Tbilisi Rd3: Tomashevsky emerges leader

by Alejandro Ramirez
2/17/2015 – A nice round over all in Tbilisi, despite two games finishing in very dull draws. Tomashevsky was victorious against Grischuk after a series of minor mistakes from both sides in heavy time pressure. Mamedyarov scores his second win with black, putting him right behind Tomashevsky. Also with 2.0/3 are Giri and now Jakovenko, who received a nice gift from the eccentric Jobava.

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The third stage of the 2014-2015 FIDE Grand Prix is taking place in Tbilisi, Georgia. The tournament will run from February 14th to February 28, 2014. Some of the strongest players in the world will compete in a Round Robin event. The winner and runner-up of the Grand Prix series will earn their spot at the 2016 Candidate's Tournament.

Round Three

Round 03 –February 17, 2015 - 15:00
Svidler, Peter 2739
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
½-½
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
½-½
Giri, Anish 2797
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
0-1
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
1-0
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Jobava, Baadur 2696
0-1
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733

Commentators Tornike Sanikidze and Keti Tsatsalashvili

Svidler, Peter ½-½ Radjabov, Teimour
Lots of trades in a nearly equal variation of the Ragozin left nearly no winning chances for either side around move 20. The game finishes ten moves later with no significant change in the position.

Not too much happened in Svidler-Radjabov today

Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime ½-½ Dominguez, Leinier
An interesting game. The Breyer defense, despite being passive, continues to be a solid way for black to handle the Closed Spanish. A small tactical melee simplified into a position where White had a bit of pressure, but Black's pair of bishops and central majority proved menacing. MVL was able to win a pawn, but it was inconsequential; the material by this point had been reduced to nothing and the opposited colored bishops guaranteed a trivial draw.

An intense battle in a theoretically heavy Breyer

Kasimdzhanov, Rustam ½-½ Giri, Anish
Not a very exciting duel. Kasimdzhanov chose a relatively harmless variation against the Grunfeld. He won a pawn that he could not keep alive. A repetition that started on move 16 sealed the draw.

An easy draw with black, is not something a 2800 will shy away from

Andreikin, Dmitry 0-1 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar
And who said that all exchange Slavs finished in draws?

Three games, no draws! Not only tha, Mamedyarov has
won both of his blacks and lost his only white.

[Event "Tbilisi FIDE Grand Prix"] [Site "Tbilisi GEO"] [Date "2015.02.17"] [Round "3"] [White "Andreikin, D."] [Black "Mamedyarov, S."] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D13"] [WhiteElo "2737"] [BlackElo "2759"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "113"] [EventDate "2015.02.14"] 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. c4 c6 4. cxd5 cxd5 5. Nc3 Nc6 {This version of the Exchange Slav has never been deemed as dangerous; and for a good reason. The development of the knight to f3 doesn't allow White some options that he has when he first develops other pieces.} 6. Bf4 a6 7. Ne5 (7. e3 Bg4 $11) (7. Rc1 {is a little more tenatious, but here too Black has been doing just fine.}) 7... e6 (7... Bd7 {was Mamedyarov's choice twice against Morozevich in the Mindgames in China a couple of years ago - first in the rapid and then in the blitz, though the Azeri lost both games.}) 8. Nxc6 bxc6 9. e3 Bd6 10. Qd2 c5 11. dxc5 Bxc5 12. Rc1 O-O {since d5 cannot be taken it is quite obvious that Black has no problems from the opening. His development is nearly complete, his central control is good and his pieces will be active.} 13. Be2 (13. Nxd5 Ne4 $1 $19) 13... Bd7 14. O-O Qb6 15. Be5 Rfc8 16. Bxf6 $6 {The structural weakness that Black suffers is not worth as much as the pair of bishops. Mamedyarov stands with a slight advantage thanks to his superior activity.} gxf6 17. e4 d4 18. e5 {This was Andrekin's idea. Clever, but insufficient.} Be7 (18... fxe5 $2 19. Qg5+ $16) (18... dxc3 19. Rxc3 $1 Bc6 20. Rg3+ Kf8 21. exf6 {with a serious attack, though only deep analysis will reveal if it is enough for an advantage, there is no reason for Mamedyarov to go into this.}) 19. Bd3 f5 20. Ne2 (20. Ne4 $5 {This move was probably more in tune with continuing the attack, but it does seem that Black has a good way out of it:} fxe4 21. Bxe4 f5 22. exf6 Bxf6 23. Qh6 Bg7 24. Qxh7+ Kf8 {and since White has no space to rooklift his best would be to take on a8, leaving him with two rooks and two pawns for two bishops; a favorable material ratio for the two bishops in this position.}) 20... Kh8 21. Bc4 Bc6 22. Qxd4 Qb7 23. g3 Bg5 24. Nf4 Be4 25. Qe3 (25. Qd2 Rd8 26. Ng6+ hxg6 27. Qxg5 Bh1 28. f3 Bxf3 $15) 25... Qxb2 26. Ng6+ hxg6 27. Qxg5 Qxe5 28. Bxa6 Rxc1 29. Qh6+ Kg8 30. Rxc1 Bd5 {White is just worse. He has problems down the diagonal and his a-pawn is a weakness rather than a strength.} 31. Bc4 Bb7 32. Qe3 Qxe3 33. fxe3 Rc8 34. Rb1 Rxc4 35. Rxb7 Rc1+ 36. Kg2 Rc2+ 37. Kf3 Rxh2 {A nice transformation of advantages. The a-pawn is White's only chance to survive, but winning the h-pawn guarantees that the kingside pawn structure cannot be held together.} (37... Rxa2 38. h3 Kg7 {is not as clear.}) 38. a4 Ra2 39. Ra7 Ra3 40. a5 Kg7 41. a6 Kf6 42. Ke2 e5 (42... Kg5 $19) 43. Kd2 e4 44. Kc2 {Grandmasters are known to be as clever as possible. This doesn't work, but since passive defense clearly falls apart Andreikin tries to create some practical chances.} Rxe3 45. Kb2 Rd3 46. Rb7 Rd6 $1 (46... Rd8 47. a7 Ra8 48. Kc3 Kg5 49. Rxf7 Kg4 50. Kd2 {should also be winning, but it is more complicated.}) 47. a7 Ra6 48. Kc3 Kg5 49. Rxf7 Kg4 50. Rg7 Kf3 51. Rxg6 Rxa7 52. Rg5 Rf7 53. Kd2 Kf2 54. Rh5 e3+ 55. Kd3 e2 56. Rh2+ Kf3 57. Kd4 0-1

Tomashevsky, Evgeny 1-0 Grischuk, Alexander
A fierce battle in the King's Indian, full of sacrifices and mistakes!

Evgeny Tomashevsky is the leader after three rounds

[Event "Tbilisi FIDE Grand Prix"] [Site "Tbilisi GEO"] [Date "2015.02.17"] [Round "3"] [White "Tomashevsky, E."] [Black "Grischuk, A."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E90"] [WhiteElo "2716"] [BlackElo "2810"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2015.02.14"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. h3 e5 7. d5 a5 8. g4 Na6 9. Be3 Nd7 10. a3 c6 {When a 2800 player "blunders" a pawn on move 10, you know something is up.} 11. Rg1 {White ignores the break on the center and focuses on making f5 undesirable.} (11. dxc6 Ndc5 $1 {Seems to give Black plenty of compensation. If White takes on b7 the bishop will recapture and the pressure on e4 is annoying.} 12. b4 Ne6 13. c5 $5 bxc6 $1 14. cxd6 axb4 15. axb4 Nd4 $1 $13) 11... Rb8 12. Nd2 Ndc5 13. Rb1 Nd7 {Not a maneuver that inspires a lot of confidence in Black's position.} 14. Qf3 Ndc5 15. Qd1 Ra8 16. Rg3 Kh8 (16... Qb6 {looks awkward but perhaps preventing b4 was an important priority.}) 17. b4 axb4 18. axb4 Nd7 19. Ra1 Rb8 20. Rxa6 $1 {A powerful exchange sacrifice!} bxa6 (20... cxd5 21. Rxd6 d4 22. c5 dxc3 23. Nb1 $18) 21. dxc6 Nb6 22. Qa1 (22. b5 {was a bit more natural, simply to secure c6 as soon as possible.}) 22... Qc7 23. c5 $5 (23. b5 axb5 24. cxb5 Ra8 {makes Qa1 kind of senseless.}) 23... dxc5 24. bxc5 Na8 25. Qa4 {White has great chances at keeping the bind with his c-pawn. He plans to transfer his bishop from f1 to c6 to secure his c6 pawn, after which Black will have no moves.} Qa7 26. Nc4 $2 (26. Nd5 $1 {The players must have not noticed that there is a strong threat of c7 with this move.} Be6 27. c7 $1 Nxc7 28. c6 $18) 26... Be6 27. Bd3 $6 Rfd8 28. Ke2 Nc7 (28... Rd4 $5 $15 {It was the perfect time to counter sacrifice the exchange. Black might even be better once the bishop trades on d4 since the queen will take on c5 promptly.}) 29. Nb6 Bf6 30. Bc4 Bxc4+ 31. Qxc4 Ne6 32. Ncd5 {Now it is clear that things went wrong for Black. He is completely tied down.} Bg7 33. Rf3 Re8 34. c7 Rb7 35. c8=Q Rxc8 36. Nxc8 Rb2+ 37. Kf1 1-0

Jobava, Baadur 0-1 Jakovenko, Dmitry
A rather strange game to explain. In short, Jobava's attack on the kingside was suspicious at best, allowing Black to set-up comfortably against the isolated pawn. To try to make it work Jobava kept sacrificing material, which Jakovenko simply kept taking. When it was clear that White had nothing for his bishop deficit he resigned.

Jakovenko and Jobava in their post-mortem, which you will
be able to find at the official website in a few hours

Standings

Round Three Games

Select from the dropdown menu to replay the games

Photos from the official website by Maria Emelianova

Schedule

Round 01 – February 15, 2015 - 15:00
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Svidler, Peter 2739
0-1
Giri, Anish 2797
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
0-1
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
0-1
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
½-½
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
1-0
Jobava, Baadur 2696
Round 02 –February 16, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
½-½
Jobava, Baadur 2696
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
½-½
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
0-1
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Giri, Anish 2797
½-½
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
½-½
Svidler, Peter 2739
Round 03 –February 17, 2015 - 15:00
Svidler, Peter 2739
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
½-½
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
½-½
Giri, Anish 2797
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
0-1
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
1-0
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Jobava, Baadur 2696
0-1
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Round 04 –February 18, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731   Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Grischuk, Alexander 2810   Jobava, Baadur 2696
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759   Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Giri, Anish 2797   Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Dominguez, Leinier 2726   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Svidler, Peter 2739   Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Round 05 –February 20, 2015 - 15:00
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775   Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705   Svidler, Peter 2739
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737   Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716   Giri, Anish 2797
Jobava, Baadur 2696   Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733   Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Round 06 –February 21, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731   Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759   Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Giri, Anish 2797   Jobava, Baadur 2696
Dominguez, Leinier 2726   Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Svidler, Peter 2739   Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Round 07 –February 22, 2015 - 15:00
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705   Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737   Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716   Svidler, Peter 2739
Jobava, Baadur 2696   Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733   Giri, Anish 2797
Grischuk, Alexander 2810   Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Round 08 –February 23, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731   Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Giri, Anish 2797   Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Dominguez, Leinier 2726   Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Svidler, Peter 2739   Jobava, Baadur 2696
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775   Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705   Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Round 09 –February 25, 2015 - 15:00
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737   Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Jobava, Baadur 2696   Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733   Svidler, Peter 2739
Grischuk, Alexander 2810   Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759   Giri, Anish 2797
Round 10 –February 26, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731   Giri, Anish 2797
Dominguez, Leinier 2726   Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Svidler, Peter 2739   Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775   Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705   Jobava, Baadur 2696
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737   Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Round 11 –February 27, 2015 - 13:00
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716   Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Jobava, Baadur 2696   Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Grischuk, Alexander 2810   Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759   Svidler, Peter 2739
Giri, Anish 2797   Dominguez, Leinier 2726

Links

The games will be broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 13 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.



Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
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