Norway Chess 2013 Rd1: Strong start with three wins

5/8/2013 – It was a great start with all games being hard fought and three ending in decisive results. Magnus Carlsen tried his best to beat Topalov, but the Bulgarian held fast. Anand and Aronian drew a sensible game, while Svidler ultimately managed to outclass Hammer in their endgame. Nakamura trounced Wang Hao while Radjabov continued his misery as he lost to Karjakin. Full report with GM commentary.

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Norway Chess 2013

The Norway Chess 2013 Super Tournament is one of the strongest super tournaments ever and is held from May 7th to 18th 2013 in several different locations in the Stavanger-region of Norway: Quality Residence Hotel, Sandnes (six rounds); Stavanger Konserthus, Stavanger (one round); Fabrikkhallen til Aarbakke AS, Bryne (one round); Flor & Fjære, Sør-Hidle (one round).

 

Tourney structure: nine-round round robin
Time control: 100 minutes/40 moves + 50 minutes/20 moves + 15 minutes + 30 seconds/move starting with the first move
Game start: daily 15:00 (server time), last round 12:00
Rest day: 11th May and 16th May
Rules & Tiebreak Rules: The “Sofia rules” will apply. A tie for first place will be decided by a blitz match.

Round one

Round 1: Wednesday May 8, 2013 in Stavanger
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Veselin Topalov
Viswanathan Anand
½-½
Levon Aronian
Hikaru Nakamura
1-0
Wang Hao
Peter Svidler
1-0
Jon Ludvig Hammer
Sergey Karjakin
1-0
Teimour Radjabov

It was a remarkable opening to a tournament bringing together so many top players. As a rule, when gathering such strong competitors, there is always a risk of the battles seeming more like two rams clashing their great horns into a stalemate, but to the delight of the spectators, it was not so.

One could perfectly well cite their combativity as the reason, but there may be other reasons involved as well. Magnus Carlsen will want to ‘wow’ his home fans, assert his undisputed number one status, and of course get in a few digs for his upcoming title challenge against Anand.

Magnus Carlsen nearly let adrenaline get the better of him

Topalov will want to put behind his period of decadence for good, and show his recent win at Zug was not a one off, but a renaissance. Their game showed that spirit, and despite the queens coming off by move nine, they duked it out until move 51. Magnus pressed as he usually does, and very nearly overpressed himself into trouble, but managed to get a grip on his adrenaline and staved off disaster in time. Topalov later explained that his goal this time was to avoid blundering as he had done in the past.

Despite a brilliant win at Zug, Topalov modestly said his goal
had been to not blunder.

Vishy Anand and Levon Aronian fought a good game after a very offbeat Ruy Lopez led to a fairly calm middlegame with both trying to get the other to err, but it was not to be and they drew in 33 moves.

Aronian and Anand during the press conference after their game

The first player to strike blood was Sergey Karjakin, fresh from his victory in the Blitz tournament the previous day, against Teimour Radjabov. The Azeri player has been seeing his Elo in freefall since the Candidates, and has already lost over 50 points in the last couple of months. The opening round at Norway was inauspicious to say the least as he went astray in the opening, a Sicilian Rossolimo with 3…g6, allowing Karjakin to get a protected passed pawn in the center and a strong queenside attack to boot. The Russian built on this and by move 30 was up a pawn, which he duly converted.

When will the sandman come save him from this nightmare?

Hikaru Nakamura scored a nice win against Wang Hao, to continue his run of good form after a second place at the FIDE Grand Prix in Zug. They played a Petroff following the fighting 5.Nc3 line which has led to many a lively tussle, but the Chinese player did not seem to be at his sharpest, and the American soon obtained a significant advantage. By move 27 he was up two pieces for the rook, and that was all he needed to start with a win.

Wang Hao was not at his best in round one

Peter Svidler was playing the second local hero, Jon Hammer, who is also the lowest rated player of the tournament, and as a result had the obligation to win since short of a miracle, Hammer is the participant wearing a big fat bullseye on his back.

For Jon Hammer, it is a singular opportunity to gain experience playing the world's
best, while for the others it is an obligation to score a point against him.

It was hard work as the six-time Russian champion found a very well-prepared opponent in the Gruenfeld, so much so that he quipped, “There was only one Grünfeld expert here today and it wasn't me!”. It took all his savvy to create chances for his opponent to go astray in the endgame, but eventually his perseverance was rewarded and he won a pawn and then the game.

Svidler's rule was to apply pressure until it hurts

Tomorrow is the most anticipated game of the tournament: Carlsen-Anand, and live commentator GM Simen Agdestein remarked this was where the world championship started.

Replay all games

[Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.08"] [Round "1"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Topalov, Veselin"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A30"] [WhiteElo "2868"] [BlackElo "2793"] [PlyCount "102"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. c4 {0} c5 {55} 2. Nf3 {0} Nf6 {24} 3. g3 {12} Nc6 {209} 4. Bg2 {12} d5 {38} 5. cxd5 {50} Nxd5 {38} 6. d4 {77} cxd4 {43} 7. Nxd4 {56} Ndb4 {21} 8. Nxc6 {73} Qxd1+ {6} 9. Kxd1 {4 The position is equal but that has never stopped Carlsen from seeking a way to win.} Nxc6 {5} 10. Nc3 {71} Bd7 {792} 11. Be3 {113} g6 { 33} 12. Rc1 {471} Bg7 {74} 13. Kc2 {278} Rc8 {203} 14. Rhd1 {425} Na5 {680} 15. Bd4 {492} Bf5+ {169} 16. e4 {62} Bxd4 {22} 17. Rxd4 {6} Be6 {282} 18. b3 {235} f6 {330 Black needs to connect his rooks, and castling is worse as it would take the king away from the center.} 19. f4 {275} Kf7 {109} 20. Kb2 {390} Rhd8 {51} 21. Rcd1 {459} Rxd4 {89} 22. Rxd4 {25} Nc6 {217} 23. Rd2 {49} h6 {297} 24. Bf3 {251} Bh3 {359} 25. Nb5 {912} h5 {272} 26. Be2 {368} h4 {358} 27. Bc4+ {27} Be6 {356} 28. Bd5 {124} hxg3 {140} 29. hxg3 {6} a6 {12} 30. Nc3 {254} Rd8 {354} 31. Na4 {325} Bxd5 {57} 32. exd5 {7} Nb4 {22} 33. Nc3 {67} Nc6 {91} 34. Ka3 $1 {374 This move brings the king toward the queenside and in support of the pawn, but it also has a venomous trap behind it.} Na7 {8 Although the trap is obvious, Topalov still needs to do something about it.} ({An example can be seen with} 34... b5 35. dxc6 $1 Rxd2 36. c7) 35. Kb4 {53} Nc8 {74} 36. Ne4 {224 } Nd6 {170} 37. Nc5 {10} Rc8 {90} 38. Ne6 {86} b6 {113} 39. Rh2 {39 Carlsen is pressing hard, but he is in danger of overstepping himself.} Nf5 {79} 40. g4 { 184} Ne3 {85} 41. Rh7+ {3095} Ke8 {3152} 42. Rh8+ {0} Kd7 {0} 43. Rxc8 {0} Kxc8 {0} 44. g5 {0} Nxd5+ {0} 45. Kc4 {0} Ne3+ {0} 46. Kd4 {0} Nf5+ {0 Black is up a pawn, but cannot play for a win due to the superior white king that can go to the queenside or kingside at a moment's notice.} 47. Ke4 {0} Kb7 {0} 48. Nf8 {0} Nd6+ {0} 49. Kd5 {0} fxg5 {0} 50. fxg5 {0} Nf7 {0} 51. Nxg6 {0} Nxg5 {0} 1/2-1/2 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.08"] [Round "1"] [White "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Black "Radjabov, Teimour"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B30"] [WhiteElo "2767"] [BlackElo "2745"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. e4 {0} c5 {0} 2. Nf3 {0} Nc6 {0} 3. Nc3 {0} g6 {40} 4. Bb5 {30} Bg7 {273} 5. O-O {16} e5 {706} 6. d3 {991} Nge7 {191} 7. Bc4 {441} h6 {705} 8. a3 {274} O-O {672} 9. b4 {27} d6 {6} 10. bxc5 {602} dxc5 {96} 11. Re1 {56} Kh7 {613} 12. Nd5 {351} Be6 {604} 13. Nxe7 {131} Qxe7 {3} 14. Bd5 {13} Nd4 {1293} 15. Nd2 {1136} Bxd5 {485} ({All he needed to do was play a logical move like} 15... Rad8 {and there was nothing to worry about.}) 16. exd5 {13 A free protected passed pawn, promising White a long-term advantage.} Rad8 {300} 17. c3 {84} Nb5 {42} 18. c4 {44} Nd4 {53} 19. a4 {91} Qd7 {24} 20. Rb1 {142} b6 {4} 21. Bb2 {125} Rfe8 {53} 22. a5 {68} Qc7 {97} 23. Qa4 {143} f5 {119} 24. axb6 {440} axb6 {4} 25. Bxd4 {7 } cxd4 {3} 26. Qc6 {7 A clever move that liquidates into an endgame with an extra pawn.} Qxc6 {92} 27. dxc6 {3} Rc8 {80} 28. Rxb6 {22} Re6 {1} 29. f4 {100} e4 {48} 30. dxe4 {7} fxe4 {80} 31. Rxe4 {30} Rexc6 {7} 32. Rxc6 {64} Rxc6 {3} 33. Re7 {10} Kg8 {98} 34. Rd7 {9} Bf8 {66} 35. Ne4 {57} d3 {75} 36. Kf2 {45} Ba3 {99} 37. Rd4 {68} Kf7 {32} 38. Ke3 {290} Bc1+ {27} 39. Nd2 {10} Bxd2+ {44} 40. Kxd2 {9} Ra6 {23} 41. c5 {3480} 1-0 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.08"] [Round "1"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Aronian, Levon"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C84"] [WhiteElo "2783"] [BlackElo "2813"] [PlyCount "66"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. e4 {0} e5 {0} 2. Nf3 {0} Nc6 {0} 3. Bb5 {0} a6 {0} 4. Ba4 {0} Nf6 {2} 5. O-O {9} Be7 {6} 6. d3 {59} d6 {12} 7. c4 {44} O-O {45} 8. Nc3 {8} Bg4 {173} 9. Be3 {327} Nd4 {364} 10. Bxd4 {71} exd4 {4} 11. Nd5 {154} c6 {321} 12. Nxf6+ {48} Bxf6 {35} 13. h3 {8} Bxf3 {550} 14. Qxf3 {56} g6 {5} 15. Rae1 {419} Bg7 {86} 16. Qd1 {16} Qb6 {103} 17. Qd2 {108} a5 {167} 18. f4 {101} Qb4 {28} 19. Qc2 {29 } Qc5 {247} 20. Qf2 {275} Rae8 {175} 21. Bd1 {187} f5 {300} 22. Bf3 {51} Bh6 { 1465} 23. Qh4 {499} Bxf4 {205} 24. Qxf4 {358} fxe4 {8} 25. Qg3 {42} exf3 {4} 26. Rxe8 {10} Rxe8 {5} 27. Qxf3 {10} Qf5 {10} 28. Qxf5 {12} gxf5 {4} 29. Rxf5 { 11} Re2 {4} 30. Rf2 {432} Re1+ {35} 31. Rf1 {7} Re2 {4} 32. Rf2 {7} Re1+ {3} 33. Rf1 {8} Re2 1/2-1/2 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.08"] [Round "1"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Black "Wang, Hao"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C42"] [WhiteElo "2775"] [BlackElo "2743"] [PlyCount "83"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. e4 {0} e5 {0} 2. Nf3 {0} Nf6 {0} 3. Nxe5 {3} d6 {0} 4. Nf3 {7} Nxe4 {0} 5. Nc3 {6} Nxc3 {0} 6. dxc3 {6} Be7 {0} 7. Be3 {55} O-O {22} 8. Qd2 {10} b6 {3} 9. O-O-O {242} Bb7 {4} 10. Nd4 {133} Nc6 {139} 11. Nf5 {635} Bf6 {10} 12. h4 {6} Re8 {916} 13. Bg5 {352} Ne5 {191} 14. f4 {514} Ng4 {412} 15. Bb5 {31} Re4 {839} 16. Ng3 {1057} Re6 {1446} 17. Rde1 {59} Rxe1+ {536} 18. Rxe1 {53} h6 {5} 19. Qe2 {761} ({The engines suggest} 19. Re8+ {instead, but after} Qxe8 20. Bxe8 Rxe8 {Nakamura felt that Black would be able to build a fortress.}) 19... Qc8 { 865} 20. Bd3 {1128} Qe6 {428} 21. Qxe6 {200} fxe6 {5} 22. Bxf6 {19} Nxf6 {8} 23. Rxe6 {4} Bxg2 {226} 24. Re7 {67} Nd5 {5} 25. Bc4 {13} Kf8 {229} 26. Bxd5 { 120} Kxe7 {14} 27. Bxg2 {6} Rf8 {12} 28. f5 {24 White is now up two pieces for the rook and Black's defense is anything but easy.} Kf6 {204} 29. Kd2 {378} d5 {51} 30. Ke3 {50} Ke5 {33} 31. Bh3 {12} Rd8 {72} 32. Ne2 {47} c5 {21} 33. Kf3 { 4} Rd7 {233} 34. Nf4 {114} Kf6 {19} 35. h5 {183} a6 {54} 36. b3 {155} Rd8 {41} 37. Ne6 {19} Rd7 {11} 38. Kf4 {5} a5 {40} 39. Bf1 {128} c4 {27} 40. a4 {95} Rd6 {42} 41. Bg2 {3149} Rd7 {17} 42. Bf3 {0} 1-0 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.08"] [Round "1"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Hammer, Jon Ludvig"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D85"] [WhiteElo "2769"] [BlackElo "2608"] [PlyCount "89"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {0} g6 {0} 3. Nc3 {4} d5 {0} 4. cxd5 {5} Nxd5 {2} 5. e4 {4} Nxc3 {15} 6. bxc3 {3} Bg7 {21} 7. Nf3 {40} c5 {10} 8. Be3 {8} Qa5 {8} 9. Qd2 {4} Nc6 {18} 10. Rb1 {138} cxd4 {218} 11. cxd4 {97} Qxd2+ {11} 12. Kxd2 {14 } O-O {15} 13. d5 {1312} Rd8 {121} 14. Bd3 {98} Na5 {86} 15. Bg5 {527} f6 {665} 16. Bf4 {17} b6 {204} 17. Bb5 {1040} e5 {1167} 18. Be3 {31} Bd7 {24} 19. Rhc1 { 383} Bxb5 {210} 20. Rxb5 {11} Nb7 {29} 21. Ke2 {284} Nd6 {267} 22. Rb4 {13} a5 {1147} 23. Rxb6 {77} Nxe4 {20} 24. Nd2 {593} Nxd2 {116} 25. Bxd2 {46} Rxd5 {33} 26. Rc7 {15} Rad8 {421} 27. Bc3 {124 White has been working hard to try and make something from nothing, but it has been hard work.} f5 {731 Black starts to lose his way. With both White's rooks on the 6th and 7th, he had to consider exchanging one pair to ease the pressure.} (27... R8d7 $1 28. Rxd7 Rxd7 29. a4 Rc7 30. Bxa5 Ra7 31. Rb5 e4 (31... Kf7 32. Kd3 Ke6 33. Kc4 {and White is better.}) 32. g4 {to prevent ...f5} Bh6 {cutting off the king from e3 and d2 and the position is equal.}) 28. Rbb7 {117} Bf8 {117} 29. a4 {342} Rc5 { 706} 30. Rxc5 {226} Bxc5 {2} 31. Bxe5 {220} Rd5 {83 Black starts to lose his way.} (31... Re8 {was better here.} 32. f4 Bd6 33. Rb5 Bxe5 34. fxe5 Ra8 35. Kd3 Kf7 36. Kd4 Rd8+ 37. Rd5 Rb8 38. Rxa5 Rb2 39. Ra7+ Ke6 40. Ra6+ Ke7 {would also give White problems, though possibly fewer.}) 32. f4 {383} Bd4 $2 {160 There is a saying that mistakes never come alone.} 33. Rb5 {38} Rd7 {6} 34. g3 {444} Bxe5 {100} 35. Rxe5 {9} Rd4 {36} 36. Rxa5 {3} Kf7 {14} 37. Ra7+ {22} Kf6 {35} 38. Ra6+ {46} Kf7 {12} 39. Ra7+ {116} Kf6 {14} 40. a5 {36} Rd5 {300} 41. Ra6+ {3162} Kg7 {3017} 42. Ra7+ {0} Kf6 {0} 43. a6 {0} Rd6 {0} 44. h4 {0} Ke6 { 0} 45. h5 {0} 1-0

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GM Daniel King provides video analysis of Nakamura vs. Wang Hao 

Playchess commentary schedule

Date Round English German
May 08 Round 1 Lawrence Trent Klaus Bischoff
May 09 Round 2 Lawrence Trent Klaus Bischoff
May 10 Round 3 Daniel King Oliver Reeh
May 11 Free
May 12 Round 4 Chris Ward Klaus Bischoff
May 13 Round 5 Chris Ward Klaus Bischoff
May 14 Round 6 Daniel King Klaus Bischoff
May 15 Round 7 Oliver Reeh Klaus Bischoff
May 16 Free
May 17 Round 8 Daniel King Oliver Reeh
May 18 Round 9 Maurice Ashley Klaus Bischoff

Pairings and results of Norway Chess 2013

Round 1: Wednesday May 8, 2013 in Stavanger
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Veselin Topalov
Viswanathan Anand
½-½
Levon Aronian
Hikaru Nakamura
1-0
Wang Hao
Peter Svidler
1-0
Jon Ludvig Hammer
Sergey Karjakin
1-0
Teimour Radjabov
Round 2: Thursday, May 9, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen Viswanathan Anand
Veselin Topalov Teimour Radjabov
Levon Aronian Hikaru Nakamura
Wang Hao Peter Svidler
Jon Ludvig Hammer Sergey Karjakin
Round 3: Friday, May 10, 2013 in Sandnes
Viswanathan Anand Veselin Topalov
Hikaru Nakamura Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov Jon Ludvig Hammer
Sergey Karjakin Wang Hao
Round 4: Sunday, May 12, 2013 in Bryne
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler
Veselin Topalov Jon Ludvig Hammer
Viswanathan Anand Hikaru Nakamura
Levon Aronian Sergey Karjakin
Wang Hao Teimourgh Radjabov
Round 5: Monday, May 13, 2013 in Sandnes
Hikaru Nakamura Veselin Topalov
Jon Ludvig Hammer Wang Hao
Peter Svidler Viswanathan Anand
Teimour Radjabov Levon Aronian
Sergey Karjakin Magnus Carlsen
Round 6: Tuesday, May 14, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen Teimour Radjabov
Veselin Topalov Wang Hao
Viswanathan Anand Sergey Karjakin
Levon Aronian Jon Ludvig Hammer
Hikaru Nakamura Peter Svidler
Round 7: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 in Sør Hidle
Wang Hao Levon Aronian
Jon Ludvig Hammer Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler Veselin Topalov
Teimour Radjabov Viswanathan Anand
Sergey Karjakin Hikaru Nakamura
Round 8: Friday, May 17, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen Wang Hao
Veselin Topalov Levon Aronian
Viswanathan Anand Jon Ludvig Hammer
Hikaru Nakamura Teimour Radjabov
Peter Svidler Sergey Karjakin
Round 9: Saturday, May 18, 2013 in Stavanger
Levon Aronian Magnus Carlsen
Wang Hao Viswanathan Anand
Jon Ludvig Hammer Hikaru Nakamura
Teimour Radjabov Peter Svidler
Sergey Karjakin Veselin Topalov

Links

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