not to mention onerous, which can require massive study. In Leonid Kritz’s 60-minute presentation of the Dutch Stonewall, it can be said that everything you need to play it has been covered, and he made sure you are ready for anything. A review by Albert Silver
 

Safe and active with the Dutch Stonewall

Review by Albert Silver

Often adding a new opening to one’s repertoire can be an intimidating task, not to mention onerous, which can involve books and books (or DVDs and DVDs) of study. In Leonid Kritz’s 60-minute presentation of the Dutch Stonewall, it can be said that everything you need to play it has been covered.

The contents

01: Introduction

Safe and active with the Dutch Stonewall: 1.d4 f5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 e6 4.c4 d5 / 1.d4 f5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nf3 d5

02: 5.Nh3
03: 5.Nf3 and later b3
04: 5.Nf3 and later Nc3
05: Stonewall without g3
06: Staunton Gambit: 1.d4 f5 2.e4 fxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6

The German GM does a very creditable job of presenting the main theory, while explaining the ideas and pitfalls of various replies, and covering the main ideas. He starts by presenting White’s main lines against it with g3 followed by Nh3, and while he covers the opening’s primary development, he is careful to highlight the guiding principles in the opening and middlegame struggle.

A view of the table of contents

Kritz strikes a very good balance between theory and positional ideas so that the viewer understands when and why White should plant a piece on a key square and when he should avoid it. Although the course is presented from Black’s perspective, it can not only be of use to Black players so they can feel confident exploiting some of the more obvious blunders in the opening phase, but also to White players seeking to prepare against it.

Leonid Kritz not only covers the theory and plans, but is sure to point out even
the most basic tactics

In the next part, the student is shown how to play against g3 and Nf3, and finally what to do if White chooses to forego g3 altogether. Often the opponent club players will be eager to ambush their opponent by playing a gambit to bring them into unknown territory as well as gain a psychological edge. In this case, the prime candidate is the Staunton Gambit, and though it has nothing to do with the Dutch Stonewall in itself, a detailed overview is provided to guarantee that he did not send out his student with a blindspot waiting to be exploited.

The grandmaster’s English is very clear, as ChessBase Magazine subscribers already know, and his expert course leaves one feeling ready to take the opening for a spin, without fear of getting lost at sea. I have no reservations in recommending it to anyone ready to try something a little different.

A look at the introduction

Safe and active with the Dutch Stonewall can be purchased at the ChessBase Shop

Editor and writer at ChessBase News. Lives in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
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