Tbilisi Rd1: Giri newest 2800!

by Alejandro Ramirez
2/15/2015 – What a way to start the tournament in Tbilisi! Four decisive games, three of them victories by the black pieces! Most of the games had something in common: mistakes in already difficult positions. Giri beat Svidler to become the ninth person in history to cross the 2800 barrier in the live ratings. Grischuk also hit a new personal best, with 2813.6 Round one report.

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The third stage of the 2014-2015 FIDE Grand Prix is taking place in Tbilisi, Georgia. The tournament will run from February 14th to February 28, 2014. Some of the strongest players in the world will compete in a Round Robin event. The winner and runner-up of the Grand Prix series will earn their spot at the 2016 Candidate's Tournament.

Round One

Round 01 – February 15, 2015 - 15:00
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Svidler, Peter 2739
0-1
Giri, Anish 2797
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
0-1
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
0-1
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
½-½
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
1-0
Jobava, Baadur 2696

What a great way to open the tournament in Tbilisi. Four decisive games, two people reaching their new highest ratings!

Dominguez, Leinier ½-½ Radjabov, Teimour
Not much to say about this game; an anti-Berlin that is known for its drawish tendencies gave Dominguez the pair of bishops and little else. Radjabov had no problems holding a draw today.

Svidler, Peter 0-1 Anish, Giri
The Dutch player clearly outplayed his Russian counterpart, but Svidler was doing a good job of keeping the game around equal despite his structural weakness on the kingside. That is until he blundered majorly:

[Event "Tbilisi FIDE Grand Prix"] [Site "Tbilisi GEO"] [Date "2015.02.15"] [Round "1"] [White "Svidler, P."] [Black "Giri, A."] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D38"] [WhiteElo "2739"] [BlackElo "2797"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "3Q1bk1/5ppp/p3q3/1p6/2r4P/P1B2P2/1P3P2/3R2K1 b - - 0 28"] [PlyCount "3"] [EventDate "2015.02.14"] 28... Qf5 29. Qa8 $4 (29. Rd4 $1 $11) 29... Rxh4 {Now White is down a pawn and nearly getting mated.} 0-1

Giri is the new member of the exclusive 2800 club!

Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 0-1 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar
A very complex Najdorf, but one that very obviously did not go in favor of MVL. His position out of the opening was somewhat dicey, with his king making a long treck from e1 to b1... and not by castling long! Mamedyarov mounted pressure until MVL collapsed. A couple of mistakes later the Frenchman found himself getting mated and down a fair amount of material.

MVL was one of three players to lose with white today

Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 0-1 Grischuk, Alexander
The Noteboom is one of the openings that is known to always give unbalanced positions. Kasimdzhanov might have had chances for an advantage at certain points, though the game was very complex. Once Grischuk gained activity with his rooks and passed pawns it was time for White to draw the game, but Kasimdzhanov did not see how:

[Event "Tbilisi FIDE Grand Prix"] [Site "Tbilisi GEO"] [Date "2015.02.15"] [Round "1"] [White "Kasimdzhanov, R."] [Black "Grischuk, A."] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D31"] [WhiteElo "2705"] [BlackElo "2810"] [PlyCount "70"] [EventDate "2015.02.14"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 dxc4 5. e3 b5 6. a4 c6 7. Bd2 a5 8. axb5 Bxc3 9. Bxc3 cxb5 10. b3 Bb7 11. bxc4 b4 12. Bb2 Nf6 13. Bd3 Nbd7 14. O-O O-O 15. Re1 Ne4 16. c5 Bc6 17. Qc2 f5 18. Bc4 Qe7 19. Bb3 Kh8 20. Red1 Qe8 21. Ba4 Bxa4 22. Rxa4 Ndf6 23. Rda1 Qb5 24. Ne5 Ng4 25. Nxg4 fxg4 26. Qxe4 Qe2 27. Rf1 Qxb2 28. Qxe6 b3 29. Qc4 Rf6 30. Qc1 Qe2 31. c6 $2 (31. Qc4 $1 $11 {he point is that the trade of queens, somewhat surprisingly, does not favor Black. White's passed pawns on the center would be ready to roll while his own passed pawns will not be able to push further from a4 and b3.} Qxc4 $2 (31... Qb2 32. Qc1 $1 $11) (31... Qd2 32. Qxb3 (32. Qc1 $11) 32... Raf8 33. f4 $1 gxf3 34. Ra2 $11) 32. Rxc4 a4 33. Rb4 $1 $16) 31... b2 32. Qc4 Qd2 33. c7 Rc8 34. Qb3 Rcf8 35. Qd1 Rxf2 0-1

Almost a draw, but time pressure cost Kasimdzhanov half a point

Andreikin, Dmitry ½-½ Jakovenko, Dmitry
The same anti-Berlin employed in Dominguez-Radjabov, with basically the same result.

The duel of the Dmitrys (Andreikin photographed above) ended in a peaceful draw

Tomashevsky, Evgeny 1-0 Jobava, Baadur
The game was decided in the following tactical sequence:

Tomashevsky won against a clearly out of form Jobava

[Event "Tbilisi FIDE Grand Prix"] [Site "Tbilisi GEO"] [Date "2015.02.15"] [Round "1"] [White "Tomashevsky, E."] [Black "Jobava, Ba"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E70"] [WhiteElo "2716"] [BlackElo "2696"] [PlyCount "94"] [EventDate "2015.02.14"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 O-O 5. Nf3 c6 6. Be2 d5 7. e5 Ne4 8. O-O Nxc3 9. bxc3 Nd7 10. a4 Nb6 11. cxd5 cxd5 12. Qb3 Qc7 13. Nd2 Be6 14. a5 Nd7 15. c4 Nxe5 $5 {Unexpected complications come out of this sacrifice. Many of White's pieces would be hanging if the knight is taken.} 16. cxd5 (16. dxe5 $2 Qxe5 $17 {with a1 and e2 currently under attack.}) 16... Ng4 {Saving the knight for now as h2 is checkmate!} 17. Qh3 $5 (17. Nf3 Bf5 18. Ba3 $13) 17... Bxd4 $2 (17... Nxf2 $1 18. Qh4 Ng4 $1 (18... Bg4 $5) 19. dxe6 Bxd4+ 20. Kh1 Bxa1 21. Qxg4 f5 22. Qf3 {and the two pieces should give White some advantage over the rook and two pawns. In the long run it looks like a difficult position for Black, but it certainly would have given Jobava good chances to hold on.}) 18. dxe6 Nxf2 19. Rxf2 (19. Qh4 {would simply transpose to the variation given above, but White has better choices now.}) 19... fxe6 20. Qxe6+ Kh8 21. Bb2 $1 (21. Nf3 Bxa1 22. Be3 $14) 21... Bxb2 22. Rxf8+ Rxf8 23. Rf1 { White is simply up a piece. True, Black gets to passed pawns on the queenside, but it's very difficult to draw this position.} Rxf1+ 24. Nxf1 Qxa5 25. Qxe7 Qf5 26. Ne3 Qc8 27. Bg4 Qb8 28. Nd5 b5 29. Bd7 a6 30. g3 Bg7 31. Kg2 Qf8 32. Qe4 Qd6 33. Bc8 a5 34. Qe8+ Qf8 35. Qxf8+ Bxf8 36. Bd7 b4 37. Ba4 Bd6 38. Kf3 Kg7 39. h3 h5 40. Bc2 g5 41. g4 hxg4+ 42. hxg4 Kf7 43. Ke4 Ke6 44. Bb3 Kd7 45. Ba4+ Ke6 46. Nb6 Bc7 47. Nc4 Bd8 1-0

Standings

Round One Games

Select from the dropdown menu to replay the games

Photos from the official website by Anastasiya Karlovich

Schedule

Round 01 – February 15, 2015 - 15:00
Dominguez, Leinier 2726
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Svidler, Peter 2739
0-1
Giri, Anish 2797
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
0-1
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
0-1
Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
½-½
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
1-0
Jobava, Baadur 2696
Round 02 –February 16, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731   Jobava, Baadur 2696
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733   Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Grischuk, Alexander 2810   Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Giri, Anish 2797   Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Dominguez, Leinier 2726   Svidler, Peter 2739
Round 03 –February 17, 2015 - 15:00
Svidler, Peter 2739   Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775   Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705   Giri, Anish 2797
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737   Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716   Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Jobava, Baadur 2696   Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Round 04 –February 18, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731   Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Grischuk, Alexander 2810   Jobava, Baadur 2696
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759   Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Giri, Anish 2797   Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Dominguez, Leinier 2726   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Svidler, Peter 2739   Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Round 05 –February 20, 2015 - 15:00
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775   Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705   Svidler, Peter 2739
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737   Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716   Giri, Anish 2797
Jobava, Baadur 2696   Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733   Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Round 06 –February 21, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731   Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759   Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Giri, Anish 2797   Jobava, Baadur 2696
Dominguez, Leinier 2726   Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Svidler, Peter 2739   Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Round 07 –February 22, 2015 - 15:00
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705   Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737   Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716   Svidler, Peter 2739
Jobava, Baadur 2696   Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733   Giri, Anish 2797
Grischuk, Alexander 2810   Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Round 08 –February 23, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731   Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Giri, Anish 2797   Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Dominguez, Leinier 2726   Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Svidler, Peter 2739   Jobava, Baadur 2696
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775   Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705   Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Round 09 –February 25, 2015 - 15:00
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737   Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Jobava, Baadur 2696   Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733   Svidler, Peter 2739
Grischuk, Alexander 2810   Dominguez, Leinier 2726
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759   Giri, Anish 2797
Round 10 –February 26, 2015 - 15:00
Radjabov, Teimour 2731   Giri, Anish 2797
Dominguez, Leinier 2726   Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759
Svidler, Peter 2739   Grischuk, Alexander 2810
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775   Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705   Jobava, Baadur 2696
Andreikin, Dmitry 2737   Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716
Round 11 –February 27, 2015 - 13:00
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2716   Radjabov, Teimour 2731
Jobava, Baadur 2696   Andreikin, Dmitry 2737
Jakovenko, Dmitry 2733   Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2705
Grischuk, Alexander 2810   Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2775
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2759   Svidler, Peter 2739
Giri, Anish 2797   Dominguez, Leinier 2726

Links

The games will be broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 13 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.



Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
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