Russian Team Championship: Siberia-Sirius and Yugra win

5/11/2017 – The Russian Team Championship ended predictably in a clean sweep for Siberia-Sirius, winning all its matches with its unparalleled lineup (Kramnik, Giri, Mamedyarov, etc). The Women’s event was a far tighter affair, won by Yugra (Ushenina) over ShSM Legacy Square Capital (Kosteniuk), coming down to their individual match. Here is a large illustrated report by Alex Yermolinsky.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

Russian Team Championship: Siberia-Sirius and Yugra win

Report and analysis by Alex Yermolinksy / photos by Eugeny Atarov (click images for high-res)

More than the teams, this was very much the story of the players, and there were many great tales. What can one say that was not said in the previous report? The race for the trophies in the Open section was really about who would come in second. Gold was already spoken for, from day one. Why this excessive ‘confidence’ in the outcome? Take a look for yourself at the top two teams:

Siberia-Sirius (avg. rating 2765)

Bo.   Name Rtg FED
1 GM Kramnik Vladimir 2811 RUS
2 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2772 AZE
3 GM Giri Anish 2785 NED
4 GM Nepomniachtchi Ian 2751 RUS
5 GM Grischuk Alexander 2750 RUS
6 GM Andreikin Dmitry 2723 RUS
7 GM Korobov Anton 2688 UKR
8 GM Khismatullin Denis 2651 RUS

You just know things are going to be tough when board six is Dmitry Andreikin (2723)

Mednyy vsadnik (avg. rating 2702)

Bo.   Name Rtg FED
1 GM Svidler Peter 2755 RUS
2 GM Vitiugov Nikita 2731 RUS
3 GM Matlakov Maxim 2714 RUS
4 GM Rodshtein Maxim 2698 ISR
5 GM Fedoseev Vladimir 2690 RUS
6 GM Khairullin Ildar 2624 RUS
7 GM Goganov Aleksey 2592 RUS

After this, the next highest average was 2665, and no other team had more than one 2700 player, if any. Siberia-Sirius not only has six of the top eight rated players in the entire competition, three of whom are in the world’s Top 10, but even their ‘alternates’ Korobov and Khismatullin are regular tournament winners. For example, Korobov just played in the Karpov-Poikovsky where he finished third… with a 2800 performance. Speaking of whom, the Ukrainian scored a fantastic 5.5/6 with a 2884 performance. Not bad for an alternate...

Still, while the top seed team did live up to its expectations, albeit with some matches won by the bare minimum, what really stood out were the individual performances and games.

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov had no reason to make faces with his immaculate 4.0/4 result that has now taken him to a lofty 2795 rating in the Live Ratings list. He will play in Moscow at the FIDE Grand Prix. Can he keep up this momentum?

The biggest name was Vladimir Kramnik, who slightly underperformed (meaning compared to his 2800+ rating) and lost two Elo

Speaking of superlative performances, if you don't know the name already, then it is time to become familiar with Vladimir Fedoseev, a young player on the rise.

Vladimir Fedoseev is not a household name yet. Moreover, you might confuse him with someone else. Mega Base 2017 lists his games under two different entries, both listed as a 2152 FM born in 1938! My own version, which I diligently try to keep clean of errors, has Fedoseev, Vl3 (?) with no title or birth year given, but at least the games are of the right guy.

Kovalenko vs Fedoseev (annotated by Alex Yermolinsky)

[Event "XXIV RUS-chT Premier 2017"] [Site "Sochi"] [Date "2017.05.05"] [Round "4"] [White "Kovalenko, Igor"] [Black "Fedoseev, Vladimir"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A10"] [WhiteElo "2659"] [BlackElo "2684"] [Annotator "AlexYermo"] [PlyCount "92"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. c4 f5 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. Nc3 d6 5. Rb1 {A bit extravagant, but not entirely out of style for Igor Kovalenko, an original player as he is.} e5 6. b4 $5 ({It wasn't too late to transpose into a standard Closed English:} 6. d3 Nf6 7. Nf3 O-O 8. O-O Nc6 {One example is Eljanov-Radjabov, 2010, which went} 9. b4 h6 10. b5 Ne7 11. a4 Be6 12. a5 Rc8 13. Nd2 b6 14. Bb2 g5 $13) 6... e4 $5 {Suddenly the game takes its own distinct shape.} 7. Bb2 Nc6 8. Nh3 {Kovalenko decided to take it easy.} ({A plan with attacking the center would find its supporters:} 8. d3 {[#]} exd3 ({Perhaps Black should seek counterplay in} 8... Ne5 9. dxe4 Nxc4 10. Ba1 c6 11. Qb3 Be6 12. exf5 gxf5) ({or even} 8... Nf6 9. dxe4 O-O) 9. exd3 Nxb4 {It only looks like a free pawn. After} 10. Nh3 Nf6 ( 10... Ne7 {is more cautious, yet, passive. White will go on with} 11. O-O O-O 12. Qd2 Nbc6 13. Nd5) 11. Ba1 a5 12. a3 Nc6 13. Qe2+ {is extremely annoying} Kf7 (13... Qe7 14. Nd5 $18) 14. Ng5+ Kf8 15. O-O Nd4 16. Qa2 {with strong initiative. As they say, there's no such thing as free lunch.}) 8... Nf6 ({ There was a small trap:} 8... Nxb4 $2 9. Qb3 Nc6 10. Nxe4 $1 $16) 9. Nf4 g5 10. Nfd5 Nxd5 11. Nxd5 Ne5 {Fedoseev demonstrates a classical approach. Getting a bishop pair cannot be a bad plan.} ({There's something to be said in favor of} 11... Bxb2 12. Rxb2 Ne5 {With White's main piece, Bg2, out of action his Q-side feels overextended.} 13. Rc2 c6 14. Nc3 O-O 15. O-O ({No time to get fancy:} 15. h4 Be6 16. d3 exd3 17. exd3 f4 $1) 15... Be6 (15... Nxc4 16. Nxe4 Na3 17. Rb2 Nc4 18. Rc2 $11) 16. d4 Nxc4 17. d5 Bf7 18. g4 {what a mess this position is.}) 12. Bxe5 Bxe5 13. d4 Bg7 14. e3 {The situation has stablized.} O-O 15. h4 c6 16. Nc3 g4 17. Qd2 Be6 18. Bf1 a6 $1 {A great little move. Fedoseev shows flexibility with his plans of action on the Q-side.} 19. a4 $6 ( {More accurate was} 19. Be2 Bf7 (19... b5 20. d5 $1) {and only now} 20. a4 c5 21. bxc5 dxc5 22. d5 {as Bf7 is out of position to support b7-b5.}) 19... c5 $5 {I admire the fighting spirit.} ({Of course, not} 19... a5 20. b5 Qf6 21. Rc1 Bf7 22. d5 c5 {and a draw is inevitable. Had this happened I wouldn't have been commenting on this game.}) 20. bxc5 (20. d5 cxb4 21. Rxb4 Bd7 $15) 20... dxc5 21. d5 Bd7 22. Be2 (22. Rxb7 {is a bad idea:} Rb8 23. Rxb8 Qxb8) 22... Qf6 23. Rc1 Qd6 24. Rb1 {Unnecessary precaution.} ({I doubt Fedoseev intended to give his DSB, so} 24. Kf1 {would help White to stop the following maneuver by the black rook} Rf6 (24... Bxc3 25. Rxc3 Bxa4 26. Ra3 Bd7 27. Qa2 {White isn't risking much.}) 25. Kg2 Qe5 26. Rb1 {Now White is perfectly safe, and he may even entertain some hopes for} b6 27. Rb3 Rb8 28. Rhb1 a5 29. d6 $5 Rxd6 30. Nd5) 24... Qe5 25. Rc1 Rf6 $1 26. O-O ({Too late for} 26. Rb1 Rd6 27. Rb3 { The white king still isn't tucked in, so} b5 $1) 26... Rb6 $1 {A big step forward for Black.} 27. Rc2 Rb3 28. Rfc1 Rd8 $5 {Prophylaxis!} ({In case of} 28... b6 {Kovalenko could have found himself sufficiently desparate to try} 29. d6 $5) 29. a5 $1 {Timely reaction from Kovalenko.} ({In the face of Black's local success White could have hardly stayed put with} 29. Kg2 b6 30. Bd1) 29... Qc7 30. Ra2 Qe5 31. Na4 Qe7 32. Qd1 Rb4 33. Rb1 Be8 34. Nb6 h5 35. Qc1 Bc3 $6 {It's understandable Black didn't want to trade off his pride and glory, the active rook. However, the text move leaves him vulnerable to a nasty tactic with d5-d6.} 36. Bd1 Bg6 (36... Rxb1 37. Qxb1 $11) 37. Rb3 ({Here White had a chance:} 37. Bb3 $1 Be5 38. d6 $1 Rxd6 39. Nd5 {winning the exchange. The outcome of the game would have been different, but I find it hard to blame Fedoseev for taking risks.}) 37... Rxb3 38. Bxb3 Qf6 39. Na4 Bb4 40. Qd1 Rd6 41. Nb2 $2 ({Once again, losing the a-pawn was not a big deal as long as Black has to trade his DSB.} 41. Kg2 Qd8 42. Nb6 Bxa5 43. Rxa5 Qxb6 44. Ra1 { Moreover, if Black gets reckless he will pay the steep price:} Qb4 $6 45. Qc2 b5 $2 46. cxb5 axb5 47. Ra8+ Kf7 48. Qb2 $18) 41... Qd8 42. Qa1 Bc3 {After the time control Kovalenko found himself under considerable pressure.} 43. Bc2 $2 ( {Yet, there's no obvious way through his defenses after} 43. Kg2) 43... f4 $3 { [#] We were wondering why Fedoseev kept his LSB on g6.} 44. Qb1 (44. exf4 e3 45. Bxg6 e2 $19) (44. gxf4 Qxh4 $19) 44... fxg3 45. fxg3 Rf6 46. Bxe4 Qd6 { An abrupt end of a difficult game.} 0-1

The real Vladimir Fedoseev was born in February 1995, which makes him 22 years of age. He comes from my hometown of Saint Petersburg. Vladimir got his GM title in 2011, but until recently his progress, while steady, had not been spectacular. Just compare Fedoseev to Anish Giri. They both grew up in St. Petersburg, Giri is one year older. They must have played each other a number of times back then, but their career accomplishments and respective standings in the World's ranks are quite different.

Vladimir Fedoseev, looking a bit like Orson Welles in Moby Dick, has been wreaking havoc on his opponents much like the famous white whale

No need to despair, though. Different people have different development curves, and the story continues to be written as we speak. Trust me on that, I obtained my GM title at the ripe age of 34. (Ed: and peaked at world no. 19 at age 40)

Fedoseev seems to be turning things around in 2017. First came an important victory at the Aeroflot Open, which qualifies him for the Dortmund tournament this summer.

Hasangatin vs Fedoseev (annotated by Alex Yermolinsky)

[Event "XXIV RUS-chT Premier 2017"] [Site "Sochi"] [Date "2017.05.07"] [Round "5"] [White "Hasangatin, Ramil"] [Black "Fedoseev, Vladimir"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A80"] [WhiteElo "2509"] [BlackElo "2690"] [Annotator "AlexYermo"] [PlyCount "88"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. d4 f5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bg5 d5 4. Bxf6 exf6 5. e3 c6 6. Bd3 Qb6 $5 {I have quite a bit of experience on the White side of this variation, and I have always found this reply the most annoying.} ({White does well after the standard procedure} 6... Be6 7. Qf3 g6 8. Nge2 Nd7 9. h3 {there he continues with g2-g4.}) 7. Na4 (7. Rb1 {is OK, but then White cannot castle long.}) 7... Qa5+ 8. c3 g6 9. Ne2 Be6 10. Qc2 Nd7 11. b4 Qc7 12. Rb1 Bd6 13. c4 ({The problem with the logical} 13. Nc5 {is that after} Bf7 {White has to trade his well-positioned knight} 14. Nxd7 (14. c4 Nb6 $1 15. cxd5 Nxd5 16. a3 a5 17. b5 O-O {In his rush to get things going on the Q-side White neglected the need to secure his his king. Now, as the c-file is about to open up he will come to regret it.})) 13... dxc4 14. Bxc4 Bxc4 15. Qxc4 Nb6 16. Qe6+ Qe7 17. Qxe7+ Kxe7 18. Nc5 Nd5 {[#] Hasangatin did well by getting rid of the queens, but he he makes a strange decision to take his king out of the game.} 19. O-O $6 ({ Perhaps he was concerned with} 19. Kd2 a5 ({The position after} 19... Bxc5 20. bxc5 b5 {appears to be about equal.}) 20. bxa5 b6 $1 {Neat-looking idea, but White should be able to handle it:} 21. axb6 Rxa2+ 22. Kd3 Rb8 23. Nc3 $1 Ra3 24. Rhc1 Rxb6 {liquidating.}) 19... b6 20. Na6 {A rather extreme measure taken to slow down Black's play at the cost of keeping that knight out of play.} (20. Nd3 a5 21. b5 Rhc8 $15) 20... Kd7 21. Rfc1 Rhe8 22. g3 g5 23. Rb2 h5 $1 24. Kg2 h4 25. gxh4 $2 ({There was no other choice but} 25. Nc3 hxg3 26. Nxd5 cxd5 27. hxg3 Rac8 28. Rxc8 Rxc8 29. b5 {and hang tough.}) 25... f4 $1 {Very energetic play by Fedoseev. When you're hot you're hot.} 26. b5 $6 {This looks like a blunder, but I suspect Hasangatin did it on purpose, to distract Black from his demolition job in the center.} Ba3 {Fredoseev shrugs his shoulders, takes the sacrificial offering, and calmly proceeds to win the game.} 27. bxc6+ Kd6 28. Rbc2 Bxc1 29. Rxc1 Rac8 30. c7 fxe3 31. hxg5 fxg5 32. fxe3 Rxe3 33. Ng3 Ra3 34. Ne4+ Ke7 35. Nb8 Rxc7 36. Nc6+ Ke6 37. Nxg5+ Kf5 38. h4 Rxa2+ 39. Kh1 Rf2 40. Nh3 Rf3 41. Kg2 Re3 42. Rf1+ Kg4 43. Ne5+ Rxe5 44. Nf2+ Kh5 0-1

Vladimir then made first visit to the United States where he finished equal second behind David Howell in the St. Louis Winter Classic (a total misnomer it is, the tournament wasn't really held in winter and the participants, while quite strong, aren't old enough to fall into the Classic category).

April found Vladimir in Germany, where he competed in the strong Grenke Open, a sideshow to the main event won in style by Levon Aronian. Fedoseev finished with a respectable 7/9, half a point behind four players. In the last two events he could have been placed higher if it wasn't for late round losses.

There were no setbacks on Fedoseev's path in Sochi. His final tally is 6.0/7 (with a 2867 performance), the most individual points scored in the event.

Fedoseev vs Palachev (annotated by Alex Yermolinsky)

[Event "XXIV RUS-chT Premier 2017"] [Site "Sochi"] [Date "2017.05.10"] [Round "7"] [White "Fedoseev, Vladimir"] [Black "Palachev, Petr"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D38"] [WhiteElo "2684"] [BlackElo "2392"] [Annotator "AlexYermo"] [PlyCount "69"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 d5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 O-O 7. a4 $6 { I'm not familiar with this move, and I'm afraid, it is not very good. The idea of putting the bishop on a3 works well in the Evans Gambit, but here Black has already castled.} (7. e3 {is standard issue.}) 7... b6 8. Ne5 $6 (8. cxd5 exd5 9. Bg5) 8... Nfd7 9. Qd3 $6 {Fedoseev seems to be determined to wipe his opponent clean off the board. I guess, having 5/6 does wonders for one's confidence.} Nxe5 10. dxe5 Nc6 ({On} 10... Ba6 {White has} 11. e4 Bxc4 12. Qg3 {but the same idea} f5 13. exf6 Qxf6 {defends successfully.}) 11. Qg3 f6 $1 { Indicating that White will not be given a free ride on the K-side.} 12. exf6 Qxf6 13. Bg5 Qf5 14. h4 Ba6 (14... d4 $5 {would probably do a quicker job.}) 15. h5 Bxc4 16. Rh4 Qf7 ({More convincing was} 16... Rf7 17. e4 Qe5 {Why not force the queens off when the opportunity is there?}) 17. e4 Bxf1 {Black begins to slip up a bit. He didn't have to help the white king escape.} (17... e5 18. Bxc4 dxc4 19. Rd1 Rae8 20. Rg4 Re6 {would keep White from making any threats, and Black's Q-side pawn majority wouldn't have to wait long for its turn.}) 18. Kxf1 dxe4 $2 {Opening the position is wrong in principle, plus the white rook is glad to accept the invitation to join the game.} 19. h6 g6 20. Rxe4 e5 21. Rae1 {White has full compensation, so Fedoseev's liberties in the opening will go unpunished. This time.} Rae8 22. Kg1 Qd7 23. Qe3 Re6 24. Qe2 Rd6 $2 (24... Rf5 $11) 25. f4 $1 exf4 $2 26. Be7 $1 {Just like that White is winning the exchange and the game with it.} Rd2 27. Qc4+ Rf7 28. Ba3 Rd1 29. Qe2 Rxe1+ 30. Qxe1 Rf8 31. Bxf8 Kxf8 32. Rxf4+ Kg8 33. Qf1 Qd6 34. Qc4+ Kh8 35. Qxc6 1-0

Vladimir's rating is over 2700 now, and he needs to build up on the momentum. There's not a whole lot of room at the top, so hurry up!

Among his immediate rivals is Vladislav Artemiev, who played board one for Ladya, and turned in a very good 2773 performance over the seven rounds.

Anish Giri was not alone, and came with his wife Sopiko Guramishvili and their infant son

Gata Kamsky was also there in good company, and was with his girlfriend WGM Vera Nebolsina

A typical scene at the venue

Final Open standings

Rk Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 TB1 TB2 TB3
1 Siberia-Sirius (Novosibirsk oblast) * 4 3.5 3.5 5.5 5 4.5 5 14 31 7
2 ShSM Legacy Square Capital (g. Moscow) 2 * 3 3.5 4.5 3.5 4 4 11 24.5 5
3 Malakhit (g. Ekaterinburg) 2.5 3 * 3 3 3 4 5 8 23.5 2
4 Mednyy vsadnik (g. St-Peterburg) 2.5 2.5 3 * 3 3.5 4 4 8 22.5 3
5 Shakhmatnaya federatsiya TsFO 0.5 1.5 3 3 * 2 4 3 5 17 1
6 SDYuSShOR ShSh (g. St-Peterburg) 1 2.5 3 2.5 4 * 2 3 4 18 1
7 Ladya (Republic Tatarstan) 1.5 2 2 2 2 4 * 3.5 4 17 2
8 Zhiguli (Samarskaya oblast) 1 2 1 2 3 3 2.5 * 2 14.5 0

Tie Break1: Matchpoints (2 for wins, 1 for Draws, 0 for Losses)
Tie Break2: points (game-points)

Siberia-Sirius with their first place medals, trophy and certificates

The Women’s event was very tight, and while top-seed Yugra did take the top honors, it should be noted that they held only a two Elo edge over the second-seed ShSM Legacy Square Capital. In fact, it all was decided in the second round when the muscovite team (ShSM) fell to Yugra for their only defeat in the competition.

The winners Yugra: (from left) Marina Nechaeva, Anna Ushenina, Baira Kovanova, Olga Girya, and Natalija Pogonina

Final Women's standings

Rk Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 TB1 TB2
1 Yugra (KhMAO-Yugra) * 3 2.5 3 4 3 4 3 3.5 16 26
2 ShSM Legacy Square Capital (g. Moscow) 1 * 3.5 2.5 2.5 3.5 3 3.5 4 14 23.5
3 SDYuSShOR ShSh (g. St-Peterburg) 1.5 0.5 * 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3 2.5 12 20.5
4 Donchanka (Rostovskaya oblast) 1 1.5 1.5 * 3 2 2.5 3.5 4 9 19
5 Ladya (Republic Tatarstan) 0 1.5 0.5 1 * 2.5 2.5 3 3.5 8 14.5
6 Universitet (g. Belorechensk) 1 0.5 0.5 2 1.5 * 2 2.5 3.5 6 13.5
7 Yuzhnyy Ural (Chelyabinskaya oblast) 0 1 0.5 1.5 1.5 2 * 2 2 3 10.5
8 Bukavushki (g. Tolyatti) 1 0.5 1 0.5 1 1.5 2 * 2.5 3 10
9 Zhiguli (Samarskaya oblast) 0.5 0 1.5 0 0.5 0.5 2 1.5 * 1 6.5

Tie Break1: Matchpoints (2 for wins, 1 for Draws, 0 for Losses)
Tie Break2: points (game-points)

Team Malakhit, with GM Sveshnikov on board one (left) took first in the senior section, played out as a double round-robin

The Girls competition was won by Anatoly Karpov Chess School

The Boys event was won by "Prof Chess Klab"

Links

You can use ChessBase 14 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs to replay the games in PGN. You can also download our free Playchess client, which will in addition give you immediate access to the chess server Playchess.com.


Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register

horius horius 5/12/2017 07:58
Report and analysis by Alex Yermolinksy / photos by Eugeny Atarov
HackingTeaching HackingTeaching 5/12/2017 04:54
Who wrote this article? It is very interesting and well written!
1