Tashkent R10: Mamedyarov and Morozevich lead in penultimate round

12/3/2012 – Although there has not been the highest rate of decisive games in this event, it hasn't been lacking in drama with so many changes in guard. Karjakin had snuck up to take sole lead only to lose it to his victor Mamedyarov. Morozevich has shown great resilience, refusing to stay down as he rejoined the lead with a nice win over Leko. Full report with GM commentary.

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The second stage of the 2012-2013 FIDE Grand Prix Series is taking place from November 21 to December 5th in the Gallery of Fine Art in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The games start at 14:00h local time (= 10:00h CET, 13:00h Moscow, 04:00 a.m. New York). The tournament has a prize fund of 240,000 Euros.

Round ten report

Round 10 on Monday 3.12.2012 at 14:00
Kamsky Gata 2762
½-½
Svidler Peter 2747
Morozevich Alexander 2748
1-0
Leko Peter 2732
Caruana Fabiano 2786
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
Gelfand Boris 2751
½-½
Wang Hao 2737
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
1-0
Karjakin Sergey 2775
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
1-0
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726


The playing hall at the start of round ten

Morozevich-Leko 1-0: A sharp line of English opening led to an unbalanced position right from the start. Morozevich played the less popular but interesting 10.Bd2. “I believe that Black’s position is not worse after the opening but I just wanted to get a bit complicated position”, he explained.

Commentary by GM Alejandro Ramirez

[Event "FIDE Grand Prix-Tashkent 2012"] [Site "Tashkent"] [Date "2012.12.03"] [Round "10"] [White "Morozevich, Alexander"] [Black "Leko, Peter"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A33"] [WhiteElo "2748"] [BlackElo "2732"] [Annotator "Ramirez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "83"] [EventDate "2012.??.??"] [EventCountry "UZB"] 1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 e6 6. g3 Qb6 7. Nb3 Ne5 8. e4 Bb4 9. Qe2 d6 10. Bd2 (10. f4 Nc6 11. Be3 Qc7 12. Bg2 Bxc3+ 13. bxc3 b6 14. e5 $1 {lead to White winning in Lenderman-Chirila, UTD GM 2012}) 10... a5 11. f4 Nc6 12. Be3 Qc7 13. Bg2 {White is a full tempo behind the game mentioned above, but it isn't clear that a5 is all that useful.} a4 14. Nd2 Bxc3 15. bxc3 b6 { The typical battle between the bishops and the knights, where the knights have the advantage of the pawn structure. The position is very unclear.} 16. Rb1 Nd7 17. Qf2 Rb8 18. O-O O-O 19. g4 $5 {This plan of killing Black on the kingside almost never works. Almost.} Ba6 20. Qh4 Rfe8 21. Rf3 Nf8 22. Rh3 b5 $2 (22... Na5 $1 {looks scary, but should have been played.}) 23. e5 dxe5 $2 (23... bxc4 24. Be4 g6 25. f5 Rxb1+ 26. Bxb1 exf5 27. gxf5 Rxe5 {is only unclear.}) 24. Be4 {White's threat on h7 is surprisingly hard to meet.} h6 (24... g6 25. f5 $18) 25. f5 $1 f6 26. Bxh6 gxh6 27. Qxh6 {The onslaught is unstoppable without giving back material. Leko does just this, but the ensuing endgame is hopeless. } Qa7+ (27... bxc4 28. Qh8+ Kf7 29. Rh7+ $18) 28. Kg2 Qg7 29. Bxc6 Qxh6 30. Rxh6 Red8 31. Ne4 Kg7 32. Rxf6 Rdc8 33. cxb5 $1 {Apparently 'falling' for a trick - this move wins the game quicker than any alternative.} Rxc6 34. bxc6 Rxb1 35. fxe6 {The pawns are unstoppable!} Bd3 (35... Nh7 36. e7 Nxf6 37. Nxf6 $18) 36. e7 Bxe4+ 37. Kg3 Ng6 38. e8=Q Kxf6 {Black has sufficient compensation for the queen in terms of material, but not for the two queens Morozevich will have after pushing his c-pawn!} 39. Qd8+ Kf7 40. c7 Rb2 41. Qd7+ Kf6 42. g5+ { Winning the e4 bishop for free and ending resistance. Morozevich's games are wonderful in that he can spring an attack from almost nothing.} 1-0


The press conference after the end of each game


Alexander Morozevich analysing has game with press chief Anastasiya Karlovich

Kamsky-Svidler 1/2-1/2: A game started with the unusual 1.g3, although Peter Svidler had “an explanation” which he shared during the press conference. The Russian player was prepared to play the Pirc Defence against the usual 1.e4 of his opponent, but Gata Kamsky was just faster. Both players were sure they were playing a fresh position, but in fact only 13...Nfg4 appears to be a novelty. Black won a pawn but took strategical risks as White's compensation looked really dangerous. Svidler considered the 16th move to be a critical point in the game as he spent a lot of time calculating 16.f3!?, while Kamsky instead played 16.Bd2 almost without thinking. The resulting endgame looks close to equal, perhaps White could have tried 19.f4 with some chances to complicate the position, as after the game continuation Black and managed to equalize quite easily.

Caruana-Kazimdzanov 1/2-1/2: Another Anti-Marshall, this time with 8.d3 and 9. a4 – not the most popular but quite a logical line. Once again Rustam Kazimdzanov (above right, in the press conference) seemed to be very well prepared and, facing Fabiano's novelty 15.Ne3, managed not only to equalize but to get a slightly better endgame. Facing difficulties Fabiano Caruana decided to sacrifice a pawn. However he could have regretted his decision if Black had found 32...Nge7. It seems that after 33.Ke2 Rd8 34.Bxc5 Nd5 Black is simply better. During the press conference the former FIDE world champion pointed out that his first idea was to play 32…Nf4, but he didn’t see that after 33.Bf4 he had Rf3. Rustam was under time pressure and decided to return the material after 33...h5. White's 41.Ng5 was the beginning of a forced line which simplified the position. After that there wasn't much chance to win this game for any of the opponents.

Ponomariov-Dominguez 1-0: Ruslan Ponomariov chose a classical Closed Sicilian variation, with his bishop on g2, trying to get a complex position and to avoid the main lines. Leinier Dominguez played quite logically and his position even looked better after 21...Nd4, however it was still very complicated and the Ukrainian grandmaster managed to outplay his opponent in a mutual time trouble. After Ponomariov's 26.Nh5! White had a lot of tactical possibilities, tried to create one threat after another. It was quite hard for the Cuban player to defend his position in the practical game. After 29...Nb6? White's advantage was already huge, while the nice tactical decision 33.Rxe7 finished the game very quickly.

Gelfand-Wang Hao 1/2-1/2: Boris Gelfand (above) played his favorite Catalan and Wang Hao repeated the line with 4...dxc4 and 5...a6, as in his game against Kamsky. Boris went his own way and came up with a novelty, 11.Nbd2, which seems an improvement of White's play from recent Giri-Naidich game (Eilat 2012). Wang Hao managed to find a tricky way to keep his dark squared bishop from exchange (15...Bd4!, 16...Bf5!) and White had just a marginal edge. Once again, when it came to tactics Wang Hao found a nice resource to keep the position balanced – 27...c5 with the key idea 30...Qxf2!, and after precise 33...Re5 Black had no difficulties to hold an endgame. Perhaps the best practical chance for Gelfand was to play 35. Ke2.


Wang Hao and Boris Gelfand in the press conference

Mamedyarov-Karjakin 1-0: Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (above left) chose to play the Queens Indian with 5.Qa4, as he didn’t cherish a hope to catch Sergey Karjakin in the opening. He tried to get a playable position and leave as many pieces on the board as its possible. “After I played g4, h4, Sergey started to play inaccurately and of course ...a6 was a big mistake! The endgame is very comfortable for White to play!” the Azeri player pointed out. White started to increase his advantage, and later on could have ended with an extra exchange, but Shakh came to conclusion that Black had good chances to defend that position. A few moves later it was White's turn to exchange his rook for a bishop and two central passed pawns. On the 41st move Sergey got his last chance to survive by playing 41…Rh4. Instead he chose quite passive Rc8, and Shakhriyar showed confident way for the victory.

Replay all the games of this round on our Javascript board

Standings after ten rounds

Summaries from the official web site, photos by Anastasiya Karlovich

Schedule and results

Round 1 on Thursday 22.11.2012 at 14:00
Morozevich Alexander 2748
1-0
Kamsky Gata 2762
Caruana Fabiano 2786
½-½
Svidler Peter 2747
Gelfand Boris 2751
½-½
Leko Peter 2732
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
½-½
Wang Hao 2737
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726
0-1
Karjakin Sergey 2775
Round 2 on Friday, 23.11.2012 at 14:00
Kamsky Gata 2762
½-½
Karjakin Sergey 2775
Wang Hao 2737
½-½
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
½-½
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
Leko Peter 2732
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
Svidler Peter 2747
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2751
Morozevich Alexander 2748
1-0
Caruana Fabiano 2786
Round 3 on Saturday 24.11.2012 at 14:00
Caruana Fabiano 2786
1-0
Kamsky Gata 2762
Gelfand Boris 2751
½-½
Morozevich Alexander 2748
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
1-0
Svidler Peter 2747
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
½-½
Leko Peter 2732
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
Karjakin Sergey 2775
½-½
Wang Hao 2737
Round 4 on Sunday 25.11.2012 at 14:00
Kamsky Gata 2762
0-1
Wang Hao 2737
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
½-½
Karjakin Sergey 2775
Leko Peter 2732
½-½
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726
Svidler Peter 2747
1-0
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
Morozevich Alexander 2748
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
Caruana Fabiano 2786
1-0
Gelfand Boris 2751
Round 5 on Tuesday 27.11.2012 at 14:00
Gelfand Boris 2751
0-1
Kamsky Gata 2762
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
½-½
Caruana Fabiano 2786
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
1-0
Morozevich Alexander 2748
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726
½-½
Svidler Peter 2747
Karjakin Sergey 2775
½-½
Leko Peter 2732
Wang Hao 2737
0-1
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
Round 6 on Wednesday 28.11.2012 at 14:00
Kamsky Gata 2762
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
Leko Peter 2732
½-½
Wang Hao 2737
Svidler Peter 2747
½-½
Karjakin Sergey 2775
Morozevich Alexander 2748
1-0
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726
Caruana Fabiano 2786
½-½
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
Gelfand Boris 2751
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
Round 7 on Thursday 29.11.2012 at 14:00
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
½-½
Kamsky Gata 2762
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2751
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726
0-1
Caruana Fabiano 2786
Karjakin Sergey 2775
1-0
Morozevich Alexander 2748
Wang Hao 2737
½-½
Svidler Peter 2747
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
½-½
Leko Peter 2732
Round 8 on Friday 30.11.2012 at 14:00
Kamsky Gata 2762
0-1
Leko Peter 2732
Svidler Peter 2747
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
Morozevich Alexander 2748
½-½
Wang Hao 2737
Caruana Fabiano 2786
½-½
Karjakin Sergey 2775
Gelfand Boris 2751
½-½
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
½-½
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
Round 9 on Sunday 2.12.2012 at 14:00
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
½-½
Kamsky Gata 2762
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
Karjakin Sergey 2775
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2751
Wang Hao 2737
1-0
Caruana Fabiano 2786
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
½-½
Morozevich Alexander 2748
Leko Peter 2732
½-½
Svidler Peter 2747
Round 10 on Monday 3.12.2012 at 14:00
Kamsky Gata 2762
½-½
Svidler Peter 2747
Morozevich Alexander 2748
1-0
Leko Peter 2732
Caruana Fabiano 2786
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
Gelfand Boris 2751
½-½
Wang Hao 2737
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
1-0
Karjakin Sergey 2775
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
1-0
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726
Round 11 on Tuesday 4.12.2012 at 12:00
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726
-
Kamsky Gata 2762
Karjakin Sergey 2775
-
Ponomariov Ruslan 2741
Wang Hao 2737
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2696
-
Gelfand Boris 2751
Leko Peter 2732
-
Caruana Fabiano 2786
Svidler Peter 2747
-
Morozevich Alexander 2748

Video Reports

Live video coverage with English language commentary is available on the player above. There is also Russian commentary on the video page of the tournament site.

Links

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