Sergey Karjakin is the new Challenger!

by Sagar Shah
3/28/2016 – Sergey Karjakin and Fabiano Caruana went into the final round of the Candidates tied for first, with Caruana needing to win with black to qualify. That was not to be – Sergey defeated his opponent in a Sicilian Rauzer in 42 moves. With this win he became the Challenger for the World Championship in November against Magnus Carlsen. We have a detailed report from Moscow including pictures, analysis and lots of video interviews.

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The 2016 FIDE World Chess Candidates Tournament is a 14-round event, which determines the next Challenger to Magnus Carlsen's title, is taking place in Moscow from March 10–30. Eight players, including six of the World's top-ten rated grandmasters. The time control is 100 minutes for the first 40 moves, 50 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, plus an additional 30 seconds per move starting from move one. The guaranteed prize fund is US $420,000.

Daniel King on Round 14: Karjakin vs Caruana

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Sergey Karjakin is the new Challenger!

Round fourteen report from Moscow by Sagar Shah and Amruta Mokal

Everyone was looking forward to that one duel – the battle which would decide who the Challenger of Magnus Carlsen would be. Sergey Karjakin and Fabiano Caruana were tied on the same points with 7.5/13. And the best part about the last round was that they were paired against each other. Amruta and I made our way to the Central Telegraph Building, and reached half an hour before the start of the game. Of course, we did not want to miss even a single moment. Around 2.45 p.m. players started to enter the tournament hall. Here's a video that shows the environment of the playing venue ten minutes before the start of the game.

Watch the players enter the playing venue,
and also find out who the volunteers thought would become the next Challenger

It was clear that between Karjakin and Caruana, the one who would win the game would become the champion. However, what exactly would happen in case of a draw? If Anand didn't win his game then Karjakin would be champion based on his greater number of wins (second tiebreak). However, if Vishy won his battle against Svidler and reached 8.0/14, then there would be a three-way tie for first, and in that case Caruana would be the champion, based on a superior head to head result (first tiebreak) against the other two. So you can see that Sergey and Fabiano not only had to focus on their own game but also on Anand vs Svidler. Amidst all the pressure and tension the games finally began at 3 p.m.

Handshake signalling the start of the most important game of the final round. The next handshake between them will decide who the challenger to Magnus Carlsen would be. Note the smile on the faces of both the players. The stakes are high, but camaraderie still exists!

 

The number of reporters and media coverage is just amazing!

And you can see some amazing equipments!

Sergey Karjakin could have begun the game with the safe 1.Nf3 but he decided to play the opening that he has the most experience in: 1.e4. Fabiano Caruana replied with the Sicilian Defence, a natural choice. If Fabiano had gone for a safer opening and reached an equal position, and realized that Vishy was drawing his game, there would be no way to win the title. By playing the Sicilian he sent out a clear message: he didn't really care what's going on on other boards, he wanted to win this game.

The imbalanced opening position was just what Caruana needed. White's superior development against Black's central pawn mass and the bishop pair. Black's main problem in this position is his king safety. But at this level if you want to play for a win, risk is inevitable.

Karjakin's 20.b3 was quite a double edged decision. On one hand he is securing the c4 square for his bishop, on the other he is weakening his dark squares. An idea like Qe5 followed by Bg7 and f5 would be extremely dangerous. But it takes time and is not so easy to execute. At the same time opening the a-file with a5-a4 is not advisable, as then the b4 pawn becomes weak and the queen is stuck to the c5 square. As you can see this position was extremely unbalanced and difficult to play for both sides. The computer evaluation also doesn't mean much because engines often suggest moves which humans could never think of. In such a situation you need to get the opinion of a strong chess player or trainer. I went outside the press room and found the perfect person to explain the position to me. He was none other than the famous trainer Mark Dvoretsky.

World famous trainer Mark Dvoretsky's opinion on Karjakin-Caruana after 21 moves

By the third hour of play all the other three games had ended – it looked like even the other players wanted to get over with it and focus on this all important game. Anand's game against Svidler had ended in a draw. This meant that Sergey could become the champion with just a draw. However, instead of letting such external factors affect him, Karjakin played the moves that were demanded by his position.

The pawn sacrifice with e4-e5 is not something that a person who requires just a draw would play. All that Karjakin wanted was to open the lines towards the black king. Objectively speaking this position is completely fine for Black. He is not even worse. However, with the impending time pressure, it is much more difficult to play Black's position than White's.

Fabiano's 36...Re5-e4 turned out to be the crucial blunder of the game. Karjakin spotted the tactical opportunity and immediately sacrificed his rook with Rxd5! As Sergey said after the game, "This was not such a difficult move to spot." The black king was just too exposed and on the 42nd move Caruana stretched out his hand in resignation. The entire playing hall erupted: Sergey Karjakin had done it, he had become the World Championship Challenger!

The electric atmosphere in the tournament hall after Karjakin's victory

Sergey Karjakin – Fabiano Caruana 1-0

[Event "Candidates 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.03.28"]
[Round "14"]
[White "Karjakin, Sergey"]
[Black "Caruana, Fabiano"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B67"]
[WhiteElo "2760"]
[BlackElo "2794"]
[Annotator "Sagar Shah"]
[PlyCount "83"]

1. e4 {No Nf3 for today! It would be silly to say that 1.e4 is more solid than
1.Nf3, which had been Karjakin's choice in the first half of the event. But
sometimes you want to fall back on the lines which you are most comfortable
with, and for Karjakin that is 1.e4.} c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5.
Nc3 d6 {This is not the first time that Caruana has played the Classical
Sicilian, however the last time he played it was six years ago in 2009.} 6. Bg5
e6 7. Qd2 a6 8. O-O-O Bd7 9. f4 h6 10. Bh4 {Main moves here for Black are g5
and Nxe4. But Caruana goes for the relative sideline with 10...b5.} b5 11. Bxf6
gxf6 12. f5 {A top level game that reached this position was Ivanchuk-Piket
which continued h5. But Caruana is still in his preparation and goes for Qb6.} Qb6
13. fxe6 fxe6 14. Nxc6 {Karjakin tries to play as solidly as possible.} Qxc6 (
14... Bxc6 {was also possible.}) 15. Bd3 h5 16. Kb1 b4 17. Ne2 Qc5 18. Rhf1 Bh6
19. Qe1 a5 $5 {A very interesting pawn sacrifice on f6. Of course White should
be careful in taking it, because after Qe5 and Bg7 his position might just
collapse.} (19... Ke7 20. Qg3 Rag8 (20... h4 21. Qxh4 Bg5 22. Qg3 e5 23. Nf4
exf4) 21. Qf3 Rf8 22. Bxa6) 20. b3 $5 {A very double-edged move. On one hand
it weakens the dark squares and on the other it prepares Bc4. Who benefits the
most from it? The one who plays the best chess from here onwards.} (20. Rxf6 Bg7
21. Rf3 Qe5 22. c3 a4 $13) 20... Rg8 (20... a4 $6 {No matter how natural this
move looks it is a mistake because it weakens the b4 pawn. As the famous
trainer Mark Dvoretsky explains, Black wants his queen on e5, not on c5
defending the b4 pawn. That is the task of the a5 pawn!} 21. Bc4 $1 axb3 22.
Bxb3 $16) 21. g3 Ke7 (21... Qe5 {was a natural move and is met with} 22. Bc4 $1
Qxe4 23. Nd4 $1 Qxe1 24. Rfxe1 $18 {White is just better.}) 22. Bc4 Be3 23. Rf3
(23. Nf4 $5 {was a natural move and maybe better.} Bd4 24. Qd2 Bc3 25. Qd3 $16)
23... Rg4 {Caruana's position looks quite attractive on the surface. His
pieces are actively placed and he has good chances. However, his king is on e7
and that should always be kept in mind.} 24. Qf1 Rf8 25. Nf4 Bxf4 26. Rxf4 a4 (
26... Bc6 {keeping the status quo was also possible.}) 27. bxa4 $5 {A bold
decision by Sergey who is ready to ruin his structure but at the same time
realises that the bishop will sit well on b3.} Bxa4 28. Qd3 Bc6 29. Bb3 Rg5 30.
e5 $5 {The most critical moment of the game. Karjakin finds the right moment
to break through in the center. Although the position is roughly equal
the responsibility on Black's shoulders to make accurate moves has increased
sharply as his king is in the centre.} Rxe5 $1 (30... Qxe5 31. Rxb4 $14) 31.
Rc4 $5 Rd5 32. Qe2 $5 {White has sacrificed a pawn but hopes to get to the
black king in some way or the other.} (32. Qxd5 Qxd5 33. Rxd5 Bxd5 34. Rxb4 {
would result in a drawish endgame.}) 32... Qb6 33. Rh4 Re5 $6 (33... Rxd1+ 34.
Qxd1 Rh8 {Exchanging one rook would have reduced White's attacking chances.
Here Black has lesser dangers.} 35. Rxh5 Rxh5 36. Qxh5 Qg1+ 37. Kb2 Qd4+ 38.
Kb1 Be8 $15) 34. Qd3 Bg2 {Caruana want to play d5 but would like to keep his
bishop actively placed on e4. In some ways this is a highly ambitious move.} 35.
Rd4 d5 36. Qd2 Re4 $2 {Caruana was in terrible time pressure and missed
White's next move. As Karjakin described it, this sacrifice was not
particularly difficult to calculate.} (36... Be4 37. Rxb4 Qc7 {and position is
complicated but Black is not worse.}) 37. Rxd5 exd5 38. Qxd5 Qc7 (38... Rd4 39.
Qxd4 Qxd4 40. Rxd4 $16 {was the best defence, but this pawn down endgame looks
lost.}) 39. Qf5 $1 {Qh7 is an extremely difficult threat to meet.} (39. Qxh5 {
was also very strong.} Re6 40. Bxe6 Kxe6 41. Qe2+ Kf7 42. Qxg2 $18 {White
shouldn't have too many difficulties converting this.}) 39... Rf7 40. Bxf7 Qe5
(40... Kxf7 41. Rd7+ $18) 41. Rd7+ Kf8 42. Rd8+ {What a stunning finale. The
moment Caruana extended his hand, the playing hall erupted in a thunderous
applause for the new Challenger - Sergey Karjakin!} (42. Rd8+ Kxf7 43. Qh7+ Ke6
44. Qd7#) 1-0

Heartbroken. Spare a thought for Fabiano Caruana, who was so near to getting the match in his home country.

The nice thing to see was that Caruana could still maintain his smile at the press conference

"I pass the baton to you" – Vishy Anand congratulates Sergey Karjakin

Russians, Spanish, Indian, Dutch, German, you name it! Media from all over the world was present.

 Karjakin spoke about his mental approach to this tourament, what will be his first words
to his wife and son, and who his secret second was (spoiler: he is a strong Azerbaijani grandmaster).

World Cup 2015 and now the Candidates! Can anyone stop him?!!

Reactions of other grandmasters and colleagues on Karjakin's victory

Vladimir Potkin, Karjakin's second, speaks about his favourite game
and why playing in the Aeroflot Open was the right decision

It is always nice to get the views of the ACP President and strong grandmaster Emil Sutovsky

Daniil Dubov on why Karjakin has good chances in his match against Magnus Carlsen-
"He has lost to Magnus in the past but he doesn't fear him."

Olga Girya - "Sergey's move e5 was just wonderful!"

Other three games from round fourteen

It is obvious that Karjakin-Caruana was the most important game of the day. For the remaining three games we have notation, pictures, videos and summaries.

Peter Svidler – Viswanathan Anand 0.5-0.5

This was the second most important game of the day as its result could have had a big impact on Karjakin and Caruana's decisions in their game. Svidler, as usual, began with the English Opening. This time Anand opted for the more solid 6...Re8 rather than 6...e4. Svidler's manoeuvre with Ne1-c2-e3 looked a tad time consuming, and already after the opening Black had equalized. Anand had no real problems to hold the game and thus Vishy fiished third.

[Event "Moscow Candidates"] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.03.28"] [Round "14"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [PlyCount "69"] 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 Bb4 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O Re8 7. Ne1 d6 8. Nc2 Bc5 9. Rb1 a5 10. a3 Be6 11. d3 d5 12. cxd5 Nxd5 13. Ne3 Nce7 14. Ncxd5 Nxd5 15. Nc4 Bd6 16. d4 exd4 17. Nxd6 Qxd6 18. Qxd4 Qe7 19. e4 c5 20. Qd1 Nc7 21. Be3 b6 22. f4 Rad8 23. Qc2 Bd5 24. Rbe1 Bxe4 25. Bxc5 Bxc2 26. Bxe7 Rd7 27. Bh4 Rxe1 28. Rxe1 f6 29. g4 Nd5 30. Bg3 f5 31. gxf5 Nf6 32. Bf2 Rd6 33. Re6 Rd1+ 34. Re1 Rd6 35. Re6 1/2-1/2

Vishy Anand on his experience of playing in the Candidates 2016

"Grunfeld is still my main opening, but the Slav worked very well!"

Anish Giri – Veselin Topalov 0.5-0.5

A typical Catalan where White had a tiny pull but Black slowly and steadily equalized. This was perhaps the dullest game of the day. It was the 14th draw in a row for Anish, while Topalov finishes at minus 5.

[Event "Moscow Candidates"] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.03.28"] [Round "13"] [White "Giri, Anish"] [Black "Topalov, Veselin"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E06"] [PlyCount "58"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 Be7 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Nc3 dxc4 7. Ne5 c5 8. dxc5 Qxd1+ 9. Nxd1 Bxc5 10. Nc3 Nc6 11. Nxc4 Rd8 12. Be3 Bxe3 13. Nxe3 Rb8 14. f4 e5 15. f5 Nd4 16. g4 b6 17. Rc1 Bb7 18. Bxb7 Rxb7 19. Kf2 h6 20. h4 g5 21. fxg6 fxg6 22. Rhg1 Ne6 23. g5 hxg5 24. hxg5 Nh7 25. Ne4 Kg7 26. Rc6 Nd4 27. Rc3 Ne6 28. Rc6 Nd4 29. Rc3 Ne6 1/2-1/2

Anish explains the reason why he ended up with fourteen draws rather than fighting for the top spot

Topalov speaks about why he lacks motivaton and how he feels like Anatoly Karpov right now!

Hikaru Nakamura – Levon Aronian 0.5-0.5

Hikaru Nakamura went for the solid Qa4+ Variation in the Ragozin. The players followed a few of the old games until move 13, although it seemed as if the moves they were making were not prepared at home. Hikaru won a pawn but Levon had sufficient compensation. In the end al the pieces were exchanged and the players agreed to a draw.

[Event "Candidates Moscow"] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.03.28"] [Round "14"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Black "Aronian, Levon"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [PlyCount "65"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. Qa4+ Nc6 6. e3 O-O 7. Qc2 Re8 8. Bd2 a6 9. a3 Bd6 10. h3 h6 11. Rd1 dxc4 12. Bxc4 e5 13. O-O Bd7 14. dxe5 Nxe5 15. Nxe5 Rxe5 16. f4 Bf5 17. Qb3 Re7 18. Qxb7 Bc2 19. Rc1 Rb8 20. Qxa6 Rxb2 21. Nd1 Rb6 22. Qa5 Bb3 23. Nf2 Qb8 24. Bxb3 Rxb3 25. a4 Qb7 26. Qf5 Bb4 27. Bxb4 Qxb4 28. e4 Nxe4 29. Nxe4 Qxe4 30. Qxe4 Rxe4 31. Rxc7 Rxa4 32. Kh2 Rb2 33. Rf3 1/2-1/2

Hikaru Nakamura on what he learnt from this Candidates

Final standings

The above cross table is automatically generated on the ChessBase software using the 56 games and their results. However, due to different tiebreak criteria used in the tournament, these are the official standings:

1. Sergey Karjakin
2. Fabiano Caruana
3. Viswanathan Anand
4. Anish Giri
5. Hikaru Nakamura
6. Levon Aronian
7. Peter Svidler
8. Veselin Topalov

Photos by Amruta Mokal of ChessBase India

Pairings and results

Round 1, Friday 11 March 2016
Karjakin Sergey
½-½
Svidler Peter
Nakamura Hikaru
½-½
Caruana Fabiano
Giri Anish
½-½
Aronian Levon
Anand Viswanathan
1-0
Topalov Veselin
Round 2, Saturday 12 March 2016
Svidler Peter ½-½ Topalov Veselin
Aronian Levon ½-½ Anand Viswanathan
Caruana Fabiano ½-½ Giri Anish
Karjakin Sergey 1-0 Nakamura Hikaru
Round 3, Sunday 13 March 2016
Nakamura Hikaru
½-½
Svidler Peter
Giri Anish
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Anand Viswanathan
½-½
Caruana Fabiano
Topalov Veselin
0-1
Aronian Levon
Rest day, Monday 14 March 2016
Round 4, Tuesday 15 March 2016
Svidler Peter
½-½
Aronian Levon
Caruana Fabiano
½-½
Topalov Veselin
Karjakin Sergey
1-0
Anand Viswanathan
Nakamura Hikaru
½-½
Giri Anish
Round 5, Wed. 16 March 2016
Giri Anish ½-½ Svidler Peter
Anand Viswanathan ½-½ Nakamura Hikaru
Topalov Veselin ½-½ Karjakin Sergey
Aronian Levon ½-½ Caruana Fabiano
Round 6, Thursday 17 March 2016
Anand Viswanathan
1-0
Svidler Peter
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Giri Anish
Aronian Levon
1-0
Nakamura Hikaru
Caruana Fabiano
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Rest day, Friday 18 March 2016
Round 7, Saturday 19 March 2016
Svidler Peter
½-½
Caruana Fabiano
Karjakin Sergey
½-½
Aronian Levon
Nakamura Hikaru
1-0
Topalov Veselin
Giri Anish
½-½
Anand Viswanathan
 
Round 8, Sunday 20 March 2016
Svidler Peter
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Caruana Fabiano
1-0
Nakamura Hikaru
Aronian Levon
½-½
Giri Anish
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Anand Viswanathan
Round 9, Monday 21 March 2016
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Svidler Peter
Anand Viswanathan
1-0
Aronian Levon
Giri Anish
½-½
Caruana Fabiano
Nakamura Hikaru
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Rest day, Tuesday 22 March 2016
Round 10, Wed. 23 March 2016
Svidler Peter
½-½
Nakamura Hikaru
Karjakin Sergey
½-½
Giri Anish
Caruana Fabiano
1-0
Anand Viswanathan
Aronian Levon
½-½
Topalov Veselin
Round 11, Thursday 24 March 2016
Aronian Levon
0-1
Svidler Peter
Topalov Veselin
½-½
Caruana Fabiano
Anand Viswanathan
1-0
Karjakin Sergey
Giri Anish
½-½
Nakamura Hikaru
Round 12, Friday 25 March 2016
Svidler Peter
½-½
Giri Anish
Nakamura Hikaru
1-0
Anand Viswanathan
Karjakin Sergey
1-0
Topalov Veselin
Caruana Fabiano
½-½
Aronian Levon
Rest day, Saturday 26 March 2016
Round 13, Sunday 27 March 2016
Caruana Fabiano
½-½
Svidler Peter
Aronian Levon
½-½
Karjakin Sergey
Topalov Veselin
0-1
Nakamura Hikaru
Anand Viswanathan
½-½
Giri Anish
Round 14, Monday 28 March 2016
Svidler Peter ½-½ Anand Viswanathan
Giri Anish ½-½ Topalov Veselin
Nakamura Hikaru ½-½ Aronian Levon
Karjakin Sergey 1-0 Caruana Fabiano

Roundup broadcasts

ChessBase is doing roundup shows at the end of each round of the Candidates.

Here is the full schedule of future broadcasts – you need to be a premium member to watch

Roundup Commentary Schedule

Date Day Round English German
28.03.2016 Monday Round 14 Yannick Pelletier Klaus Bischoff

Chess Prodigies Uncovered:
Sergey Karjakin

By IM Lorin D'Costa

Languages: English
ISBN: 978-3-86681-379-3
Delivery: Download, Post
Level: Beginner, advanced, tournament player
Price: €27.90 or €23.45 without VAT (for Customers outside the EU) $25.33 (without VAT)

Sergey Karjakin hit the headlines in 2002 when he became the world’s youngest ever grandmaster aged just 12 years and 7 months, a record which shocked the chess world and still stands today.

In this new series with ChessBase, IM Lorin D’Costa investigates the famous prodigy focusing mainly on Sergey’s early career from aspiring nine-year-old up to grandmaster at twelve, culminating in his current world top ten status, and on who his rivals are for the title of world champion.

Not many chess players can say they defeated a grandmaster at age 11, but Sergey did when he defeated Pavel Eljanov in the Ukrainian Team Championships in 2001, and from a level endgame at that! How did Sergey defeat one of the world’s best players, Alexei Shirov, with masterful precision at the age of just 12? How did Sergey grind down the reigning world champion Vladimir Kramnik in 2004 in an opposite coloured bishop ending in the Dortmund playoff aged just 14? Enjoy these and many other scintillating games, along with the new ChessBase interactive format of Question & Answer, to enjoy an interesting documentary about one of the strongest players in modern day chess and his road from young prodigy to grandmaster and beyond!

Video running time: 5 hours.

Order "Chess Prodigies Uncovered: Sergey Karjakin" in the ChessBase Shop

Links



Sagar Shah is an International Master from India with two GM norms. He is also a chartered accountant and would like to become the first CA+GM of India. He loves to cover chess tournaments, as that helps him understand and improve at the game he loves so much. He is the co-founder of the ChessBase India website.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


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chessbibliophile chessbibliophile 5/12/2016 10:21
In an interview after the tournament Karjakin said, he was outplayed at one point in his game with Caruana
Fritz recommends first the pawn sacrifice, 27.e5 Qxe5 and then only 28. bxa4.
After each of the next moves played, 28.Qd3 and 29. Bd3 it has the same reply …Rfg8, giving Black a mild edge.
The queen’s move took off the pressure on the f-file and the Black rook would have been able to go to the g-file.

bondsergey bondsergey 4/1/2016 07:53
No, Svidler is 4th (by the highest number of points taken from Aronyan, Giri, and Nakamura)! see final ceremony!!! Aranyan - 5th (he has more wins than Giri), Giri-6th, Nakamura -7th (least number of points taken from Aronyan, Giri, and Svidler)! Now it makes sence.
Hawkman Hawkman 3/30/2016 02:02
I draw, therefore I am.
zxvdsa zxvdsa 3/29/2016 08:19
congragulation karjakin
fightingchess fightingchess 3/29/2016 07:36
congratulations to karjakin. he deserved this. he defended worse positions accurately and converted every winning position into a win. he has strong nerves and i predict a close match between him and carlsen although carlsen is a clear favorite.
Chvsanchez Chvsanchez 3/29/2016 05:31
The final standings are wrong: Svidler is 5th.
KchessK KchessK 3/29/2016 05:00
Not even close
http://en.chessbase.com/post/computer-simulates-and-predicts-candidates-winner
tharley tharley 3/29/2016 03:56
In this report on the highest stakes US vs Russia showdown since 1972, Karjakin gets a US flag and Caruana an Italian. Show some respect.
henki3 henki3 3/29/2016 02:29
Funny you notice
There are also many Ka - almost champions

Kasimdhanov
Kamsky
Kavolenko
Kachiev
Kaopian

I think the winner should have been

Kanamura or Kanand
or maybe next year
Karikrisna or Kakovenko
Offramp Offramp 3/29/2016 02:00
It's odd to think of the Ka- champions: Kapablanca, Karpov, Kasparov, Kamnik, Karlsen and now we'll have Karjakin.
It should have been Karuana.
VVI VVI 3/29/2016 01:55
A great performance by Anand who accounted for Sergey`s only loss in this tournament.
I expect Anand to be around for the next candidates in 2018. All the very best Vishy!
hasayin6 hasayin6 3/29/2016 12:04
Shah, many thanks for your great work and videos! Appreciated.
hasayin6 hasayin6 3/29/2016 12:04
Shah, many thanks for your great work and videos! Appreciated.
eltollo eltollo 3/29/2016 11:23
Who will sponsor the WC match? As neither player represents US, finding a sponsor for a match in NY might become complicated.
Klacsanzky Klacsanzky 3/29/2016 11:21
Those who are saying Anand plays bad chess and so on, he still came in third and played many brilliant wins. And.... he's a five time world champion.
Pionki Pionki 3/29/2016 10:20
The next generation has officially taken over.
Nostalgiac1972 Nostalgiac1972 3/29/2016 08:40
Very well said Ashishchess! Vishy is truly unexpendable. I would call him "The Phoenix of Chess". He always displays a sufficient combination of chess dynamism and stamina at high levels, defying his age. Love you Vishy!
Peter B Peter B 3/29/2016 08:35
bondsergey, tie breaks are (1) head-to-head, (2) number of wins. So the games involving the 4 players tied on 7 were used to tie break them. Obviously Giri scored 3/6, I'm not sure about the others.
bondsergey bondsergey 3/29/2016 08:27
24. Qf1 was the best Karyakin's move saving the game.
bondsergey bondsergey 3/29/2016 08:08
I guess it does not matter since who won the group in which all players scored 7 points since : "All prize money will be divided equally where players have the same score in the tournament (after 14 rounds). "
Still I would like an explanation to the final standings.
RaoulBertorello RaoulBertorello 3/29/2016 07:56
@ulysssesganesh: it's all about the past. Carlsen has a higher number of wins over Karjakin, won in the most different events. That's why I think Karjakin doesn't have the smallest chance against him. And after watching Caruana misunderstanding too many positions in the middle game or not playing properly endgames, and all of that not always because of time pressure - which, by the way, isn't an excuse because you, among the biggest professional chess players, shouldn't run out of time at any given possibility as instead he does -, then I think also Caruana would have easily lost to Carlsen next fall.
bondsergey bondsergey 3/29/2016 07:55
How come that Giri finished on top of the group in which everyone scored 7 points? which rule is that?
Queenslander Queenslander 3/29/2016 07:48
Congratulations to Sergey Karjakin! IMO, he is the best challenger for Carlsen because he is very solid, has excellent technique (especially when defending), and always seems to stay calm. Magnus is 70 Elo points stronger and my warm favourite to win but I don't think it will be easy. I predict Carlsen will beat Karjakin by amassing 6.5 points by Rd 9 or 10.
ashishchess ashishchess 3/29/2016 07:19
I have seen lot of negativity on Anand Carlson game in November 2016. Anyways Anand is not there now but such a great extent of dislike especially from specific part of world is shocking. Anand played well and we as Indian proud of him that he ruled chess world for more than a decade as world champion. Which is the player in history playing at top level chess from 1993 ? That time there were no computers , he ruled..... When computers came he was still at top........when youngsters came he was still there....... About 25 years he is there.....Kudos Anand. You are our real hero. My best wishes to Karjakin and Magnus and best wishes to Vishy for his future career path !
peter frost peter frost 3/29/2016 06:44
A big thank you to Sagar Shah for his explanatory and instructive game annotations, consistently achieving the right balance between words and variations. His words enlighten us, and he has the discipline to show only those variations that are necessary to clarify what is going on. He is among the best in the business. Many many thanks.
karavamudan karavamudan 3/29/2016 04:19
cONGRATS Sergey; He will have stamina to last 12 rounds with Carlsen and maybe even win a couple of games.
jajalamapratapri jajalamapratapri 3/29/2016 04:14
In the first video showing arrivals at 6:38 Anish and Sopiko are announced to come in and the moment we see them there is an abrupt cut. What happened? Did they moon the camera? Or did Anish say "weg met die kanker kamera man"? :)
vincero vincero 3/29/2016 03:46
anand showing why he has never been good for chess.....karjakin...finally showing that his chess accomplishments that made him a prodigy..were accurate...and caruana showing..he will be the man to beat for the next 10 years...while naka....like a golfer..comes on strong only after he losses enough to have all the pressure taken off him....svidler...always solid/...but always short...topa......a streaky player.....but..these young guys dont care about that..he wont challenge ever again...giri....missing the ability to play for the win...he rather not lose then win....aronian....no matter how he plays never makes you believe in him....all and all.....the best contender DID EMERGE.
mozartiano123 mozartiano123 3/29/2016 03:39
A lot of guys just disqualifying Sergey. Here is what I think.

Sergey was not favourit in the world cup. He won it.
He was not among the 3 that media thought would win the candidates. He is now the challenger.


There is a great chance that he beats Carlsen and I sum it up in 3 points:

1- His is at his peak now and greatly motivated. His results are finally comming (remember that he has the same age as M.C.) and he is happy in his marriage and with his son.

2- Russian top guys like each other and will be ready to support Sergey with his experience. When Kramnik beat Kasparov, he said that his team was the biggest part of that achievement.

3- He is a fantastic defender. Carlsen wins many games because their opponents crack after the 5th hour of play. Sergey has shown that he can handle it, even being a piece down (Aronian) or a Queen down (Caruana in the first leg).

Hence, I think he is a worh challenger and I would put the odds like this: 55% M.C. 45% S.K.
ulyssesganesh ulyssesganesh 3/29/2016 03:21
dear raulbertorello, be ready for a karjakin win in the WCC in november!n beware of the ides of november!
thlai80 thlai80 3/29/2016 03:02
Based on the performance of none really shine in the candidates, Magnus could well play a simul match against both Karjakin and Caruana and still win.
Blackacre Blackacre 3/29/2016 02:57
Congratulations to Karjakin. He showed a resilience that Aronian did not. After losing to Anand, Karjakin was animated in the press conference and came back the next day to win a crucial game against Topalov. In contrast, Aronian looked dejected and devastated after his losses against Anand and Svidler and won no more games. At that level, psychological strength is as important as chess ability. I think that Karjakin will give Carlsen a good fight, although I'd still bet on Carlsen to win.
johnmk johnmk 3/29/2016 02:32
Hey at least give Caruana credit for being gracious in his defeat -- unlike some other Americans.
KOTLD KOTLD 3/29/2016 02:26
I liked Karjakin's modesty about Rxd5 being "easy".
I actually thought it was a great combination, and very fitting for such an important encounter.
david gonzalez david gonzalez 3/29/2016 01:55
Agon is right,the organizers put the money,they make the event happen so they should have exclusive transmission rights.Chessbase and other sites should pay for transmission privileges.If that is not to their liking they can come up with money and organize their exclusive tournaments.
sicilian_D sicilian_D 3/29/2016 01:54
Congratulations Sergey Karjakin. Good luck in November :)
Anand: needed to just hold 2 of the losses didnt you? :)
Giri has 14 in a row... draws... lets see how long a streak he maintains.

and for all who didnt draw or win against Caruana, that is how its done. learn :D
cheers
APonti APonti 3/29/2016 01:10
An endgame that "looks lost" is better than being mated at the center of the board, isn´t it ?
Congrats to Karjakin !
Remember: Carlsen will play every endgame unless he´s *_really_ lost*.
firestorm firestorm 3/29/2016 12:36
The prize fund was $420K, chessbase has details on the breakdown, so has the worldchess website :)
Masquer Masquer 3/29/2016 12:25
Was there a money prize for winning the Candidates? If so, what was it?
Thanks!
moneywise moneywise 3/29/2016 12:12
Karjakin is the deserving challenger and a heartfelt congratulations to him!

However, I can't help but lament how a Caruana victory would have been huge for chess in the U.S. A player from Brooklyn playing in a WC match in NYC? This could have been the catalyst for a chess boom in the U.S. reminiscent of the Fischer era.

Alas, it is not to be :(

I'm sure this is not lost on AGON and FIDE as well. Surely, sponsorship opportunities and general media interest will be impacted greatly.