Qatar Masters Rd9: Magnus supreme in Qatar

by Sagar Shah
1/1/2016 – As you know from our Express report Magnus Carlsen won the Qatar Masters in a thrilling tiebreak finish with last year's winner Yu Yangyi. After the event was over our reporters in Doha had to take a flight home and got stuck in Bahrain. Thus the description of the final day comes a little late, but it is full of didactic analysis that will make you stronger, and exclusive pictures and videos.

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Qatar Masters 2015 – Magnus reigns supreme in Qatar

Report from Doha by Sagar Shah and Amruta Mokal

And the rook swooped to e4, with a double attack on the bishop on f4 and the knight on a4. Yu Yangyi sat there with his hands on his head. He was losing an entire piece and there was absolutely nothing he could do about it. He held out his hand in resignation and Magnus Carlsen became the champion of the Qatar Masters Open 2015. It was quite a one-sided blitz (5 min+ 3 sec) tiebreak where the World Champion beat the Chinese player with a score of 2-0. But let’s rewind a bit to the start of the final round of the event.

The last round at the Qatar Masters Open 2015 began at 12 p.m., three hours earlier than all the other days of the tournament. When a total of US $130,000 and norms are at stake it is natural for the players to be a little anxious before the start of the final round.

The three hour early start was a little difficult for Nguyen Ngoc Truongson, although
in the game he had absolutely no trouble in holding Pentala Harikrishna to a draw

Eesha Karavade, who played an excellent tournament, needed a draw in the last round to make her
second GM norm. She also had chances to win the best woman player prize if she won the game.
However in the end she lost and all her hopes were dashed.

B. Adhiban, who was the ACP Wild Card entry in the event, didn’t have a particularly
good tournament. But that didn’t stop him from giving his all in the last round

Zhang Zhong was concentration personified in his battle against Sergey Karjakin.

Karjakin won a marathon battle and finished fourth with a +4 score

Sanan Sjugirov was quite clearly going to miss the Qatar Masters because of some flight issues. The organizers sent him a ticket and the 22-year-old arrived in Doha at the eleventh hour. Sanan made full use of this opportunity as he beat Radoslaw Wojtaszek, Dmitry Jakovenko, and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov in the last round. He scored 6.5/9 and stood fifth in the final standings.

When two theoretical experts play the Botvinnik Variation in the Slav what you get is a real slugfest. Sethuraman (right) was much better prepared and crushed the super solid world number 18 Evgeny Tomashevsky.

Wei Yi’s (right) dismal tournament continued as he lost to his compatriot Lu Shanglei.
The Chinese prodigy, who had an excellent 2015, lost 24 Elo points in this event.

Magnus Carlsen, who was on 6.5/8, was leading by a half point margin over Kramnik and Yu Yangyi. This is what the key pairings of the final round looked like:

Bd No. Ti. Name Rtg Pts Res. Pts Ti. Name Rtg No.
1 1 GM Carlsen Magnus 2834   6 GM Kramnik Vladimir 2796 2
2 11 GM Yu Yangyi 2736 6   GM So Wesley 2775 4

If Magnus beat Vladimir then it was all over: he would win the title as no one would be able to catch him. But in case the top board clash ended in a draw and Yu Yangyi was able to beat Wesley So, then both Carlsen and Yu Yangyi would be on 7.0/9. The rules of the tournament said that “in the event of a tie for the first place in the tournament, there shall be conducted a Play-Off for the first prize of $27,000 and Trophy.” The players would play a blitz (5 minutes + 3 seconds) tiebreak of two games, and in case that ended in a draw, there would be another tiebreak of two games. A 1-1 tie again would mean the person to win the next decisive game would be the champion. In any case the blitz tiebreaks would only happen if Yu Yangyi scored the full point.

Magnus Carlsen and Vladimir Kramnik get ready for the last round encounter.
Notice how both the players had their drinks on their left side.

Tournament director Mohamed-Al-Modiahki asks Kramnik to keep his bottle
on the other side so that the photographers would have an uninterrupted view

Magnus was surely more interested in other games than his own after his sedate opening choice

Magnus opened with 1.e4 and Kramnik replied with his customary 3…Nf6 in the Ruy Lopez. Once Magnus played the move 5.Re1 instead of 5.d4 in the Berlin, it became quite obvious that the game with the symmetrical pawn structure would end in a draw. With just the e-file open both players exchanged their pieces and soon there was nothing really to play for. It was a result that suited both the players just fine. Magnus was happy with a draw as he now moved to 7.0/9, and Yu Yangyi could catch him only if he beat Wesley So – a task which was extremely difficult. And Kramnik was satisfied with his +4 performance to secure a joint second place in the tournament.

We stopped son Magnus and father Henrik in their tracks for a picture, as the duo were heading back to Torch Hotel, where the World Champion would take some rest and get prepared – in case he had to play the tiebreak.

Wesley So executes the favourite move of Nimzo Indian players - 3…Bb4. The onus
was now on Yu Yangyi to win the game and challenge Magnus Carlsen to a blitz playoff

After quickly finishing his game against Vladimir Kramnik, Magnus Carlsen went over to the board of Yu Yangyi vs Wesley So, which would decide whether the World Champion would have to sit at the chess board once again or not.

In the Qatar Masters 2014 Yu Yangyi made a final sprint to beat Anish Giri and Vladimir Kramnik in the last two rounds to clinch the event. The defending champion had absolutely no intentions of easily giving up his title to Magnus Carlsen. There is definitely something about decisive and crucial games that brings out the best in Yu Yangyi. The Chinese grandmaster fought with great energy and spirit to subdue Wesley So. The American had an excellent position out of the opening and at one point he even held the advantage. However, Yu Yangyi kept finding resources and by the time the players were nearing the 40th move time control, it was already quite messy and complicated. They repeated moves twice and Yu Yangyi could already make a draw by just playing 38.Qh5+. But he did not. He played the quite risky 38.Kg2! which meant that the game was on. Soon Yu had four pawns for a piece and although there were decent theoretical drawing chances for So, it was just too difficult for the knight to cope with this huge armada of pawns in a practical encounter. It is an endgame worth paying careful attention to. Yu Yangyi not only won the game but joined Magnus Carlsen at the top with 7.0/9. So we were going to witness a blitz playoff between Carlsen and Yangyi to decide who would be the Qatar Masters Open 2015 Champion.

[Event "Qatar Masters Open 2015"] [Site "Doha QAT"] [Date "2015.12.29"] [Round "9.2"] [White "Yu, Yangyi"] [Black "So, Wesley"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E21"] [WhiteElo "2736"] [BlackElo "2775"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "153"] [EventDate "2015.12.20"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 c5 5. g3 {Yu Yangyi employs the Kasparov/ Romanishin Variation in the Nimzo Indian.} cxd4 6. Nxd4 O-O 7. Bg2 d5 {Wesley So plays in the most classical fashion as possible.} 8. Nc2 $5 {This move is quite rare when compared to the main move 8.cxd5. But all that Yu Yangyi wants is an original game of chess where he has chances to outplay his opponent.} Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 Qc7 {Wesley was aware of the intricacies in the variation as he made this move keeping an eye on the c4 and c3 pawns.} 10. cxd5 Nxd5 11. Nb4 $5 $146 {The first real novelty of the game.} Nxb4 (11... Nxc3 12. Qc2 $1 { [%cal Gc2c7]} Nd5 13. Qxc7 Nxc7 14. O-O $44 {With excellent compensation.}) ( 11... Qxc3+ 12. Bd2 $1 $14) 12. cxb4 Rd8 13. Qb3 Nc6 14. O-O Nd4 15. Qb2 e5 { Black seems to have got out of the opening with an extremely comfortable position. However, there is a huge imbalance of knight against bishop, and hence Yu Yangyi has hopes to outplay his opponent.} 16. Be3 Bg4 17. Rac1 Qd7 ( 17... Nxe2+ $2 18. Qxe2 Qxc1 19. Qxg4 $18) 18. f3 Bh3 (18... Be6 {Perhaps it made more sense to preserve the bishop with the one on g2 already being not so great.} 19. f4 Bg4 $132 {and with Qb5 coming up there is quite some pressure on the e2 point.}) 19. Rfd1 Bxg2 20. Kxg2 Qe6 21. Rc7 $1 $14 {White has a slight pull in this position, mainly because the rook is well placed on the seventh rank and there is a constant tension between the bishop on e3 and knight on d4, which is White's favour. He can take the knight whenever he wants to.} b6 22. a4 (22. Bxd4 exd4 23. Rc2 {with the idea of tripling on the d-file and winning the d-pawn is also quite strong.}) 22... Nf5 23. Rxd8+ Rxd8 24. Bf2 (24. Bg1 {so that e4-e3 didn't come with a tempo seemed more logical.}) 24... e4 25. Qc2 e3 26. Be1 h5 {Optically Black looks pretty fine. However White still has a pull because the rook is well placed and the a7 pawn is falling. The bishop on e1 looks a tad passive, but it is doing a good job of defending the g3 point and also will not let the knight settle on the d4 square. All in all White is slightly better but Black, thanks to his activity, has excellent chances of equalizing.} (26... Nd4 27. Qd3 $16) 27. Rxa7 $6 { This gives Black a great amount of activity.} (27. a5 $1) 27... Nd4 28. Qe4 Qc4 $1 (28... Qxe4 29. fxe4 Nxe2 30. Kf3 Nc1 31. Kxe3 $16) 29. Qxe3 Nc2 $1 30. Qe7 Nxe1+ 31. Kf2 Qd4+ $6 (31... Rd1 $1 {would have been pretty strong. Of course this requires accurate calculation and also being sure that your king will not be mated.} 32. Qe8+ Kh7 33. Qe4+ (33. Qxf7 Qd4+ 34. Kf1 Nd3+ $19) (33. Ra8 Qd4+ $19) 33... Qxe4 34. fxe4 Nc2 $17 {Is a pretty one sided affair.}) 32. Kf1 (32. Kxe1 Qg1#) 32... Nc2 $6 (32... Rf8 $1 33. Kxe1 Qg1+ 34. Kd2 Qd4+ 35. Kc2 Qc4+ 36. Kd1 Qd4+ $11) 33. Qxf7+ Kh8 34. Qxh5+ Kg8 35. Qf7+ Kh8 36. Qh5+ {That's two times.} Kg8 37. Qf7+ Kh8 38. Kg2 $1 {Not the third! Yu Yangyi changes the move approaching the 40th move time control, asking Wesley to find some tough replies. Black's task is not easy as White already has four pawns as well as a perpetual check in hand all the time.} Ne3+ 39. Kh3 Kh7 40. Qh5+ Kg8 {The 40th move time control is reached and Yu makes a strong move here.} 41. Re7 $1 { The idea is to play Qf7+ followed by Re4 and going to h4.} Rf8 42. a5 $1 { The white king is safe and Black can do absolutely nothing to attack it. Meanwhile the a-pawn is quite a dangerous candidate to become a queen.} bxa5 43. bxa5 Nd5 44. Qe5 $1 {A pragmatic decision. The rook+ 5 pawns endgame can never be lost against the rook+knight+one pawn. So White can enjoy milking the position while Black has to be extremely accurate.} Qxe5 45. Rxe5 Nb4 46. Re4 Nd5 47. Rc4 Rf6 48. Rc5 Rf5 49. Rc8+ (49. e4 $2 Rh5+ 50. Kg2 (50. Kg4 Nf6+ $19) 50... Ne3+ $19) 49... Kf7 50. a6 Ne3 51. g4 (51. a7 Rh5#) 51... Ra5 52. Rc7+ Kf6 53. Rc6+ Kf7 54. Kg3 {White will now slowly set his kingside pawns in to motion.} g5 55. h4 gxh4+ 56. Kxh4 Nd5 57. e4 (57. g5 {With the idea of Kh5 is an even faster way to win.}) 57... Ne7 58. Rb6 Ng6+ 59. Kg3 Ra3 60. g5 Ne5 61. Rf6+ Ke7 {White has made his task a little difficult at this point, but Yu Yangyi finds a way to break this some sort of temporary fortress where none of the white pawns can move.} 62. Kg2 $1 Nd3 (62... Nd7 $1 63. Rh6 Nc5 64. a7 Nd7 65. Rh7+ Ke6 66. f4 Rxa7 {and with the a7 pawn gone the chances of Black securing the draw have considerably increased.}) 63. Rh6 $5 {I like Yu Yangyi's way of converting the win from a human point of view, althought the computer immediately refutes it.} Ra5 $2 (63... Kf7 $1 64. Kf1 (64. a7 Kg7 $11) 64... Kg7 65. Ke2 Nc5 66. Rc6 Nxa6 67. f4 Nb4 68. Rc7+ Kg6 {and once again with the a-pawn gone the chances of Black making a draw have increased considerably.}) (63... Ne1+ 64. Kf2 Nxf3 $2 65. Rh3 $18) 64. a7 $2 (64. Kh3 $5 Rxg5 65. Rh8 $18 {It seems as if White is winning here, but Black has a miraculous defence.} Ne5 $1 66. Re8+ $1 (66. a7 $2 Nxf3 {and we have the famous knight+ rook drawing mechanism.} 67. a8=Q Ng1+ 68. Kh2 Nf3+ 69. Kh3 Ng1+ 70. Kh4 Nf3+ $11) 66... Kxe8 67. a7 Nxf3 68. a8=Q+ Kf7 {And how exactly is White going to win this one?} 69. Qa7+ Kg6 70. Qa6+ Kg7 71. Qb7+ Kg6 72. Qc6+ Kg7 73. Qd7+ Kg6 74. Qd6+ Kg7 75. Qf4 Rh5+ 76. Kg2 Ne5 $11 {White has made progress but it doesn't seem as if he can break this fortress.}) 64... Rxg5+ 65. Kf1 Rg8 (65... Ra5 66. Rh8 $1 Rxa7 67. Rh7+ $18) 66. Ke2 Ne5 $6 (66... Nf4+ $1 67. Ke3 Ne6 {Blocking the rook's path to a6.} 68. f4 Rg3+ $1 69. Kd2 Ra3 70. Rh8 Nf8 $11 {would have been a draw.}) 67. f4 Nd7 68. Ra6 Ra8 69. Ke3 Nc5 70. Ra1 Nb7 $2 {Now it is just lost.} (70... Nd7 $1 71. e5 Ke6 72. Kd4 Kf5 73. Kd5 Kxf4 74. e6 Nf6+ 75. Kd6 Kf5 76. e7 Ne8+ 77. Kd7 Nf6+ $11) 71. e5 $1 Nd8 72. Ra6 Kd7 73. f5 Nc6 74. e6+ Kc7 75. f6 Nb4 76. f7 Kb7 (76... Nxa6 77. e7 $18) 77. Rd6 1-0

The Blitz tiebreak in pictures, analysis and videos

Yu Yangyi and Magnus Carlsen greet each other before their
two game blitz tiebreak of 5 minutes + 3 seconds increment

The arbiters make sure that both the players are on the same page with regards to the rules of the tiebreak

The video contains footage of Magnus Carlsen and Yu Yangyi preparing for their first game of the tiebreak,
the choosing of colours and also the number of people in the audience to watch this match.

Magnus starts with the London System. Both players were unable to get into the rhythm
of playing the shorter time control game and took quite a lot of minutes for their opening moves.

Magnus executed the brilliant 33.Rxe6!! with just about twenty seconds on his clock
and obtained a completely crushing position. Yu had to resign in a few moves.

[Event "Qatar Masters TB 2015"] [Site "Doha QAT"] [Date "2015.12.29"] [Round "1"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Yu, Yangyi"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A45"] [WhiteElo "2834"] [BlackElo "2736"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "83"] [EventDate "2015.12.29"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 {Magnus plays the London System in order to have an original game without much theory.} d5 3. e3 e6 4. Nf3 a6 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Bd6 7. Bg3 Nc6 8. Nbd2 O-O 9. Ne5 Ne7 10. O-O b6 11. Bh4 Nf5 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bf4 Bb7 {The players were playing good chess and logical moves, but somehow they were taking a lot of time. After just 13 moves both were down to almost one and a half minutes.} 14. h3 Be7 15. a4 Nd6 16. f3 Nd7 17. Qe2 Nf6 18. Bh2 Qc8 19. Rac1 a5 20. g4 $1 {Carlsen starts a flank attack after securing his centre. Yu Yangyi has been doing nothing much apart from shuffling his pieces, and hence this is quite a logical follow up.} Qd8 21. Qg2 Nd7 22. f4 Rc8 23. Rce1 cxd4 24. exd4 Ba8 25. g5 $1 {A strong move. Carlsen notices that the queen on d8 is overloaded in defending d7 and attacking g5. Also the bishop on h2 can come in to action after hxg5 fxg5.} hxg5 26. fxg5 Nxe5 27. Bxe5 (27. dxe5 d4 {[%csl Ga8] Absolutely no point in opening up the monster on a8.}) 27... Nc4 28. Nf3 Nxe5 29. Rxe5 Bd6 30. Re2 g6 31. Qg4 Kg7 32. h4 Rh8 {[#] Simply unbelievable play by Magnus who executed the next move with just about 20 seconds on his clock!} 33. Rxe6 $3 fxe6 34. Qxe6 Qe8 35. Qxd6 Rc6 (35... Qe3+ 36. Kg2 Qxd3 37. Qd7+ Kg8 38. Qxc8+ $18) 36. Qe5+ Qxe5 37. Nxe5 {The position is completely winning for White.} Rxh4 38. Rf7+ Kg8 39. Ra7 Rc8 40. Bxg6 Bc6 41. Bf7+ Kf8 42. Ng6+ {An excellent blitz game played by the World Champion.} 1-0

Magnus Carlsen exited the playing hall after winning the first game while Yu Yangyi went to his camp where Ni Hua and Wei Yi waited to give him some instructions – most probably to play faster in game two.

As the game two is about to begin Magnus comes to the board and sits down while Yu Yangyi comes in great hurry, stumbling on the wires before making it to the board

Yu Yangyi played his opening moves with great speed but Magnus was just too solid,
and executed a superb new idea in the Nimzo Indian 4…b6 Variation in the Rubinstein System.

Ahh, I have seen it! Re4 ends the game!

[Event "Qatar Masters TB 2015"] [Site "Doha QAT"] [Date "2015.12.29"] [Round "2"] [White "Yu, Yangyi"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E21"] [WhiteElo "2736"] [BlackElo "2834"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "32"] [EventDate "2015.12.29"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 b6 5. e3 Bb7 6. Bd3 O-O 7. O-O c5 8. Na4 cxd4 9. exd4 Re8 10. a3 Bf8 11. Bf4 {[#]} Bxf3 $1 {The most amazing thing about Magnus is that he knows so much more than his opponents. While Yu Yangyi might have seen this position in passing, Magnus had played it against Karjakin with the white pieces and had come up with an improvement for Black i. e. to take on f3 with his bishop. It's moves like these which win games. The opponent is so surprised that you know something so deep even in this relatively unknown position that he sometimes doesn't follow up in the best possible manner.} 12. Qxf3 Nc6 13. d5 (13. Qh3 {was the best.} Nxd4 $2 14. Be5 $16) 13... exd5 14. cxd5 Ne5 15. Qd1 $4 (15. Bxe5 Rxe5 16. Nc3 $11) 15... Nxd3 {[%cal Re4f4,Re4a4,Ge8e4] When Magnus took this piece, Yu Yangyi sank in to a deep think. He thought for nearly three minutes. Of course for the first few seconds I was trying to figure out what exactly is going on. Why isn't he recapturing on d3. After all that is the only move. But then I saw Re4! which attacks both the undefended pieces on f4 and a4 and realized that not only the game but also the tournament was essentially over!} 16. Qxd3 Re4 {[%cal Re4f4, Re4a4] wins a piece and hence Yu Yangyi resigned, giving Magnus the title of the second Qatar Masters Open 2015.} 0-1

A look of relief and happiness! Henrik and Ingrid Carlsen are
glad that Magnus emerged victorious.

A touch of sadness in the Chinese camp as Yu Yangyi lost the tiebreaks 2-0

Magnus Carlsen is truly the master of playoffs – there hasn’t been a single one which the World Champion hasn’t won. I was a very involved spectator at both the playoffs in the month of December – against Maxime Vachier-Lagrave in London and Yu Yangyi in Qatar. While MVL looked completely exhausted in London, things were much different with Yu Yangyi. The Chinese grandmaster was clearly all pumped up and determined, and basically he was some sort of an unknown commodity for Magnus (although he did beat Yu in the Dubai World Rapid 2014). But the marathon battle against Wesley So in the final round did tire out the 21-year-old. Of course, this fatigue and lack of energy had a role in the final outcome, but I would say the way Magnus played the blitz games was simply outstanding. In the first game the Norwegian played the beautiful 33.Rxe6! with very little time on the clock. Believe me, it is not at all easy to change the tempo all of sudden when so much of maneuvering took place on the moves prior to it. And in the second game Magnus already had the 11…Bxf3 improvement prepared beforehand. I am sure it affected Yu Yangyi quite a bit when the Norwegian immediately chopped the knight on f3, and the blunder on move 15 was partly because of that as well. As of now we can sign off with the conclusion that Magnus Carlsen was the deserving winner of the Qatar Masters Open 2015.

After the tournament ended, the author of these lines was able to interview the
Qatar Masters Open 2015 Champion. Below you can find the YouTube video:

Carlsen on his favourite game in the tournament, how football helped him in the event, whether he
felt more nervous – against MVL in London or Yu Yangyi in Doha, and what are his New Year resolutions

Magnus’ speech at the closing ceremony

US $27,000 and a glittering winner’s trophy. As Henrik Carlsen said to us:
“Back to back victories (London and Qatar) in one month. Magnus is not complaining!”

A part two report with the prize winners, norm winners and
some exclusive pictures from the closing ceremony will follow shortly.

Photos by Amruta Mokal of ChessBase India

Pairings and results for round nine on 29.12.2015 at 12:00

Bo. No. Title Name Rtg Pts.
Res.
Pts. Title Name Rtg No.
1 1 GM Carlsen Magnus 2834
½-½
6 GM Kramnik Vladimir 2796 2
2 11 GM Yu Yangyi 2736 6
1-0
GM So Wesley 2775 4
3 29 GM Akopian Vladimir 2648
½-½
GM Giri Anish 2784 3
4 5 GM Karjakin Sergey 2766
1-0
GM Zhang Zhong 2619 46
5 33 GM Sjugirov Sanan 2646
1-0
GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2748 7
6 9 GM Harikrishna P. 2743
½-½
GM Nguyen Ngoc Truong Son 2642 36
7 13 GM Vitiugov Nikita 2724
½-½
GM Ganguly Surya Shekhar 2648 30
8 34 GM Swiercz Dariusz 2646
0-1
GM Ivanchuk Vassily 2710 16
9 17 GM Ponomariov Ruslan 2710
½-½
  Xu Yinglun 2470 79
10 57 IM Lin Chen 2532
0-1
GM Ni Hua 2693 18
11 28 GM Khismatullin Denis 2654 5
½-½
5 GM Li Chao B 2750 6
12 8 GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2744 5
0-1
5 GM Sethuraman S.P. 2639 37
13 35 GM Vidit Santosh Gujrathi 2644 5
½-½
5 GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2737 10
14 39 GM Piorun Kacper 2637 5
½-½
5 GM Wojtaszek Radoslaw 2723 14
15 20 GM Howell David W L 2688 5
½-½
5 GM Grandelius Nils 2632 40
16 41 GM Naroditsky Daniel 2628 5
½-½
5 GM Fedoseev Vladimir 2664 24
17 25 GM Duda Jan-Krzysztof 2663 5
1-0
5 GM Lenderman Aleksandr 2626 42
18 15 GM Korobov Anton 2713
1-0
5 GM Aravindh Chithambaram Vr. 2486 75
19 47 GM Lu Shanglei 2618
1-0
GM Wei Yi 2730 12
20 21 GM Matlakov Maxim 2684
1-0
GM Bok Benjamin 2594 50
21 111 FM Li Di 2389
0-1
GM Hou Yifan 2683 22
22 23 GM Adhiban B. 2669
½-½
GM Bluebaum Matthias 2590 51
23 27 GM Bologan Viktor 2654
1-0
GM Kosteniuk Alexandra 2542 56
24 70 WGM Goryachkina Aleksandra 2493
0-1
GM Sasikiran Krishnan 2638 38
25 43 GM Salem A.R. Saleh 2622
½-½
GM Al-Sayed Mohammed 2520 62
26 45 GM Ipatov Alexander 2619
1-0
WGM Saduakassova Dinara 2407 106
27 26 GM Dubov Daniil 2655 4
1-0
IM Karavade Eesha 2379 115
28 19 GM Moiseenko Alexander 2689 4
1-0
4 GM Zhukova Natalia 2488 73
29 31 GM Khairullin Ildar 2647 4
0-1
4 IM Gagare Shardul 2470 78
30 44 GM Bartel Mateusz 2620 4
1-0
4 GM Venkatesh M.R. 2451 86
31 83 IM Ly Moulthun 2462 4
1-0
4 GM Hamdouchi Hicham 2597 48
32 49 GM Vocaturo Daniele 2597 4
0-1
4 IM Kashlinskaya Alina 2448 87
33 52 GM Tregubov Pavel V. 2589 4
½-½
4 FM Basso Pier Luigi 2438 93
34 102 IM Vignesh N R 2422 4
½-½
4 GM Rambaldi Francesco 2560 54
35 59 GM Xu Jun 2526 4
1-0
4 IM Tissir Mohamed 2346 121
36 96 IM Aryan Chopra 2436 4
½-½
4 GM Bromberger Stefan 2521 60
37 63 GM Harika Dronavalli 2513 4
½-½
4 FM Rohan Ahuja 2426 99
38 108 IM Saiyn Zhanat 2394 4
½-½
4 IM Yuffa Daniil 2504 66
39 68 GM Khotenashvili Bela 2496 4
1-0
4   Raja Harshit 2325 124
40 119   Roy Prantik 2370 4
½-½
4 IM Sunilduth Lyna Narayanan 2494 69
41 72 GM Shoker Samy 2489 4
1-0
4 WFM Vaishali R 2313 128
42 53 GM Esen Baris 2562
½-½
FM Moroni Luca Jr 2466 81
43 92 IM Wang Yiye 2438
½-½
IM Svane Rasmus 2529 58
44 61 GM Stefanova Antoaneta 2521
1-0
IM Ma Zhonghan 2463 82
45 114 IM Khademalsharieh Sarasadat 2380
½-½
GM Sundararajan Kidambi 2513 64
46 65 GM Schroeder Jan-Christian 2511
1-0
GM Carlsson Pontus 2433 97
47 74 IM Sanal Vahap 2487
1-0
IM Abhishek Kelkar 2393 109
48 118   Firouzja Alireza 2372
1-0
GM Neelotpal Das 2475 77
49 80 GM Krush Irina 2468
½-½
  Mohammad Nubairshah Shaikh 2414 105
50 55 GM Dzagnidze Nana 2559 3
1-0
IM Pham Le Thao Nguyen 2319 126
51 67 IM Batsiashvili Nino 2498 3
½-½
3 FM Abdusattorov Nodirbek 2429 98
52 76 IM Tabatabaei M.Amin 2482 3
1-0
3 IM Nezad Husein Aziz 2425 100
53 84 IM Ali Marandi Cemil Can 2454 3
½-½
3 IM Seyb Alexander 2425 101
54 104 FM Haria Ravi 2416 3
0-1
3 IM Lorparizangeneh Shahin 2454 85
55 88 IM Firat Burak 2446 3
1-0
3 WGM Abdumalik Zhansaya 2390 110
56 89 IM Puranik Abhimanyu 2442 3
1-0
3 IM Guramishvili Sopiko 2368 120
57 129 WIM Derakhshani Dorsa 2307 3
0-1
3 IM Vogel Roven 2439 91
58 90 IM Sagar Shah 2441
0-1
3   Dai Changren 2328 123
59 94   Fang Yuxiang 2438
½-½
IM Li Ruofan 2372 117
60 95 IM Padmini Rout 2437
1-0
WGM Bartel Marta 2271 131
61 112 IM Slavin Alexey 2388
0-1
WGM Pourkashiyan Atousa 2322 125
62 132 WIM Pratyusha Bodda 2260 2
1-0
2 IM Ezat Mohamed 2490 71
63 107   Siva Mahadevan 2400 2
0-1
2 WIM Bivol Alina 2344 122
64 130 IM Piasetski Leon 2287 2
½-½
2 IM Konguvel Ponnuswamy 2377 116
65 113 IM Christiansen Johan-Sebastian 2385
1-0
2 FM Goriatchkin Jouri 2318 127
66 103 FM Gholami Aryan 2422
1
    bye    
67 32 GM Shankland Samuel L 2646 2
0
    not paired    

Final standings (after nine rounds)

Rk SNo Ti. Name FED Rtg Pts  TB  rtg+/-
1 1 GM Carlsen Magnus NOR 2834 7,0 2887 6,8
2 11 GM Yu Yangyi CHN 2736 7,0 2863 14,4
3 2 GM Kramnik Vladimir RUS 2796 6,5 2833 5,1
4 5 GM Karjakin Sergey RUS 2766 6,5 2793 3,6
5 33 GM Sjugirov Sanan RUS 2646 6,5 2791 18,3
6 18 GM Ni Hua CHN 2693 6,5 2762 8,7
7 16 GM Ivanchuk Vassily UKR 2710 6,5 2700 -0,2
8 3 GM Giri Anish NED 2784 6,0 2815 4,3
9 79   Xu Yinglun CHN 2470 6,0 2800 38,4
10 30 GM Ganguly Surya Shekhar IND 2648 6,0 2743 12,0
11 9 GM Harikrishna P. IND 2743 6,0 2736 -0,5
12 17 GM Ponomariov Ruslan UKR 2710 6,0 2720 1,8
13 29 GM Akopian Vladimir ARM 2648 6,0 2713 8,2
14 25 GM Duda Jan-Krzysztof POL 2663 6,0 2697 4,4
15 36 GM Nguyen Ngoc Truong Son VIE 2642 6,0 2691 6,7
16 13 GM Vitiugov Nikita RUS 2724 6,0 2687 -3,4
17 37 GM Sethuraman S.P. IND 2639 6,0 2634 0,3
18 4 GM So Wesley USA 2775 5,5 2753 -1,8
19 6 GM Li Chao B CHN 2750 5,5 2750 0,6
20 7 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar AZE 2748 5,5 2743 -0,1
21 34 GM Swiercz Dariusz POL 2646 5,5 2733 11,5
22 46 GM Zhang Zhong SIN 2619 5,5 2730 14,0
23 14 GM Wojtaszek Radoslaw POL 2723 5,5 2697 -2,6
24 39 GM Piorun Kacper POL 2637 5,5 2677 5,5
25 20 GM Howell David W L ENG 2688 5,5 2676 -0,9
26 45 GM Ipatov Alexander TUR 2619 5,5 2675 7,7
27 41 GM Naroditsky Daniel USA 2628 5,5 2670 6,4
28 21 GM Matlakov Maxim RUS 2684 5,5 2666 -1,8
29 10 GM Jakovenko Dmitry RUS 2737 5,5 2663 -7,9
30 40 GM Grandelius Nils SWE 2632 5,5 2661 4,9
31 15 GM Korobov Anton UKR 2713 5,5 2661 -5,6
32 27 GM Bologan Viktor MDA 2654 5,5 2649 0,1
33 57 IM Lin Chen CHN 2532 5,5 2632 12,3
34 47 GM Lu Shanglei CHN 2618 5,5 2617 1,1
35 35 GM Vidit Santosh Gujrathi IND 2644 5,5 2615 -2,1
36 24 GM Fedoseev Vladimir RUS 2664 5,5 2614 -5,0
37 28 GM Khismatullin Denis RUS 2654 5,5 2605 -4,8
38 22 GM Hou Yifan CHN 2683 5,5 2591 -9,6
39 38 GM Sasikiran Krishnan IND 2638 5,5 2571 -6,3
40 78 IM Gagare Shardul IND 2470 5,0 2706 27,4
41 43 GM Salem A.R. Saleh UAE 2622 5,0 2658 4,9
42 51 GM Bluebaum Matthias GER 2590 5,0 2654 7,8
43 8 GM Tomashevsky Evgeny RUS 2744 5,0 2626 -14,0
44 75 GM Aravindh Chithambaram Vr. IND 2486 5,0 2612 13,7
45 62 GM Al-Sayed Mohammed QAT 2520 5,0 2606 10,2
46 42 GM Lenderman Aleksandr USA 2626 5,0 2570 -6,0
47 83 IM Ly Moulthun AUS 2462 5,0 2569 12,0
48 44 GM Bartel Mateusz POL 2620 5,0 2565 -6,2
49 26 GM Dubov Daniil RUS 2655 5,0 2562 -10,4
50 19 GM Moiseenko Alexander UKR 2689 5,0 2551 -16,0
51 23 GM Adhiban B. IND 2669 5,0 2536 -15,6
52 59 GM Xu Jun CHN 2526 5,0 2531 0,8
53 87 IM Kashlinskaya Alina RUS 2448 5,0 2500 5,8
54 68 GM Khotenashvili Bela GEO 2496 5,0 2491 -1,5
55 72 GM Shoker Samy EGY 2489 5,0 2489 -0,5
56 102 IM Vignesh N R IND 2422 4,5 2655 26,1
57 66 IM Yuffa Daniil RUS 2504 4,5 2606 11,7
58 56 GM Kosteniuk Alexandra RUS 2542 4,5 2604 7,5
59 111 FM Li Di CHN 2389 4,5 2568 40,6
60 50 GM Bok Benjamin NED 2594 4,5 2561 -3,6
61 115 IM Karavade Eesha IND 2379 4,5 2559 20,6
62 99 FM Rohan Ahuja IND 2426 4,5 2546 13,9
63 106 WGM Saduakassova Dinara KAZ 2407 4,5 2538 15,5
64 108 IM Saiyn Zhanat KAZ 2394 4,5 2537 16,9
65 118   Firouzja Alireza IRI 2372 4,5 2534 38,2
66 96 IM Aryan Chopra IND 2436 4,5 2533 11,4
67 52 GM Tregubov Pavel V. RUS 2589 4,5 2526 -7,2
68 93 FM Basso Pier Luigi ITA 2438 4,5 2523 9,7
69 12 GM Wei Yi CHN 2730 4,5 2516 -24,0
70 70 WGM Goryachkina Aleksandra RUS 2493 4,5 2513 1,8
71 119   Roy Prantik IND 2370 4,5 2509 33,6
72 61 GM Stefanova Antoaneta BUL 2521 4,5 2492 -3,5
73 63 GM Harika Dronavalli IND 2513 4,5 2479 -4,1
74 69 IM Sunilduth Lyna Narayanan IND 2494 4,5 2473 -3,4
75 54 GM Rambaldi Francesco ITA 2560 4,5 2471 -10,6
76 60 GM Bromberger Stefan GER 2521 4,5 2459 -7,6
77 74 IM Sanal Vahap TUR 2487 4,5 2414 -9,1
78 65 GM Schroeder Jan-Christian GER 2511 4,5 2404 -12,7
79 92 IM Wang Yiye CHN 2438 4,0 2532 10,8
80 89 IM Puranik Abhimanyu IND 2442 4,0 2532 10,1
81 124   Raja Harshit IND 2325 4,0 2503 39,4
82 48 GM Hamdouchi Hicham FRA 2597 4,0 2492 -11,9
83 121 IM Tissir Mohamed MAR 2346 4,0 2491 16,5
84 114 IM Khademalsharieh Sarasadat IRI 2380 4,0 2482 12,2
85 105   Mohammad Nubairshah Shaikh IND 2414 4,0 2481 8,0
86 81 FM Moroni Luca Jr ITA 2466 4,0 2468 -0,3
87 64 GM Sundararajan Kidambi IND 2513 4,0 2465 -5,5
88 73 GM Zhukova Natalia UKR 2488 4,0 2460 -3,9
89 76 IM Tabatabaei M.Amin IRI 2482 4,0 2455 -3,9
90 49 GM Vocaturo Daniele ITA 2597 4,0 2447 -17,4
91 123   Dai Changren CHN 2328 4,0 2432 24,8
92 31 GM Khairullin Ildar RUS 2647 4,0 2427 -25,6
93 53 GM Esen Baris TUR 2562 4,0 2416 -17,0
94 128 WFM Vaishali R IND 2313 4,0 2391 19,2
95 88 IM Firat Burak TUR 2446 4,0 2387 -7,3
96 85 IM Lorparizangeneh Shahin IRI 2454 4,0 2387 -8,1
97 80 GM Krush Irina USA 2468 4,0 2387 -10,0
98 86 GM Venkatesh M.R. IND 2451 4,0 2387 -7,9
99 91 IM Vogel Roven GER 2439 4,0 2377 -7,8
100 55 GM Dzagnidze Nana GEO 2559 4,0 2357 -23,7
101 58 IM Svane Rasmus GER 2529 4,0 2347 -21,6
102 82 IM Ma Zhonghan CHN 2463 3,5 2501 3,4
103 126 IM Pham Le Thao Nguyen VIE 2319 3,5 2477 16,3
104 109 IM Abhishek Kelkar IND 2393 3,5 2465 7,8
105 98 FM Abdusattorov Nodirbek UZB 2429 3,5 2440 0,5
106 84 IM Ali Marandi Cemil Can TUR 2454 3,5 2430 -3,7
107 97 GM Carlsson Pontus SWE 2433 3,5 2424 -1,6
108 101 IM Seyb Alexander GER 2425 3,5 2422 -0,8
109 67 IM Batsiashvili Nino GEO 2498 3,5 2398 -13,4
110 125 WGM Pourkashiyan Atousa IRI 2322 3,5 2393 15,8
111 95 IM Padmini Rout IND 2437 3,5 2361 -10,0
112 77 GM Neelotpal Das IND 2475 3,5 2336 -17,6
113 110 WGM Abdumalik Zhansaya KAZ 2390 3,0 2430 4,2
114 94   Fang Yuxiang CHN 2438 3,0 2417 -2,7
115 100 IM Nezad Husein Aziz QAT 2425 3,0 2397 -3,3
116 120 IM Guramishvili Sopiko GEO 2368 3,0 2353 -1,6
117 132 WIM Pratyusha Bodda IND 2260 3,0 2350 18,2
118 104 FM Haria Ravi ENG 2416 3,0 2335 -10,0
119 122 WIM Bivol Alina RUS 2344 3,0 2332 -2,2
120 117 IM Li Ruofan SIN 2372 3,0 2325 -5,6
121 129 WIM Derakhshani Dorsa IRI 2307 3,0 2308 0,0
122 90 IM Sagar Shah IND 2441 2,5 2356 -10,8
123 113 IM Christiansen Johan-Sebastian NOR 2385 2,5 2294 -11,4
124 131 WGM Bartel Marta POL 2271 2,5 2292 3,4
125 116 IM Konguvel Ponnuswamy IND 2377 2,5 2292 -10,3
126 103 FM Gholami Aryan IRI 2422 2,5 2218 -20,0
127 112 IM Slavin Alexey RUS 2388 2,5 2193 -19,1
128 130 IM Piasetski Leon CAN 2287 2,5 2165 -11,4
129 32 GM Shankland Samuel L USA 2646 2,0 2387 -12,4
130 127 FM Goriatchkin Jouri RUS 2318 2,0 2235 -17,6
131 71 IM Ezat Mohamed EGY 2490 2,0 2186 -35,3
132 107   Siva Mahadevan IND 2400 2,0 2082 -29,8

Links

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Sagar Shah is an International Master from India with two GM norms. He is also a chartered accountant and would like to become the first CA+GM of India. He loves to cover chess tournaments, as that helps him understand and improve at the game he loves so much. He is the co-founder of the ChessBase India website.
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Álvaro Pereira Álvaro Pereira 1/3/2016 02:48
Right, David Young!
wengardz wengardz 1/2/2016 02:40
Wesley So's demolition job over Ding...
david young david young 1/1/2016 08:17
No, on move 33 a pawn present on the H file. The pawn is no longer there on moves 35 and 37.
Álvaro Pereira Álvaro Pereira 1/1/2016 08:01
Actually both You and So could claim a draw on their game. The same position appeared on moves 33, 35 and 37.
Bertman Bertman 1/1/2016 04:24
@yesendam Call me confused, but why wouldn't someone call Naiditsch an Azerbaijani?
yesenadam yesenadam 1/1/2016 02:05
Wesley So just is not American. Please stop referring to him as 'The American', as it sounds silly and wrong. I wonder what he thinks of that. It's like, uh.. calling Naiditsch 'The Azerbaijani' or something. Lives there, plays for them, yes.
ulyssesganesh ulyssesganesh 1/1/2016 01:36
great coverage! keep it up sagar!
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