Svidler, Lastin lead in Russian Super Final

10/5/2008 – The Russian Championship, which for some years now has been called the "Super Final", is taking place as a 12-player round robin from October 3-15 in the Moscow Central Chess Club. After two rounds Peter Svidler and Alexander Lastin lead, each having won both his games. Svidler scored a fine black win against top seed Alexander Morozevich. Round two report.

Russian Championship Super Final

The Russian Championship Super Final is taking place from October 3rd to 15th in the Moscow Central Chess Club. Participants are the top players by rating and qualifiers from the higher league competitions. The rate of play is 100 minutes for 40 moves, then 50 minutes for 20 moves, and then 15 minutes and a 30 second increment per move to end the game. Players cannot offer draws directly to their opponents but have to do so through an arbiter. Play starts at 15:00h local Moscow time (13:00 CEST, 07:00 New York). The prize fund is five million roubles, which translates to 139,000 Euros or US $193,000.

The participants are:

Alexander Morozevich 2787   Alexander Riazantse 2656
Dmitry Jakovenko 2737   Alexander Lastin 2651
Peter Svidler 2727   Evgeny Tomashevsky 2646
Evgeny Alekseev 2715   Konstantin Sakaev* 2640
Artyom Timofeev 2670   Nikita Vitiugov 2638
Ernesto Inarkiev 2669   Konstantin Maslak 2544
* Konstantin Sakaev jumped in for Alexander Grischuk who fell ill before the event


All the players, arbiters and technical organisers of the Super Final

Round one

Round 1: Friday, 3rd October 2008
Peter Svidler 
1-0
 Ernesto Inarkiev
Nikita Vitiugov 
½-½
 Evgeny Alekseev
Konstantin Sakaev 
0-1
 Alexander Morozevich
Artyom Timofeev 
½-½
 Dmitry Jakovenko
Alexander Lastin 
1-0 
 Evgeny Tomashevsky
Konstantin Maslak 
0-1 
 Alexander Riazantse

Lastin-Tomashevsky was probably the most interesting and complicated game of the round. Toma stood better until a blunder turned the position into a lost one immediately.

Lastin,A (2651) - Tomashevsky,E (2646) [C78]
ch-RUS Moscow RUS (1), 03.10.2008
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bb7 7.Re1 Bc5 8.c3 d6 9.d4 Bb6 10.a4 0-0 11.Bg5 h6 12.Bh4 g5 13.Bg3 Re8 14.axb5 axb5 15.Rxa8 Bxa8 16.h4 g4 17.Nh2 Qd7 18.h5 exd4 19.Bh4 Kg7 20.Nd2 dxc3 21.Bxf6+ Kxf6 22.Nxg4+ Kg7 23.bxc3 Ne5 24.Ne3 Kh7 25.Nf3 Nxf3+ 26.Qxf3 Bxe4 27.Qf4 Bxe3 28.Rxe3 Bb1 29.Rf3 f5 30.Qc1 Be4 31.Rg3 f4 32.Qxf4 Qf5 33.Qe3 Qxh5 34.Qd2 Qf5 35.f3 Bb1 36.Qd4 Qe5 37.Qh4 Bf5 38.f4 Qe1+ 39.Kh2

After 39...Qe2 the position should be a draw. However: 39...Bg6?? 40.Qf6 and Black has no real defence against the threatened mate in two. 1-0.


Peter Svidler vs Ernesto Inarkiev in round one (1-0 in 42 moves)

In Svidler-Inarkiev Black did not emerge from the opening alive and was lost after 20 moves. In Sakaev-Morozevich White seemed to have some initiative in the middlegame, but was outplayed quickly once the queens had been exchanged. In Vitiugov-Alekseev White avoided a repetition of moves on move 18, but fell into a bad position and only drew after a long and very tough defence.

Round two

Round 2: Saturday, 4th October 2008
Alexander Morozevich 
0-1
 Peter Svidler
Evgeny Alekseev 
1-0
 Artyom Timofeev
Alexander Riazantse 
½-½
 Konstantin Sakaev
Alexander Lastin 
1-0
 Konstantin Maslak
Evgeny Tomashevsky 
½-½
 Dmitry Jakovenko
Ernesto Inarkiev 
0-1 
 Nikita Vitiugov

The game of the day was Morozevich-Svidler, which did not take the course the world's number two ranked player (who certainly has ambitions to climb to the final rung) intended for it.

Morozevich,A (2787) - Svidler,P (2727) [A20]
ch-RUS Moscow RUS (2), 04.10.2008
1.c4 e5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Nc3 Nb6 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.0-0 Be7 8.d3 0-0 9.a4 a5 10.Be3 Be6 11.Nd2 Nd5 12.Nxd5 Bxd5 13.Bxd5 Qxd5 14.Qb3 Nb4N. A new idea by Peter Svidler. 15.Rfc1 Qd7 16.Ne4 b6 17.Bd2 c6 18.Bc3 Qc7 19.Qc4 Nd5 20.Nd2 Rfe8 21.Qe4 Bc5 22.Nf3 Bd6 23.Ng5 Nf6 24.Qf5 h6 25.Nf3 Re6 26.Rc2 Nd5 27.Rac1 Rae8 28.Bd2 Bb4 29.Bxb4 Nxb4 30.Rc4 c5 31.Nd2 Qd7 32.b3 Nc6 33.Qh5 Nd4 34.Re1

34...e4 35.dxe4 Re5 36.Qh4 Nf5 37.exf5 Qxd2 38.Rf1 Rxe2 39.Qg4 Qd3 40.f6 g6 41.Rcc1 Qxb3. Black is now a pawn up with excellent winning chances. 42.Rb1 Qe6 43.Qf4 Re4 44.Qc7 Rb4 45.Rbd1 Qxf6. The second pawn falls. 46.Rd6 Qe7 47.Rd7 Qe6 48.Rfd1 Re4 49.Kg2 Rxa4. Now Black is three (count them) pawns up. 50.R7d6 Qf5 51.R1d3 Ra1 52.Rd8

52...Rae1? Exchanging on d8 was certainly better. 53.Rf3 Qe6 54.Rxe8+ Qxe8 55.Qxb6 a4 56.Qxc5. White has picked up two pawns and left Black to win this with his distant passed a-pawn. 56...Qa8 57.Qc3 Rb1 58.Qc4 Rb7 59.Qd5 Ra7 60.Qxa8+ Rxa8

Peter Svidler now has to mobilise all his endgame skill to obtain the full point. Fortunately for him he has a great deal of skill. 61.Ra3 f5 62.Kf3 Kf7 63.Ke3 Ke6 64.Kd4 g5 65.Re3+ Kd6 66.Ra3 g4 67.Kc4 Ke5 68.Re3+ Kf6 69.Ra3 h5 70.Kd4 Ra7 71.f4 h4 72.gxh4 Re7 73.Kd3 Re4 74.Rc3 Kg6 75.Rc8 Rxf4 76.Rg8+ Kf7 77.Ra8 Rf2 78.Ke3 Rxh2 79.Rxa4 Kg6 80.Ra8 Rxh4 81.Kf4

White has reached a position he knows he can win. 81...Rh3 82.Ra6+ Kh5 83.Kxf5 Rf3+ 84.Ke4 Kh4 85.Ra1 Kh3 86.Rg1 Ra3 87.Kf4 g3 0-1.


A setback in his quest for first place: Alexander Morozevich

Standings after two rounds


Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member of Playchess you should download ChessBase Light, which is free and gives you immediate access. You can use the program to read, replay and analyse PGN games.


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