Russian Superfinal 02: Gunina and Vitiugov lead

10/6/2013 – Gunina and Vitiugov take an early lead in their respective tournaments as they are the only players to have won both of their games. Kramnik-Svidler was not too exciting as Svidler perfectly neutralized Kramnik's ideas in a Gruenfeld endgame. However, Nepo absolutely demolished Andreikin and we give you the annotations of that game provided by GM Josh Friedel.

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Russian Championship Super Finals

The tournament is hosted by the Russian Chess Federation in cooperation with the Charity Foundation of Elena and Gennady Timchenko , with the support of the Government of the Nizhny Novgorod region. The Super Final will be a continuation of the program "chess in the museums", started by the match for the world title in 2012 at the Retyakov Gallery in Moscow on the initiative of businessmen Andrei Filatov and Gennady Timchenko. The venue for the prestigious tournament in Nizhny Novgorod will be the State Historical and Architectural Museum Manor Rukavishnikov. The Nizhny Novgorod State Art Museum will also take part in the organization of the tournament. The tournament is a ound robin with ten players over nine rounds. Sofia-Rules. If first place is shared than the champion will be decided through a tiebreaker match. Time Control: 90 minutes/40 moves + 30 minutes + 30 seconds/move starting with the 1st move.

Round 2: Men's

Round 02 –October 06 2013, 15:00h
Shomoev, Anton 2579
½-½
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
Vitiugov, Nikita 2706
1-0
Motylev, Alexander 2676
Karjakin, Sergey 2762
½-½
Goganov, Aleksey 2575
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
1-0
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
½-½
Svidler, Peter 2740

Nepo took time out of his busy schedule after the round to sign autographs to young fans

Nepomniachtchi, Ian 1-0 Andreikin, Dmitri

Our friend grandmaster Joshua Friedel from America brings us very detailed commentary on how exactly Nepomniachtchi was able to dismantle Andreikin, who just recently made it to the final of the World Cup:

[Event "Russian Superfinal 2013"] [Site "Novgorod, Russia"] [Date "2013.10.06"] [Round "2"] [White "Nepomniachti, I."] [Black "Andreikin, D."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B12"] [WhiteElo "2702"] [BlackElo "2706"] [Annotator "Friedel,Joshua"] [PlyCount "71"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [TimeControl "5400+30"] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 {This line is more active than the more common 3... Bf5, as it immediately puts pressure on white's center. It often leads to French-like structures, which suits a player like Andreikin who has the French as his main weapon.} 4. dxc5 (4. c3 {Attempting to treat this position like an advance French is not so threatening, since black has the option of developing his light-squared bishop.} Nc6 5. Nf3 Bg4 {and black has a comfortable game.}) 4... Nc6 (4... e6 {is the other main line, and now} 5. a3 Nc6 6. Nf3 {would transpose to the game.}) 5. a3 {This move is quite rare and a bit sneaky. 5. Nf3 and Bb5 are the most common moves.} e6 {This is a safest option, and the game transposes into well known territory.} (5... Nxe5 {is the most principled move, which leads to unclear play.} 6. b4 g6 7. Bb5+ Bd7 8. Qe2 Bg7 9. Bb2 Bxb5 10. Qxb5+ Qd7 11. Qxd7+ Kxd7 {1/2-1/2 (60) Najer,E (2637)-Landa,K (2639) Germany 2012}) 6. Nf3 Bxc5 7. b4 Bb6 8. Bb2 {This is the main idea of playing an early a3. White grabs some space on the queenside and defends the potentially weak pawn on e5.} Nge7 9. Bd3 Ng6 10. O-O O-O 11. Re1 {This type of position is extremely common in these lines, even if this exact position has only been reached in a handful of games. Black has to put pressure on White's center quickly, or else he'll simply get overrun.} a5 {Black decides to force White's hand on the queenside.} 12. b5 Nce7 {This is technically a novelty, though I find it is by far the most logical place for the knight.} ( 12... Nb8 {was played previously, but this loosens black's grip on the center, which should allow white to get an easy advantage with the typical break c4.} 13. c4 Nd7 14. Nbd2 (14. cxd5 exd5 15. Bxg6 hxg6 16. Nc3 {and white is nearly winning.}) 14... Nc5 15. Bf1 Bd7 16. g3 Qc7 17. Bg2 Rfd8 18. Qe2 Be8 19. Nd4 Rac8 20. h4 Nd7 {1/2-1/2 (20) Fercec,N (2492) -Bodiroga,P (2405) Sens 2008}) 13. a4 {Up until now, play has been fairly normal. This is where I believe Black starts to go astray.} Bc5 $6 {I don't like this idea at all.} (13... f6 { is the standard break in this kind of position. It looks a bit loose, but I still think Black should give it a try, as slower plans simply give White time to improve his position.} 14. exf6 gxf6 15. c4 Nf4 (15... e5 {looks nice, but after} 16. cxd5 Nxd5 17. Bc4 Be6 18. Nc3 {Black has some issues, for example if } Ngf4 19. Nxd5 Bxd5 (19... Nxd5 20. Qb3 Rc8 21. Rad1 $18) 20. Nxe5 $1 fxe5 21. Qg4+ Ng6 22. Red1 $18) 16. Bf1 e5 {and Black is at least getting some play.}) 14. Nbd2 Qb6 15. Rf1 {Black has forced White's rook to f1, but the queen and bishop look ridiculous now.} Qc7 16. Nb3 b6 17. Re1 {Now that the pressure is off, the rook simply moves back and it is clear Black's position has only worsened.} Bb4 $2 {Black tries to force a concession out of White, but this really just loses time.} (17... Bb7 {I prefer this simple developing move, although Black's position is far from pleasant.}) 18. c3 Bc5 {White's bishop is blocked, but the pawn on e5 is difficult to attack anyway and the d4 square will make a nice home for White's knight.} 19. Rc1 (19. h4 {already looked quite strong, but there is no huge rush.}) 19... Bb7 20. Nbd4 {The computer doesn't like this approach, but White simply wants to prevent any ideas of f6. If Black can't get this freeing move in, an eventual kingside assault will be the end.} Rae8 21. Rc2 {White wants to get his dark-squared bishop in the game by means of Bc1.} Nf4 22. Bf1 Nf5 {Black's knights look active, but this is just an illusion, and they get chased back in short order.} 23. Bc1 Ng6 24. Bd3 {Black's flurry of activity is over, and now it is White's turn.} Bc8 25. g3 { White prepares the final assault. Black is helpless..} h6 (25... f6 26. exf6 gxf6 27. Bxf5 exf5 28. Bh6 {does not help Black's cause.}) (25... Bd7 {trying to play f6 was perhaps Black's only try, but it looks grim.}) 26. h4 {Now black has absolutely no defense.} Qd8 27. h5 Nge7 28. Nb3 $1 {Nepomniatchi is precise to the last. He won't allow black to trade any pieces, and now g4 will simply win the knight.} Nxg3 {Black is desperate, and there was nothing better. } 29. Nxc5 Nxh5 30. Nh2 bxc5 31. Qxh5 {Black has no compensation for the piece and is still getting attacked. It is only a question of when Andreikin wants to end the suffering.} c4 32. Bf1 Nf5 33. Ba3 d4 34. Bg2 d3 35. Rd2 Ne7 36. Qg4 {It isn't often you see a player as strong as Andreikin lose without a fight. Black played too slowly and once White improved his position enough it was basically over. An impressive win!} 1-0

Vitiugov, Nikita 1-0 Motylev, Alexander
Motylev had an acceptable position from the opening: despite playing against the pair of bishops and having an isolated pawn, it seemed that his pieces were very active and that it would be difficult for White to prove something in the position, no to mention Vitiugov's bishops were somewhat exposed and Black could trade them off. The players reached an endgame position that did not seem to be very dangerous for Black, but he strangely traded of knights on f3, leaving the pawn that recaptured in that square very vulnerable. Despite Black's active rook it was clear that this pawn was not going to last very long. Still Black had good chances to hold the endgame, but this did not happen because of the mistake 58...Rb3?; instead of this trying to swap pawns with 58...Rb2+! and Rf2 would have saved the game. After Black's second and last mistake the win was trivial for Vitiugov.

Vitiugov was aided by his opponent's mistakes today, and takes an early lead with 2.0/2

Kramnik, Vladimir ½-½ Svidler, Peter
Kramnik famously beat Svidler's Gruenfeld in the Candidate's tournament in an interesting endgame, and he chose to go for another typical Gruenfeld position without queens, but Svidler was well prepared. Black quickly grabbed a pawn on d4 which left his position vulnerable and without development, but he was able to give back a pawn to force the opposite colored bishops and it was clear from that point on that neither side was going to win. Kramnik kept pushing forward since he had a minimal edge but Svidler held without problems.

Kramnik was unable to break Svidler's Gruenfeld this time

Shomoev, Anton ½-½ Inarkiev, Ernesto
It would be interesting to know what Inarkiev had prepared against the blow 13.Bxe6. The move wins a pawn due to simple tactics but maybe Black's activity would compensate for this and he would be able to regain it eventually. In any case Shomoev chose the more sedate 13.Rad1 but was soon able to sacrifice on f7 for a winning attack. His 21.Bxf7+? gave Inarkiev some chances, both 21.Rd1 and 21.Qg4+ would've won a decisive amount of material and kept the attack going. The way Shomoev played he still held a winning advantage: he had an extra pawn and Black's king was exposed, but he played passively for no apparent reason and let Inarkiev hang on to a half point.It is not easy to win in this tournament, specially for a player that is not yet 2600, and if Shomoev forgives positions like the one he forgave today he will not score any full points.

Karjakin, Sergey ½-½ Goganov, Aleksey
Despite Karjakin's almost 200 point lead in Elo over his rival and the fact that he was playing white, it is hard to say that Goganov at any point stood worse. He even sacrificed an exchange that Karjakin decided to decline, and soon it was the higher rated player that forced the perpetual when things weren't looking so good.

Goganov's showed that even a 200 point rating gap is nothing to fear

Joshua Friedel

Josh was born in 1986 in New Hampshire, USA and is currently living in Wisconsin. He obtained his international master title in 2005 and his grandmaster in 2008. He has participated in five US Championships, including a tie for fourth in 2008. Major Open tournament victories include: the 2003 Eastern Open, 2005 Berkeley Masters, 2008 National Open, 2009 Edmonton International, 2009 North American Open, 2010 Saint Louis Open, 2010 American Open, 2013 Chicago Open.

Josh is the current US Open Champion and is the first person qualified for the 2014 US Chess Championship.

Round2: Women's

Round 02 –October 06 2013, 15:00h
Kosintseva,T 2515
½-½
Kovalevskaya,E 2410
Kosteniuk,A 2506
1-0
Pogonina,N 2485
Goryachkina, A 2436
½-½
Kovanova, B 2396
Kashlinskaya, A 2435
0-1
Gunina,V 2506
Charochkina,D 2343
½-½
Bodnaruk, A 2459

Goryachkina, Aleksandra ½-½ Kovanova, Baira
Goryachking obtained strong and typical Catalan pressure as the endgame certainly favored her. However she was a little slow in bringing her rooks into play and it allowed her opponent just enough time to counterattack and secure a draw.

Kosintseva, Tatiana ½-½ Kovalevskaya, Ekaterina
Kosintseva was able to obtain an extra pawn, though it was crippled and doubled, and it gave her a small edge. She had to play a little risky to try to make use of it, by trading her opponent's d5 pawn for her own h3 and trying to use her passed pawn as a deflection for Black's pieces. Instead she played it safe and it seems that it gave enough time for Kovalevskaya to solidify. Eventually Kovalevskaya blundered in a queen endgame, but Kosintseva blundered back and a draw was agreed.

The highest rated player, Kosintseva, starts with no wins

Kashlinskaya, Alina 0-1 Gunina, Valentina
Kashlinskaya showed an excellent opening idea. Her 20.Qf4! is a powerful novelty that certainly put Gunina against the ropes early in the opening. However, it is obvious that a player must be good beyond opening knowledge. White stalled for too long instead of transferring her rook on the third rank and going for Black's king as soon as possible. She traded off into an endgame where White had a rook and a pawn for two minor pieces, and granted there is no way White was worse. In a complicated position she could have traded queens and gone into an unclear endgame, or she could play a silly check and mate herself, unfortunately she chose the latter and Gunina won the game.

Not the cleanest game in history but Gunina moves to 2.0/2

Kosteniuk, Alexandra 1-0 Pogonina, Natalia
Kosteniuk played a terrific game today. She got a small advantage from the opening due to her pair of bishops, and with a perfect amount of patience she slowly outplayed her opponent. First she obtained strong play against Black's kingside, she won a pawn and she simplified into a won position. A very clean game by the ex-World Champion.

Charochkina, Daria ½-½ Bodnaruk, Anastasia
Black declined an early repetition and went for the win in this complicated game. She was entitled to as her piece sacrifice granted her a strong initiative that not only regained her the piece, but also left her with a better position. However she was too hasty in dismantling her opponent's structure. 31...Rxc4? allowed her opponent a well calculated perpetual check while the more patient 31...Rce8! would have left White in a really bad position.

Replay Men's Round 2 games

Replay Women's round 2 games

Schedule

Men

Round 01 – October 05 2013, 15:00h
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
1-0
Shomoev, Anton 2579
Svidler, Peter 2740
1-0
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
1-0
Karjakin, Sergey 2762
Goganov, Aleksey 2575
0-1
Vitiugov, Nikita 2729
Motylev, Alexander 2676
0-1
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
Round 02 –October 06 2013, 15:00h
Shomoev, Anton 2579
½-½
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
Vitiugov, Nikita 2706
1-0
Motylev, Alexander 2676
Karjakin, Sergey 2762
½-½
Goganov, Aleksey 2575
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
1-0
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
½-½
Svidler, Peter 2740
Round 03 – October 07 2013, 15:00h
Svidler, Peter 2740   Shomoev, Anton 2579
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706   Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
Goganov, Aleksey 2575   Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
Motylev, Alexander 2676   Karjakin, Sergey 2762
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695   Vitiugov, Nikita 2729
Round 04 – October 08 2013, 15:00h
Shomoev, Anton 2579   Vitiugov, Nikita 2729
Karjakin, Sergey 2762   Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702   Motylev, Alexander 2676
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796   Goganov, Aleksey 2575
Svidler, Peter 2740   Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
Round 05 – October 09 2013, 15:00h
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706   Shomoev, Anton 2579
Goganov, Aleksey 2575   Svidler, Peter 2740
Motylev, Alexander 2676   Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695   Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
Vitiugov, Nikita 2727   Karjakin, Sergey 2762
Round 06 – October 11 2013, 15:00h
Shomoev, Anton 2579   Karjakin, Sergey 2762
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702   Vitiugov, Nikita 2729
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796   Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
Svidler, Peter 2740   Motylev, Alexander 2676
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706   Goganov, Aleksey 2575
Round 07 – October 12 2013, 15:00h
Goganov, Aleksey 2575   Shomoev, Anton 2579
Motylev, Alexander 2676   Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695   Svidler, Peter 2740
Vitiugov, Nikita 2729   Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
Karjakin, Sergey 2762   Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
Round 08 – October 13 2013, 15:00h
Shomoev, Anton 2579   Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796   Karjakin, Sergey 2762
Svidler, Peter 2740   Vitiugov, Nikita 2729
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706   Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
Goganov, Aleksey 2575   Motylev, Alexander 2676
Round 09 – October 14 2013, 13:00h
Motylev, Alexander 2676   Shomoev, Anton 2579
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695   Goganov, Aleksey 2575
Vitiugov, Nikita 2729   Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
Karjakin, Sergey 2762   Svidler, Peter 2740
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702   Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
 

Women

Round 01 – October 05 2013, 15:00h
Charochkina,D 2343
½-½
Kosintseva,T 2515
Bodnaruk, A 2459
0-1
Kashlinskaya,A 2435
Gunina,V 2506
1-0
Goryachkina,A 2436
Kovanova,B 2396
1-0
Kosteniuk,A 2495
Pogonina,N 2485
½-½
Kovalevskaya,E 2410
Round 02 –October 06 2013, 15:00h
Kosintseva,T 2515
½-½
Kovalevskaya,E 2410
Kosteniuk,A 2506
1-0
Pogonina,N 2485
Goryachkina, A 2436
½-½
Kovanova, B 2396
Kashlinskaya, A 2435
0-1
Gunina,V 2506
Charochkina,D 2343
½-½
Bodnaruk, A 2459
Round 03 – October 07 2013, 15:00h
Bodnaruk, A 2459   Kosintseva,T 2515
Gunina,V 2506   Charochkina,D 2343
Kovanova, B 2396   Kashlinskaya, A 2435
Pogonina,N 2485   Goryachkina, A 2436
Kovalevskaya,E 2410   Kosteniuk,A 2495
Round 04 – October 08 2013, 15:00h
Kosintseva,T 2515   Kosteniuk,A 2495
Goryachkina, A 2436   Kovalevskaya,E 2410
Kashlinskaya, A 2435   Pogonina,N 2485
Charochkina,D 2343   Kovanova, B 2396
Bodnaruk, A 2459   Gunina,V 2506
Round 05 – October 09 2013, 15:00h
Gunina,V 2506   Kosintseva,T 2515
Kovanova, B 2396   Bodnaruk, A 2459
Pogonina,N 2485   Charochkina,D 2343
Kovalevskaya,E 2410   Kashlinskaya, A 2435
Kosteniuk,A 2727   Goryachkina, A 2436
Round 06 – October 11 2013, 15:00h
Kosintseva,T 2515   Goryachkina, A 2436
Kashlinskaya, A 2435   Kosteniuk,A 2495
Charochkina,D 2343   Kovalevskaya,E 2410
Bodnaruk, A 2459   Pogonina,N 2485
Gunina,V 2506   Kovanova, B 2396
Round 07 – October 12 2013, 15:00h
Kovanova, B 2396   Kosintseva,T 2515
Pogonina,N 2485   Gunina,V 2506
Kovalevskaya,E 2410   Bodnaruk, A 2459
Kosteniuk,A 2495   Charochkina,D 2343
Goryachkina, A 2436   Kashlinskaya, A 2435
Round 08 – October 13 2013, 15:00h
Kosintseva,T 2515   Kashlinskaya, A 2435
Charochkina,D 2343   Goryachkina, A 2436
Bodnaruk, A 2459   Kosteniuk,A 2495
Gunina,V 2506   Kovalevskaya,E 2410
Kovanova, B 2396   Pogonina,N 2485
Round 09 – October 14 2013, 13:00h
Pogonina,N 2485   Kosintseva,T 2515
Kovalevskaya,E 2410   Kovanova, B 2396
Kosteniuk,A 2495   Gunina,V 2506
Goryachkina, A 2436   Bodnaruk, A 2459
Kashlinskaya, A 2435   Charochkina,D 2343

Links

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