Sinquefield 01: Five decisives games!

by Alejandro Ramirez
8/24/2015 – What a scintillating start to the 2015 Sinquefield Cup! We could not have asked for more: a round full of brilliancies, attacks, and many confusing moves! Topalov beat Carlsen again, and it was not the only repeat performance... Giri also beat Grischuk, like in Norway! Anand was unable to hold against Nakamura, while So commited suicide against MVL while Aronian played a brilliancy.

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2015 Sinquefield Cup

This super-GM single Round Robin brings together some of the best players in the world. This is the second leg of the Grand Chess Tour.

The players – Magnus Carlsen (Norway), Levon Aronian (Armenia), Fabiano Caruana (USA), Hikaru Nakamura (USA), Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria), Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (France), Alexander Grischuk (Russia), Anish Giri (Netherlands), Viswanathan Anand (India), Wesley So (USA).

The venue is the Chess Club and Scholastic Center at 4657 Maryland Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63108. Tickets can be purchased at the Saint Louis Chess Club.

Round One

Round One
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Giri, Anish 2793
1-0
Grischuk, Alexander 2771
So, Wesley 2779
0-1
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2731
Aronian, Levon 2765
1-0
Caruana, Fabiano 2808
Carlsen, Magnus 2853
0-1
Topalov, Veselin 2816
Nakamura, Hikaru 2814
1-0
Anand, Viswanathan 2816

What a scintillating start to the 2015 Sinquefield Cup! We could not have asked for more: a round full of brilliancies, attacks, and many confusing moves!

The hall was a bit packed

Some needed extra assistance to see the games

The first game to finish was brilliant. Aronian smashed Caruana’s position when there was a tremendous amount of tension in the center. Caruana released it too early, the Armenian saw his opportunity and sacrificed a full rook! His devastating continuation with a quiet move, Rf1, was sufficient to topple the American’s defenses and Caruana lost soon after.

[Event "3rd Sinquefield Cup 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis"] [Date "2015.08.23"] [Round "1"] [White "Aronian, Levon"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D37"] [WhiteElo "2765"] [BlackElo "2808"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "77"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "USA"] [TimeControl "40/7200:3600+30"] 1. d4 {3} Nf6 {7} 2. c4 {5} e6 {4} 3. Nf3 {4} d5 {7} 4. Nc3 {4} Be7 {5} 5. Bf4 {5} O-O {12} 6. e3 {11} Nbd7 {61} 7. c5 {16} Ne4 8. Rc1 Nxc3 {6} 9. Rxc3 {4} b6 {17} 10. c6 {6} Nf6 {4} 11. a3 {3} a5 {29} 12. Bd3 {59} Ne4 {16} 13. Rc2 {32} f6 {32 The first deviation of the game. 12...Ba6 has been played before by Caruana (against Giri in Wijk aan Zee). Although the game was drawn, his position was a little suspicious.} 14. Qe2 {157} Bd6 {55} 15. O-O {246} g5 $5 { 29 Black didn't want to capture on f4, so he forces White to capture himself!} (15... Bxf4 16. exf4 $6 {leaves the e6 pawn weak in the long run, and e5 will never be achieved.}) 16. Bxd6 {421} Nxd6 {9} 17. Re1 {4} a4 {744} 18. Nd2 {116} e5 $5 {243} 19. e4 $1 {208 Creating serious tension on the center...} f5 $1 { 871 A funny looking move! The tension accumulates, but Black is ok no matter which pawn Aronian takes.} 20. f3 {473} (20. dxe5 fxe4 (20... Nxe4 $5) 21. exd6 exd3 22. Qxd3 Qxd6 $13) (20. exd5 $2 e4 $15) 20... dxe4 $6 {902 Releasing the tension at the wrong moment.} (20... Re8 $1) 21. fxe4 {30} Ra5 $2 {124 Caruana underestimates White's attack and allows a brilliancy!} (21... exd4 22. e5 Re8 $14) 22. exf5 {761} Nxf5 {1054} 23. Bc4+ {109} Kg7 {8} 24. d5 {4 Now e5 is very weak.} Re8 {7} 25. Ne4 {780 Perhaps Fabiano underestimated this move? The knight is magnificently placed and Nd4 doesn't work...} Nd4 {376} 26. Qh5 $1 { 8 The point.} Nxc2 {409 otherwise he is just lost} 27. Nxg5 {179} Bf5 {245} 28. Rf1 {172 Simple and sufficient. Black is up a rook, but Black simply cannot defend his position:} Qf6 {798} (28... Bg6 29. Rf7+ Kg8 (29... Bxf7 30. Qxh7+ Kf6 31. Ne4+ Ke7 32. d6+ {and Black gets mated.}) 30. Qh6 $18) 29. Ne6+ {7} ( 29. Rxf5 Qxf5 30. Ne6+ {seemed easier, but everything wins.}) 29... Rxe6 {45} 30. Rxf5 {5} Qg6 {173} 31. dxe6 {21 Being up two pawns usually forces resignation, but Black is lucky to still be alive.} (31. Rg5 $1 {Was stronger according to the computer, and flashier, but Aronian's move is winning also.}) 31... Qxh5 {32} 32. Rxh5 {5} Nd4 {115} 33. e7 {193} Ra8 {9} 34. Rxe5 {10 Two pawns is too much. Caruana flutters for a few more moves, but it is over.} Re8 {4} 35. Re4 {28} Nf5 {19} 36. Be6 {5} Nd6 {97} 37. Bd7 {7} Nxe4 {4} 38. Bxe8 {3 } Kf6 {15} 39. Bg6 {5} 1-0

A big victory for Aronian

Three games then finished almost at the same time. First, Giri finished off Grischuk with a nice novelty from a blitz game played some time ago. Grischuk was caught off guard. got low on time and his position collapsed. A clean victory for the Dutch.

[Event "3rd Sinquefield Cup 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis"] [Date "2015.08.23"] [Round "1"] [White "Giri, Anish"] [Black "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E15"] [WhiteElo "2793"] [BlackElo "2771"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "67"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "USA"] [TimeControl "40/7200:3600+30"] 1. Nf3 {3} d5 {32} 2. d4 {34} Nf6 {10} 3. c4 {4} e6 {15} 4. g3 {96} Bb4+ {98} 5. Bd2 {42} Be7 {26} 6. Bg2 {7} O-O {56} 7. O-O {7} Nbd7 {111} 8. Qc2 {49} c6 { 32} 9. Rd1 {28} b6 {36} 10. Bf4 {9} Ba6 {114} 11. b3 {43} Rc8 {179} 12. Nc3 {19 } dxc4 {767} 13. e4 {28} Nh5 {868} 14. Be3 {474} Nhf6 {43} 15. h3 {247} b5 { 1200} 16. bxc4 {77} bxc4 {203} 17. Rab1 {77} Qa5 {541} 18. Bd2 {104} Qa3 $6 { 256} (18... Qc7 {as pointed out by Giri after the game, is much better.}) 19. Re1 {74 Surprisingly, this has all been played before... in a blitz game! Anand-Leko, 2009. In that game Vishy went g4 instead of Re1. Giri was perhaps somewhat familiar with the position judging on how quickly he played, but Grischuk played, as usual, extremely slowly.} Nb6 {1678 after a long though, Grischuk makes a big mistake.} (19... Rb8 $1) 20. Re3 {367 The queen feels very uncomfortable.} Rb8 {274} 21. Rxb6 $1 {1919} (21. Nd5 cxd5 22. Rxa3 Bxa3 { is perhaps better for White, but Black has a lot of compensation for that missing queen.}) 21... Rxb6 {80} (21... axb6 22. e5 $1 Nd7 23. Nb1 {and the queen is trapped. White wins.}) 22. Na4 {44} Rb1+ $1 {287} 23. Kh2 {263} (23. Qxb1 Qxa4 {is no good for White.}) 23... c3 $1 {1 The only way to fight on} 24. Rxc3 {189} Qb4 {1} 25. Rxc6 {239} Qb5 {7} (25... Bd3 26. Qxd3 Qxa4 27. Rc7 {is dangerous for Black:} Bd8 28. Rxf7 Rxf7 29. Qxb1 $16) 26. Ne5 $1 {58} Ra1 {81} 27. Bc3 {1118} Rf1 {1} 28. Nb2 {13} (28. Bxf1 Qxf1 {gives Black way too much counterplay.}) 28... Qb7 {1} 29. Rxa6 {294} Qxa6 {8} 30. Nbc4 {13 The rook is trapped on f1!} Nxe4 {145} 31. Bxe4 {23 Three pieces are more powerful than two rooks in most situations, they coordinate much better, and you can easily see it in this position.} Rb8 {1} 32. Bxh7+ {155} Kf8 {1} 33. Qe2 {90} Rc1 {7} 34. Qh5 {58 Mate is inevitable.} 1-0

Giri: "My wife knew about 7...g5 in that Sicilian (Carlsen-Topalov) I don't know why Carlsen didn't"

Next MVL won his game against Wesley So. So’s greedy approach in the opening was severely punished. Despite having an extra pawn, his position was simply terrible. Black’s pieces were too active and controlled the board. After White had to give up his light-squared bishop for the opponent’s knight it was clear that So was just trying to survive. He was unable to do so, and MVL took his extra exchange to victory.

[Event "3rd Sinquefield Cup 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis"] [Date "2015.08.23"] [Round "1"] [White "So, Wesley"] [Black "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A34"] [WhiteElo "2779"] [BlackElo "2731"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "70"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "USA"] [TimeControl "40/7200:3600+30"] 1. Nf3 {3} Nf6 {10} 2. c4 {6} g6 {4} 3. Nc3 {6} d5 {2} 4. cxd5 {6} Nxd5 {3} 5. g3 {7} Bg7 {109} 6. Bg2 {7 c} c5 {7} 7. Qa4+ {574} Nc6 {257} 8. Ng5 {237 An unusual move, though the maneuver is well know. White wants to put his knight on e4 to target c5.} e6 {772} 9. Nge4 {61} Nb6 {34} 10. Qb5 $6 {580 Going for the pawn, this is too dangerous.} c4 {328} 11. Na4 $2 {242 White is too greedy. He will win a pawn, but his position will be awful.} (11. O-O {was a better move.}) 11... O-O {333} 12. Nxb6 {269} axb6 {135} 13. Qxc4 {184} e5 {425 White is up a pawn, but Black has a huge initiative. Be6 is coming soon, Nd4 is up in the air, and White is not close to finishing his development. So will soon be punished.} 14. Qc2 {854} Be6 {1174 Around this time So went in the confessional booth, claiming that he would have to work hard to not simply lose - he was aware that something went wrong.} 15. Nc3 {76} b5 $1 {475 A very nice move. White cannot really take on b5:} 16. Bxc6 {420} (16. Nxb5 Nb4 17. Qd1 Bd5 18. f3 Qb6 $17 {Black's position is so active and White can't even castle.}) 16... bxc6 {25} 17. b3 {115} Bf5 {266} 18. d3 {1206} (18. Qb2 b4 {is just over.}) 18... e4 $1 {222 The bishops are way too powerful. So must give back material.} 19. dxe4 {1} Bxe4 {398} 20. Nxe4 {9} (20. Qxe4 Bxc3+ $19) 20... Bxa1 {5} 21. O-O {4} Re8 {55} 22. f3 {476} Bd4+ {266} 23. e3 {190} Bg7 {194} 24. Rd1 {114} Qc7 {203} 25. Rd6 {254} c5 {68} 26. Rd5 {116} Re5 {107} 27. Rd1 { 239} c4 {236} 28. a3 {46} Re7 {259} 29. bxc4 {135} Qxc4 {66 White's position is no good, and he is down material. MVL cleans up from here.} 30. Qd2 {21} Qb3 {98} 31. Qd6 {136} Rc8 {213} 32. Nf2 {314} Rec7 {135} 33. Bd2 {2} Bf8 {7} 34. Qd4 {48} Bxa3 {60} 35. Kg2 {6} Bb2 {21} 0-1

The Frenchman punished big greed

Nakamura was trying to pressure Anand, who defended in clever ways. However the Indian player missed a couple of chances to fully equalize, and after a series of inaccuracies he saw himself unable to protect his pawn. In an awful position, but perhaps not 100% lost, Anand decided to resign.

[Event "3rd Sinquefield Cup 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis"] [Date "2015.08.23"] [Round "1"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E05"] [WhiteElo "2814"] [BlackElo "2816"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "85"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "USA"] [TimeControl "40/7200:3600+30"] 1. d4 {20} Nf6 {13} 2. c4 {9} e6 {6} 3. Nf3 {59} d5 {15} 4. g3 {16} Be7 {34} 5. Bg2 {14} O-O {11} 6. O-O {11} dxc4 {7} 7. Qc2 {9} a6 {9} 8. a4 {5} Bd7 {70} 9. Qxc4 {32} Bc6 {9} 10. Bg5 {4} Bd5 {273} 11. Qc2 {51} Be4 {468} 12. Qd1 {17} c5 {237} 13. dxc5 {32} Bxc5 {29} 14. Qxd8 {59} Rxd8 {10} 15. Nbd2 {1} Bc6 {172} 16. Nb3 {18} Be7 {82} 17. Na5 {59} h6 {220} 18. Be3 {120} Nd5 {390} 19. Bd2 { 487 Even though this position has been reached before (twice!) it seems that neither player was 100% familiar with the position. Anand finds a good equalizing plan though.} Nb6 $1 {858 The double attack on a4 and d2 (after Bxf3) is annoying. White doesn't want to take on b8 since Black's development would be seriously accelerated.} 20. Bf4 {659} Nd5 {76} 21. Ne5 {268} g5 $5 { 1016 Kicking out the bishop, but weakening the kingside. This seems to be a good move, though not the most obvious.} 22. Bd2 {263} Bf6 {112} 23. Nd3 {115} (23. Nexc6 Nxc6 24. Nxc6 bxc6 {maybe is a bit better for White, but Black's activity is considerable.}) 23... b6 {330} 24. Nc4 {101} b5 {277} 25. Bxd5 { 1443} (25. Nce5 bxa4 26. Nxc6 Nxc6 $11) 25... bxc4 {19} (25... Bxd5 26. Nb6 Ra7 27. axb5 {doesn't work.}) (25... exd5 $5) 26. Bxc4 {14} Bxb2 {21} 27. Ra2 {593 White keeps a little bit of pressure with his superior development, but Black is close to equality.} Bg7 {172} (27... Bd4 $1 28. Rc1 Be4 $11) 28. Rc1 {118} Be8 {96 A little passive, but White has to prove his advantage somehow.} 29. Nc5 {114} Bf8 {493} 30. Bd3 {171} Nc6 {321} 31. Be4 {508} Rdc8 {120} 32. Kf1 { 110} Ra7 {269 White has a little bit of pressure, but it isn't too bad for Black yet.} 33. Nb3 {642} Rac7 {169} 34. Rac2 {56} Bd6 $6 {46} (34... Ba3 $1 { Was much better} 35. Ba5 $2 {is what Anand was worried about.} Nxa5 36. Rxc7 Rxc7 37. Rxc7 Nxb3 $19 {and Black has Nd2+ as a threat, so White can't do anything.}) 35. f4 {51} f5 {177} 36. Bd3 {27} Nb8 $2 {147} (36... Rb8 $1 { keeps the game interesting, with White being a bit better.}) 37. Rxc7 {23} Rxc7 {5} 38. Rxc7 {57} Bxc7 {6} 39. fxg5 {176} hxg5 {74} 40. Nc5 {0 Now Black just loses a pawn.} Bd6 {0} 41. Nxe6 {12} Bxa4 {27} 42. Nxg5 {147} Bd7 {14} 43. Bc3 {12 Perhaps premature resignation, but Black has a horrible position and the h-pawn is rolling down the board.} 1-0

Anand could not find the precise moves to hold

Last, but certainly not least, a spectacular series of fireworks in the Carlsen-Topalov game. Topalov opened with a crazy novelty: 7...g5!? which apparently had been analyzed in an article recenntly. Carlsen sacrificed a piece for two pawns an an initiative, but the Bulgarian was unfazed. He defended well, Carlsen continued to be aggressive, but it was to no avail. The attack never crashed through, and the pawns were not enough compensation for the extra piece. In a big time scramble Topalov won with his extra material.

[Event "3rd Sinquefield Cup 2015"] [Site "Saint Louis"] [Date "2015.08.23"] [Round "1"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Topalov, Veselin"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B51"] [WhiteElo "2853"] [BlackElo "2816"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "80"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "USA"] [TimeControl "40/7200:3600+30"] 1. e4 {3} c5 {10} 2. Nf3 {6} d6 {5} 3. Bb5+ {12} Nd7 {33} 4. O-O {12} Ngf6 {106 } 5. Re1 {26} a6 {37} 6. Bd3 {34} b5 {330} 7. c4 {29} g5 $5 {15 An improvement over Carlsen-Nakamura from Zurich 2014 (rapid). The move is bold, but objectively it does look strange.} 8. Nxg5 {1756 Picking up the gauntlet! This is the most principled continuation. If Black doesn't play Ne5 and recapture on c4, he is basically down a pawn, but if he does do that c4 will be a weakness.} Ne5 {72} 9. Be2 {196} bxc4 {799} 10. Na3 $2 {1002 Played after a substantial think, White does not choose the correct continuation.} (10. Nf3 $1 Nd3 (10... Nfd7 11. Na3 {is now slightly better for White:} Nxf3+ 12. Bxf3 Ne5 13. Be2 {and Rg8 doesn't attack anything.}) 11. Bxd3 cxd3 12. e5 $1 dxe5 13. Nxe5 {and White has a dangerous initiative since Bb7 loses instantly.} Bb7 $2 14. Qa4+ Nd7 15. Nxf7 $1 Kxf7 16. Qb3+ Kg7 17. Qxb7 $18) 10... Rg8 {401} 11. Nxc4 $5 {1201 A piece sacrifice! Black has no choice but to accept it, after which Carlsen will get two pawns for a piece but some interesting initiative.} (11. f4 Nd3 12. Bxd3 cxd3 $13) (11. Nf3 Nd3 12. Bxd3 cxd3 13. Nc4 $13 (13. e5 dxe5 14. Nxe5 Qd5 $15 {is not the same at all.})) 11... Nxc4 {295} 12. d4 {6} Nb6 {896} 13. Bh5 {440} (13. dxc5 dxc5 14. Qxd8+ Kxd8 15. Nxf7+ Ke8 {is not something anyone wants to go for Black will have difficulties converting, but he has all the chances.}) 13... Nxh5 {435} 14. Qxh5 {43} Rg7 {606} (14... Rg6 { was stronger. The rook is much more active, and after} 15. Qxh7 Rg7 16. Qh8 cxd4 17. Nh7 Rxh7 18. Qxh7 e5 {Black is nearly winning.}) 15. Nxh7 {300} Qd7 $6 {301 A strange move. Black wants to develop, but it was about time to get rid of this knight on h7.} (15... Rxh7 16. Qxh7 cxd4 17. Qh8 e5 18. h4 Kd7 $1) 16. dxc5 {174} dxc5 {141} 17. e5 $6 {377} (17. Nxf8 Qh3 (17... Qg4 18. Qxg4 Rxg4 19. Nh7 f6 20. Ng5 $1) 18. Qxh3 Bxh3 19. g3 Kxf8 (19... Rg8 20. Nh7 f6 $13 { White is up two pawns, but that knight isn't going anywhere.}) 20. Bh6 {might even favor White as Black's pieces are not well coordinated.}) 17... Qc6 $1 { 1117} 18. f3 {662} Qg6 $1 {144 A very good move!} 19. Nf6+ {92} Kd8 $1 {9 Very precise. The Black king simply slides over to safety.} 20. Qxg6 {117} Rxg6 {14} 21. Ne4 {8 Black is basically up a piece for no compensation. Two pawns are not enough.} Bb7 {388} 22. h4 {26} Rc8 {174} 23. h5 {33} Rg8 {20} 24. Bd2 {65} Nc4 {100 White's position has not improved much.} 25. Bc3 {28} Bh6 {128} 26. Rad1+ {78} Ke8 {175} 27. Rd3 {120} Bf4 {37} 28. Nf2 {84} Bc6 {125} 29. Nh3 {199 } Bg3 {44} 30. Re2 {1} Bb5 {19} 31. Rd1 {1} Bc6 {82} 32. Nf2 {36} Bxe5 $1 {50 A beautiful shot in time scramble. White's position is now hopeless.} 33. Ng4 { 16} Bxc3 {9} 34. bxc3 {1} Kf8 {8} 35. Kf2 {1} Rh8 {9} 36. Ne5 {3} Nxe5 {23} 37. Rxe5 {1} Be8 {13} 38. g4 {1} f6 {7} 39. Re6 {3} Bb5 {8} 40. Rde1 {0} Rc7 {0 Magnus resigned with time pressure reached.} 0-1

Carlsen's reaction to 7...g5

Round One Games

Select from the dropdown menu to replay the games

Photos by Lennart Ootes

Pairings

Round One
Name
Rtg
Res.
Name
Rtg
Giri, Anish 2793
1-0
Grischuk, Alexander 2771
So, Wesley 2779
0-1
Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2731
Aronian, Levon 2765
1-0
Caruana, Fabiano 2808
Carlsen, Magnus 2853
0-1
Topalov, Veselin 2816
Nakamura, Hikaru 2814
1-0
Anand, Viswanathan 2816

Games start at 1 p.m. local time (20:00h CEST, 22:00h Moscow, Thursday 12:30 New Delhi, 03:00h Tokyo, 04:00 Canberra – check your location here).

Playoffs, if necessary, will be on the 2nd at 1pm.

The games will be broadcast live on Playchess, with expert analysis (see schedule below).

Broadcast Schedule

Day Date Time Event German
English
Sunday Aug. 23 1 PM Round 1 Thomas Luther   
Mihail Marin
Monday Aug. 24 1 PM Round 2 Calrstedt/Pähtz
Mihail Marin
Tuesday Aug. 25 1 PM Round 3 S. Siebrecht  
Simon Williams
Wednesday Aug. 26 1 PM Round 4 S. Siebrecht  
Simon Williams
Thursday Aug. 27 1 PM Round 5 S. Siebrecht  
Simon Williams
Friday Aug. 28 Rest Day
Saturday Aug. 29 1 PM Round 6 Reeh/Breutigam
Y. Pelletier
Sunday Aug. 30 1 PM Round 7 Reeh/Breutigam
Y. Pelletier
Monday Aug. 31 1 PM Round 8 S. Siebrecht  
Daniel King
Tuesday Sept. 1 1 PM Round 9 Y. Pelletier
Daniel King
Wednesday Sept. 2 1 PM Playoffs  
 

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
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Rational Rational 8/25/2015 01:45
Interesting point Genem about Anand's early resignations not a tournament rather than a match, but also Anand's fighting spirit is inevitably not what it was .
genem genem 8/24/2015 09:52
Anand's early resignation, in this tournament game, is a resignation that might be less likely to happen at the early move-pair 43 in a 10-game 1-on-1 *match* between these two players, Nakamura and Anand.

In the tournament each player must conserve his energy for the days yet to come. In a match, the longer game makes your opponent more tired too, not just you.
Denix Denix 8/24/2015 09:41
Almost all the underdogs by ratings won!
The_Jeh The_Jeh 8/24/2015 06:04
Bill Simmons, those numbers appear to be the number of seconds spent on each move.
Bill Simmons Bill Simmons 8/24/2015 05:38
What is up with those annoying random numbers after the moves in the game commentary?
Bill Simmons Bill Simmons 8/24/2015 05:37
What is up with those random numbers after the moves?
hserusk hserusk 8/24/2015 05:05
Yeah you need to understand that Giri is just a baby. When babies are rude, it's just they being cute and you should be going awwwwwwwwwwww...
yesenadam yesenadam 8/24/2015 04:03
What's with the "MVL" ? - Not sure why you are bugged by this hpaul. It's what everyone calls him, how he's known. Carlsen is Carlsen; Vachier-Lagrave is MVL. An affectionate nickname, and a pretty cool one if you ask me.
If anything, it's the spelling mistakes and grammar/style issues in the story that bugged me, as usual.. But well, such a great day's play, who could complain?! :-) hehe And seeing Alejandro in the confessional made me think - maybe the commentators should confess things too? ..
An Amateur An Amateur 8/24/2015 01:42
Am I the oly one thinking that Giri's remark about Topalov's ...g5 is just a bit too arogant? To use his style even my dog knows that such statements could be disturbing. Well, looking forward for Carlsen's over the board answer in their direct encounter.
stephen brady stephen brady 8/24/2015 12:59
@hserusk flash photography is allowed for the first 10 minutes only, and the fans must remain behind the rope.
hserusk hserusk 8/24/2015 11:00
stephen brady 7 hours ago
Loud playing hall?? The spectators are not allowed to speak, even a whisper. Also, according to Seirawan and others, the players enjoy playing in front of a large crowd.

- Mate, anybody and everybody who has ever played in a rated tournament knows that it's not easy playing when spectators stand so close and use their cameras etc. But I hope they weren't there all the time.
hserusk hserusk 8/24/2015 10:57
Somehow I am not feeling the love for Ramirez in this comments section.
hpaul hpaul 8/24/2015 10:08
What's with the "MVL", AR? I suggest you give the man his name, Vachier-Lagrave, or just Lagrave.
Regards,
HPL
Bobbyfozz Bobbyfozz 8/24/2015 03:46
actually, when I was there the first two years in the early rounds the spectators were relatively quiet unlike the boorish behavior of some of the spectators in Larsen-Fischer, later rounds 1971 and the first roun of Fischer-Spassky. It was virtually all juveniles who were the problem.
stephen brady stephen brady 8/24/2015 03:43
Loud playing hall?? The spectators are not allowed to speak, even a whisper. Also, according to Seirawan and others, the players enjoy playing in front of a large crowd.
stephen brady stephen brady 8/24/2015 03:43
Loud playing hall?? The spectators are not allowed to speak, even a whisper. Also, according to Seirawan and others, the players enjoy playing in front of a large crowd.
Nightplayer Nightplayer 8/24/2015 02:47
Are they really comfortable in that loud crowded hall?
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