Russian Super Final 03: Andreikin Topples Kramnik

10/7/2013 – Andreikin took vengeance for his World Cup match against Kramnik and won a nice game. Now Svidler and Vitiugov share first place with 2.5/3. In the girl's section Kovanova and Gunina also have 2.5/3. Gunina barely survived against today's birthday girl, Daria Charochkina. The organization of the tournament gave her a nice surprise on this occasion. Round 3 report.

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Russian Championship Super Finals

The tournament is hosted by the Russian Chess Federation in cooperation with the Charity Foundation of Elena and Gennady Timchenko , with the support of the Government of the Nizhny Novgorod region. The Super Final will be a continuation of the program "chess in the museums", started by the match for the world title in 2012 at the Retyakov Gallery in Moscow on the initiative of businessmen Andrei Filatov and Gennady Timchenko. The venue for the prestigious tournament in Nizhny Novgorod will be the State Historical and Architectural Museum Manor Rukavishnikov. The Nizhny Novgorod State Art Museum will also take part in the organization of the tournament. The tournament is a ound robin with ten players over nine rounds. Sofia-Rules. If first place is shared than the champion will be decided through a tiebreaker match. Time Control: 90 minutes/40 moves + 30 minutes + 30 seconds/move starting with the 1st move.

Round 3: Men's

Round 03 – October 07 2013, 15:00h
Svidler, Peter 2740
1-0
Shomoev, Anton 2579
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
1-0
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
Goganov, Aleksey 2575
½-½
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
Motylev, Alexander 2676
½-½
Karjakin, Sergey 2762
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
½-½
Vitiugov, Nikita 2729

Kramnik beat Andreikin in the Final of the World Cup, but Andreikin too sweet revenge today

Andreikin, Dmitri 1-0 Kramnik, Vladimir

GM Josh Friedel brings commentary on the game of the day:

[Event "Russian Superfinal 2013"] [Site "Novgorod, Russia"] [Date "2013.10.07"] [Round "3"] [White "Andreikin, D."] [Black "Kramnik, V."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C67"] [WhiteElo "2740"] [BlackElo "2795"] [Annotator "Friedel,Joshua"] [PlyCount "167"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [TimeControl "5400+30"] {For some reason, I always feel like Kramnik losing violates some basic law of nature. Nevertheless, I'll do my best to explain how such a thing took place.} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 {Kramnik stuns the world by playing the Berlin.} 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. dxe5 {This sideline is generally considered quite tame.} (6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 {is the infamous endgame which Kramnik made popular by using it to hold Kasparov at bay.}) 6... Nxb5 7. a4 Nbd4 {This is the safest choice for Black.} (7... d6 8. e6 fxe6 9. axb5 {is for folk who are less sound in the head.}) 8. Nxd4 Nxd4 9. Qxd4 d5 10. exd6 Qxd6 {I'm sure at this point most people were expecting the players to repeat moves and take a nap.} 11. Qe3+ $5 {This strange looking move isn't a novelty, but it is hard to believe it is a serious try for advantage.} (11. Qe4+ Qe6 12. Qd4 Qd6 {is the forced draw which has occurred in countless games.}) 11... Be6 (11... Be7 12. Nc3 c6 {is another option for black.}) (11... Qe6 {is idiotic now due to} 12. Qg3 {and Black is under some pressure.}) 12. Nc3 a6 {It is worth investing a tempo to take away the b5 square from White's knight.} 13. Rd1 Qc6 14. Rd3 {This bizarre looking move has actually been tried before.} Rc8 $6 {This move is too deep for me, but I fear that it is also too deep for the position. The idea is to defend the weak c-pawn while not committing the bishop yet, but I think it is just too slow.} (14... Be7 {I'm curious what Andreikin's prep was here.} 15. Nb5 O-O 16. Nd4 Qd5 17. Nxe6 Qxe6 18. Qxe6 fxe6 19. Be3 {Maybe his plan was to play into this ending, though in my opinion White's advantage is pretty much symbolic.} Bf6 20. c3 Rfd8 21. Rad1 Rxd3 22. Rxd3 Rd8 23. Rxd8+ Bxd8 24. g4 e5 25. Kg2 Kf7 26. Kf3 Ke6 27. Ke4 c6 28. f3 b5 29. b3 g6 30. c4 Be7 31. Bd2 Bd8 32. Bc3 Bc7 33. Bd2 Bd8 34. Bc3 Bc7 35. Bd2 { 1/2-1/2 (35) Jones,G (2635)-Fressinet,L (2693) Plovdiv 2012}) (14... Bc5 15. Qg3 f6 {is another interesting possibility for black.}) 15. Ne2 $1 {Andreikin uses the opportunity to improve his knight.} Bc5 (15... Qxc2 16. Nd4 {would be ill-advised.}) 16. Qg3 f6 17. Be3 {Andreikin's play is very straightforward. Once he forces the bishop trade, Black's dark squares will be hurting.} Bd6 18. Bf4 Bxf4 19. Nxf4 O-O {This drops the c7 pawn, but Black had no better options. } 20. Rc3 Qd6 21. Nxe6 Qxe6 22. Rxc7 Rxc7 23. Qxc7 Rc8 24. Qxb7 Rxc2 {The dust has settled, and while White is up a pawn, Black has clear compensation due to his active pieces. All the same, it is clear White got what he wanted from the opening, not something most can claim when playing Kramnik.} 25. h3 Qe2 26. Qb8+ Kf7 27. Qa7+ Kg8 28. b4 h6 29. Qb8+ Kh7 30. Qf4 {Play has been quite logical so far. Black is trying to keep White as passive as possible while keeping the pawns at bay. The problem is that it is impossible to do this indefinitely.} Qe6 31. Qd4 Qe2 32. Qf4 Qe6 33. Rb1 Qa2 {This move makes Black go down a bit quicker, but it is an understandable try, as otherwise Black will simply be forced into passivity once the pawn gets rolling.} 34. Qf5+ Kg8 35. Rd1 {Now that Black's queen is out of the center, White focuses his attention on the weak king.} Qxa4 (35... Rd2 36. Rxd2 Qxd2 37. Qb1 {is hopeless.}) 36. Rd8+ (36. b5 $1 {was the simplest way to end it, the point being that if} axb5 37. Rd8+ Kf7 38. Qh5+ {leads to mate.}) 36... Kf7 37. Qd5+ Kg6 38. Qd3+ (38. Qd1 $1 {is crushing now, as Black is left without a good move. This kind of move is difficult to spot over the board, however.} Qc6 39. Qg4+ Kf7 40. Rd7+ Ke8 41. Rxg7 $18) 38... Kf7 39. Rd7+ Ke8 40. Rd8+ Kf7 41. Rd7+ Ke8 42. Rxg7 {White missed a couple knockout blows, but he correctly assessses the rook ending as a win. Don't believe your computers here, folks.} Qa1+ 43. Kh2 Qe5+ 44. Qg3 Qxg3+ (44... Rxf2 45. Qxe5+ fxe5 46. Rg6 Rb2 47. Rxa6 Rxb4 48. Rxh6 {is an easy win.}) 45. Kxg3 Rb2 46. Rb7 (46. Rh7 {is also good.}) 46... Kf8 (46... a5 {is a more active try, but it isn't quite good enough.} 47. Rb6 $1 {And White will collect Black's entire kingside, as bxa5 is a threat now.} (47. b5 a4 48. b6 a3 {will liquidate the queenside pawns leading to a theoretically drawn ending.}) 47... axb4 (47... Rxb4 48. Rxf6 h5 49. f4 a4 50. Rf5 Rb2 51. Rxh5 $18) 48. Rxf6 h5 49. Rh6 Kd7 50. Rxh5 Kc6 51. Rh8 Rd2 52. Rb8 $18) 47. Rh7 Rb3+ 48. f3 Rxb4 49. Rxh6 {In general, White's kingside majority should be enough to win these endings. The idea is to advance the kingside pawns while making sure White's rook can get behind the a-pawn. Andreikin's technique is instructive.} Kg7 50. Rh5 Ra4 51. h4 Kg6 52. Rc5 a5 53. h5+ Kg7 ( 53... Kh6 54. Kh3 Ra1 55. Kg4 {is an easy win.}) 54. f4 Ra2 55. Kf3 a4 56. Ra5 a3 57. g4 Kh6 58. Ra6 Kg7 59. Ra7+ Kg8 (59... Kh6 60. Rf7 $18) 60. Ke4 Rg2 61. Kf5 a2 62. h6 Kh8 63. g5 fxg5 64. fxg5 Rb2 65. Kg6 Rb6+ 66. Kh5 Rb5 (66... Rb2 {doesn't improve Black's chances.} 67. Ra8+ Kh7 68. g6#) 67. Rxa2 {Now we've reached a basic endgame every Russian schoolboy knows. The plan is to put the rook on the e-file, get the king out, and eventually play g6.} Kh7 68. Ra7+ Kg8 69. Rg7+ Kh8 70. Rf7 Kg8 71. Rf6 Kh7 72. Re6 Ra5 73. Re7+ Kg8 74. Kg6 Ra6+ 75. Kf5 Ra1 76. g6 {Black has a lot of checks here, but inevitably his rook will get forced back to the 8th, and then White will force a rook trade.} Rf1+ 77. Ke5 Re1+ 78. Kd6 Rd1+ 79. Kc5 Rc1+ 80. Kb4 Rc8 81. Kb5 Ra8 82. Kb6 Rb8+ 83. Ka7 Rd8 84. Rb7 {with Rb8 coming next, Kramnik resigned. Andreikin recovered from yesterday's bad loss and avenged the World Cup final all in one go!} 1-0

 

With great style: Andreikin beats Kramnik for the second time this year, the first being at Dortmund

Svidler, Peter 1-0 Shomoev, Anton
Black's position looked threatening straight out of the opening. Clever play allowed Shomoev to consistently gain tempi against White's queen which allowed his superior development to develop into concrete threats. Precision failed him when instead of playing the strong 22...Nb6! he played 22...Nf6?! the difference being that the latter allowed Svidler to develop his a1-rook, whereas the former would have tied him to the defense of the a4 pawn. With the pressure off of Svidler, his superior minor piece gave him an edge. Black sealed his own fate with the incomprehensible decision to retain his knight and not trade it for White's bishop. With an extra pawn that Svidler picked off on a5 and a bishop against the knight the win was trivial.

To the untrained eye this game was very exciting...

Motylev, Alexander ½-½ Karjakin, Sergey
A wild game! Or at least it would have been if the players didn't repeat the game Vallejo Pons - Dominguez from Cuernavaca 2006 to the very end...

Goganov, Aleksey ½-½ Nepomniachtchi, Ian
Goganov was able to win a pawn in the opening, and he kept pressing forward the entire game. However the opposite colored bishops created a very difficult obstacle to overcome. Goganov tried as hard as he could, torturing Nepomniachtchi for over 100 moves, but alas Black was able to sacrifice a second pawn to secure a blockade and a draw.

After surviving a dubious position Inarkiev came back and almost won the game

Inarkiev, Ernesto ½-½ Vitiugov, Nikita
Never one to shy away from complications, Vitiugov played into wild complications and pushed his pawn on the h-file forward early in the opening to cause weaknesses on White's camp. In a very complicated position it seems that Vitiugov missed a chance to gain a decisive advantage by playing 21...Bg4!, though it is a very difficult move to make. Also a couple of moves later 23...Qc7! with the idea of Qb7! would have caused White problems in his light squares. In the game Vitiugov sacrificed his h3 pawn to obtain a powerful bishop on b7, but it was not enough to break through and slowly White consolidated his pawn, but Inarkiev was unable to convert a winning endgame against Vitiugov.

Joshua Friedel

Josh was born in 1986 in New Hampshire, USA and is currently living in Wisconsin. He obtained his international master title in 2005 and his grandmaster in 2008. He has participated in five US Championships, including a tie for fourth in 2008. Major Open tournament victories include: the 2003 Eastern Open, 2005 Berkeley Masters, 2008 National Open, 2009 Edmonton International, 2009 North American Open, 2010 Saint Louis Open, 2010 American Open, 2013 Chicago Open.

Josh is the current US Open Champion and is the first person qualified for the 2014 US Chess Championship.

Round 3: Women's

Round 03 – October 07 2013, 15:00h
Bodnaruk, A 2459
1-0
Kosintseva,T 2515
Gunina,V 2506
½-½
Charochkina,D 2343
Kovanova, B 2396
1-0
Kashlinskaya, A 2435
Pogonina,N 2485
½-½
Goryachkina, A 2436
Kovalevskaya,E 2410
½-½
Kosteniuk,A 2495

The rating favorite is now at only 1.0/3

Bodnaruk, Anastasia 1-0 Kosintseva, Tatiana
An important upset! White employed a Spanish Opening without h3, which is an interesting idea to fight against the mountain of theory that has developed around the Marshall. Soon the game turned wild as Kosintseva sacrificed two pawns for a powerful initiative and White's king found himself on d3 very soon after that, but somehow White was not losing by any means. After simplifying into an endgame White unnecessarily sacrificed an exchange, but her passed pawn on d6 allowed her to at least retain the balance. Kosintseva played too passively and her position collapsed after she allowed White's pieces to swarm to the 7th rank and paralyze her rooks.

Pogonina, Natalia ½-½ Goryachkina, Aleksandra
White was unable to get any advantage from this Slav defense and although both sides tried their own tricks at the end the game was simply even all throughout.

Surprise! Today is Chorachkina's 23rd birthday and the organizers gave her a nice surprise

She almost gave herself an awesome birthday present by defeating Gunina, but she failed in the conversion stage

Gunina, Valentina ½-½ Charochkina, Daria
Charochkina crushed Gunina from the opening and the middle game. She won a piece, correctly sacrificed it back to eliminate all of White's counterplay and for two extra pawns, but when it came time to finish her opponent off she kept missing chances until she blundered her initiative, her two extra pawns and any hope of winning the game away.

Kovalevskaya, Ekaterina ½-½ Kosteniuk, Alexandra
Kosteniuk managed to spoil her pawn structure in a Rauzer Sicilian style despite the game starting as a Rossolimo. This also meant that with the added development advantage from the Rossolimo (the check on b5 allows White a faster development than the regular Open Sicilian) Black's position was basically lost from the opening. The very simple 25.cxb5 would've finished Black as she would've had no defense at all against a subsequent Qa5 and a rooklift. Kovalevskaya played Qa5 too soon, but this was also winning. The baffling part was when White gave a perpetual in a winning position in which Black had no counterplay...

Not her birthday, but Kosteniuk got a nice half point gift from Kovalevskaya anyways

Kovanova, Baira 1-0 Kashlinskaya, Alina
Kovanova exhibited a better positional understanding than Kashlinskaya, her powerful knights and central domination outweighed her opponent's pair of bishops. This allowed her to slowly gain pawn after pawn until Black was forced to resign, a pretty example of this variation in the Spanish.

This girl showed today how to play the Spanish

Standings

Replay Men's Round 3 games

Replay Women's round 3 games

Schedule

Men

Round 01 – October 05 2013, 15:00h
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
1-0
Shomoev, Anton 2579
Svidler, Peter 2740
1-0
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
1-0
Karjakin, Sergey 2762
Goganov, Aleksey 2575
0-1
Vitiugov, Nikita 2729
Motylev, Alexander 2676
0-1
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
Round 02 –October 06 2013, 15:00h
Shomoev, Anton 2579
½-½
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
Vitiugov, Nikita 2706
1-0
Motylev, Alexander 2676
Karjakin, Sergey 2762
½-½
Goganov, Aleksey 2575
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
1-0
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
½-½
Svidler, Peter 2740
Round 03 – October 07 2013, 15:00h
Svidler, Peter 2740
1-0
Shomoev, Anton 2579
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
1-0
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
Goganov, Aleksey 2575
½-½
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
Motylev, Alexander 2676
½-½
Karjakin, Sergey 2762
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
½-½
Vitiugov, Nikita 2729
Round 04 – October 08 2013, 15:00h
Shomoev, Anton 2579   Vitiugov, Nikita 2729
Karjakin, Sergey 2762   Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702   Motylev, Alexander 2676
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796   Goganov, Aleksey 2575
Svidler, Peter 2740   Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
Round 05 – October 09 2013, 15:00h
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706   Shomoev, Anton 2579
Goganov, Aleksey 2575   Svidler, Peter 2740
Motylev, Alexander 2676   Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695   Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
Vitiugov, Nikita 2727   Karjakin, Sergey 2762
Round 06 – October 11 2013, 15:00h
Shomoev, Anton 2579   Karjakin, Sergey 2762
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702   Vitiugov, Nikita 2729
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796   Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
Svidler, Peter 2740   Motylev, Alexander 2676
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706   Goganov, Aleksey 2575
Round 07 – October 12 2013, 15:00h
Goganov, Aleksey 2575   Shomoev, Anton 2579
Motylev, Alexander 2676   Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695   Svidler, Peter 2740
Vitiugov, Nikita 2729   Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
Karjakin, Sergey 2762   Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
Round 08 – October 13 2013, 15:00h
Shomoev, Anton 2579   Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702
Kramnik, Vladimir 2796   Karjakin, Sergey 2762
Svidler, Peter 2740   Vitiugov, Nikita 2729
Andreikin, Dmitri 2706   Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695
Goganov, Aleksey 2575   Motylev, Alexander 2676
Round 09 – October 14 2013, 13:00h
Motylev, Alexander 2676   Shomoev, Anton 2579
Inarkiev, Ernesto 2695   Goganov, Aleksey 2575
Vitiugov, Nikita 2729   Andreikin, Dmitri 2706
Karjakin, Sergey 2762   Svidler, Peter 2740
Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2702   Kramnik, Vladimir 2796
 

Women

Round 01 – October 05 2013, 15:00h
Charochkina,D 2343
½-½
Kosintseva,T 2515
Bodnaruk, A 2459
0-1
Kashlinskaya,A 2435
Gunina,V 2506
1-0
Goryachkina,A 2436
Kovanova,B 2396
1-0
Kosteniuk,A 2495
Pogonina,N 2485
½-½
Kovalevskaya,E 2410
Round 02 –October 06 2013, 15:00h
Kosintseva,T 2515
½-½
Kovalevskaya,E 2410
Kosteniuk,A 2506
1-0
Pogonina,N 2485
Goryachkina, A 2436
½-½
Kovanova, B 2396
Kashlinskaya, A 2435
0-1
Gunina,V 2506
Charochkina,D 2343
½-½
Bodnaruk, A 2459
Round 03 – October 07 2013, 15:00h
Bodnaruk, A 2459
1-0
Kosintseva,T 2515
Gunina,V 2506
½-½
Charochkina,D 2343
Kovanova, B 2396
1-0
Kashlinskaya, A 2435
Pogonina,N 2485
½-½
Goryachkina, A 2436
Kovalevskaya,E 2410
½-½
Kosteniuk,A 2495
Round 04 – October 08 2013, 15:00h
Kosintseva,T 2515   Kosteniuk,A 2495
Goryachkina, A 2436   Kovalevskaya,E 2410
Kashlinskaya, A 2435   Pogonina,N 2485
Charochkina,D 2343   Kovanova, B 2396
Bodnaruk, A 2459   Gunina,V 2506
Round 05 – October 09 2013, 15:00h
Gunina,V 2506   Kosintseva,T 2515
Kovanova, B 2396   Bodnaruk, A 2459
Pogonina,N 2485   Charochkina,D 2343
Kovalevskaya,E 2410   Kashlinskaya, A 2435
Kosteniuk,A 2727   Goryachkina, A 2436
Round 06 – October 11 2013, 15:00h
Kosintseva,T 2515   Goryachkina, A 2436
Kashlinskaya, A 2435   Kosteniuk,A 2495
Charochkina,D 2343   Kovalevskaya,E 2410
Bodnaruk, A 2459   Pogonina,N 2485
Gunina,V 2506   Kovanova, B 2396
Round 07 – October 12 2013, 15:00h
Kovanova, B 2396   Kosintseva,T 2515
Pogonina,N 2485   Gunina,V 2506
Kovalevskaya,E 2410   Bodnaruk, A 2459
Kosteniuk,A 2495   Charochkina,D 2343
Goryachkina, A 2436   Kashlinskaya, A 2435
Round 08 – October 13 2013, 15:00h
Kosintseva,T 2515   Kashlinskaya, A 2435
Charochkina,D 2343   Goryachkina, A 2436
Bodnaruk, A 2459   Kosteniuk,A 2495
Gunina,V 2506   Kovalevskaya,E 2410
Kovanova, B 2396   Pogonina,N 2485
Round 09 – October 14 2013, 13:00h
Pogonina,N 2485   Kosintseva,T 2515
Kovalevskaya,E 2410   Kovanova, B 2396
Kosteniuk,A 2495   Gunina,V 2506
Goryachkina, A 2436   Bodnaruk, A 2459
Kashlinskaya, A 2435   Charochkina,D 2343

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