Norway 2013 Rd5: Carlsen beats Karjakin

5/13/2013 – It was a must win situation for Magnus Carlsen to still dream of first, and it started badly as Sergey Karjakin took the initiative. With his vintage luck of the champions, Karjakin miscalculated and Carlsen went on the attack to score an impressive win. Karjakin leads with 4.0/5, followed by Carlsen and Nakamura with 3.0/5. Jon Hammer scored his first win against Wang Hao. Report with GM commentary.

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Norway Chess 2013

The Norway Chess 2013 Super Tournament is one of the strongest super tournaments ever and is held from May 7th to 18th 2013 in several different locations in the Stavanger-region of Norway: Quality Residence Hotel, Sandnes (six rounds); Stavanger Konserthus, Stavanger (one round); Fabrikkhallen til Aarbakke AS, Bryne (one round); Flor & Fjære, Sør-Hidle (one round).

 

Tourney structure: nine-round round robin
Time control: 100 minutes/40 moves + 50 minutes/20 moves + 15 minutes + 30 seconds/move starting with the first move
Game start: daily 15:00 (server time), last round 12:00
Rest day: 11th May and 16th May
Rules & Tiebreak Rules: The “Sofia rules” will apply. A tie for first place will be decided by a blitz match.

Round five

Round 5: Monday, May 13, 2013 in Sandnes
Hikaru Nakamura
½-½
Veselin Topalov
Jon Ludvig Hammer
1-0
Wang Hao
Peter Svidler
½-½
Viswanathan Anand
Teimour Radjabov
½-½
Levon Aronian
Sergey Karjakin
0-1
Magnus Carlsen

It is hard to imagine a more dire situation for someone still dreaming of an ever more elusive first, than trailing the leader by a full two pointswith a mere five rounds to go. This is the situation Magnus Carlsen was in, with Sergey Karjakin speeding away with a sumptuous 4.0/4 while he was only on 50%. The fifth round game between the two was crucial, since anything less than a win and he knew he would have to readjust his sights for second. His fans are legion as he started with difficult times and a genuine disadvantage he described as “suffering”.

With the luck of the champions, Magnus Carlsen came out on top against Karjakin

Sergey Karjakin had to be growing in increased excitement as the possibility of crowning his run with a win over the world number one became a real prospect, and it was precisely this that gave Carlsen his lifeline. He himself admitted in the press conference that had Sergey played with no ambitions and stuck to containing him he would not have been able to do anything. Magnus agreed the Russian was not wrong to feel his ambitions might be rewarded, but this willingness to fight gave him hope that he might get his chance as well. Whether due to excitement or just some mental lapse during his calculations, something went wrong in Karjakin’s play and a magnificent 33…Nxf4! had to have been a nasty shock. It all went downhill, and with such a show of fireworks, perhaps he will be hired for the New Year’s display.

Magnus Carlsen played 33...Nxf4 with the unspoken words, "You can't touch this."

GM Gilberto Milos annotates Karjakin-Carlsen:

[Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.13"] [Round "5"] [White "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C95"] [WhiteElo "2767"] [BlackElo "2868"] [Annotator "GM Gilberto Milos"] [PlyCount "92"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "6600+2835"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3 O-O 9. h3 Nb8 10. d4 Nbd7 11. Nbd2 Bb7 12. Bc2 Re8 13. a4 Bf8 14. Bd3 c6 15. Qc2 Rc8 (15... Qc7 {seems more natural.}) 16. axb5 axb5 17. b4 Qc7 18. Bb2 Ra8 19. Rad1 Nb6 20. c4 $1 {That is the correct way to attack this structure. White is already better.} bxc4 21. Nxc4 Nxc4 22. Bxc4 h6 23. dxe5 dxe5 24. Bc3 {The pawn on c6 is weaker than b4 and Black has a bad bishop on b7.} Ba6 25. Bb3 c5 26. Qb2 c4 27. Ba4 Re6 28. Nxe5 Bb7 29. Bc2 {White is clearly better after} (29. Bb5 $1 {the point is that Black cannot retake the pawn.} Bxe4 30. Bxc4 Rxe5 31. Bxe5 Qxc4 32. Rd4 Qc2 (32... Qc6 33. b5 Qb7 34. Bxf6 {winning material.} Bxg2 35. Rg4) 33. Qxc2 Bxc2 34. b5 {The b-pawn will cost Black a piece.}) 29... Rae8 30. f4 Bd6 {now Black has counterplay and the position is about even.} 31. Kh2 {A very strange move considering the position of Black's queen and bishop.} (31. Re3) 31... Nh5 $1 32. g3 f6 33. Ng6 {Magnus said that Karjakin played this both quickly and with quite a bit of confidence, and added he was not really sure what Sergey saw, but clearly something had gone horribly wrong in his calculations.} Nxf4 $1 {Carlsen finds the best way and Karjakin is forced to play} 34. Rxd6 (34. gxf4 Bxf4+ {black has a winning attack.} 35. Kh1 (35. Nxf4 Qxf4+ 36. Kh1 Qg3 37. Re2 Rxe4) 35... Rxe4 36. Bxe4 Rxe4 37. Kg1 Bd2 {and the queen enters g3}) 34... Nxg6 35. Rxe6 Rxe6 36. Bd4 { Another mistake. White should bring his queen to defend the king.} (36. Bb1 h5 37. Qf2 {was correct and Black is only a little better.} h4 38. Re3) 36... f5 $1 {another good move to open his bishop.} 37. e5 Nxe5 $1 38. Bxe5 Qc6 39. Rg1 (39. Be4 fxe4 40. Re3 {was the only defense and Carlsen should win in the long run.}) 39... Qd5 {Now it's over. Black has attack and a passed distant pawn to disturb White's pieces.} 40. Bxf5 Rxe5 41. Bg4 h5 42. Bd1 ({Though it would not change anything in the result, Carlsen said he had hoped Karjakin might play} 42. Rd1 {when he would finish in beauty with} Qxd1 $3 43. Bxd1 Re1 { threatening mate with Rh1.} 44. g4 h4 {and White can only defend by giving back the queen with} 45. Qg2 Bxg2 46. Kxg2 Rxd1) 42... c3 43. Qf2 Rf5 44. Qe3 Qf7 45. g4 Re5 46. Qd4 Qc7 0-1

GM Daniel King provides video analysis of Karjakin vs Carlsen 

Although crucial to keep the interest of the top spot alive, it must be pointed out that Karjakin still leads with 4.0/5 and a full point ahead of Carlsen and Nakamura, both on 3.0/5. With only four rounds left, the Russian is still a significant favorite.

Magnus Carlsen analyzes his game against Sergey Karjakin

When told that several players, such as Nakamura, were rooting for a win by Carlsen so as to keep their chances alive as well, Magnus chuckled, “I am glad to be of service.”

Hikaru Nakamura also played a fine game against Veselin Topalov, and seemed to be steering for a very favorable endgame when he stumbled with 19.a3 and the equilibrium was restored. The American shares second with Carlsen at 3.0/5.

Hikaru Nakamura tried hard to break Veseiln Topalov, but to no avail

It is considered common knowledge that last minute cramming for an exam is the worst possible approach and to be avoided at all cost, yet it is a lesson Peter Svidler has apparently never fully digested as he admitted to doing much of his preparation right before the games of the day. Today it turned out to save him as he refuted his preparation after checking a gut feeling he had. The downside is that he had nothing strong to face Anand and the latter equalized quickly with great ease, and they drew. Aronian and Radjabov played a Slav Exchange, but very little took place and the draw was never in doubt.

The second surprise result, to the delight of the Norweigians, was Jon Hammer’s win over Wang Hao after a topsy-turvy game where the edge swung all over the place. The time control was decisive as the Chinese player committed a fatal oversight on move 40, after which Hammer never gave him a chance. This turn came about as Carlsen was analyzing his own win, and he generously commented that it was a pleasure to see both Norwegians win their games after they had both failed to win a game in the first four rounds. Hammer had sworn he was going to play his game in the tournament and planned to chalk up at least one win before the tournament’s end. His wish has been fulfilled.

Jon Hammer fulfilled his promise to not leave the tournament
with his sword unblooded

Replay all games

[Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.13"] [Round "5"] [White "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C95"] [WhiteElo "2767"] [BlackElo "2868"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "92"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "6600+2835"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3 O-O 9. h3 Nb8 10. d4 Nbd7 11. Nbd2 Bb7 12. Bc2 Re8 13. a4 Bf8 14. Bd3 c6 15. Qc2 Rc8 16. axb5 axb5 17. b4 Qc7 18. Bb2 Ra8 19. Rad1 Nb6 20. c4 bxc4 21. Nxc4 Nxc4 22. Bxc4 h6 23. dxe5 dxe5 24. Bc3 Ba6 25. Bb3 c5 26. Qb2 c4 27. Ba4 Re6 28. Nxe5 Bb7 29. Bc2 Rae8 30. f4 Bd6 31. Kh2 Nh5 32. g3 f6 33. Ng6 Nxf4 34. Rxd6 Nxg6 35. Rxe6 Rxe6 36. Bd4 f5 37. e5 Nxe5 38. Bxe5 Qc6 39. Rg1 Qd5 40. Bxf5 Rxe5 41. Bg4 h5 42. Bd1 c3 43. Qf2 Rf5 44. Qe3 Qf7 45. g4 Re5 46. Qd4 Qc7 0-1 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.13"] [Round "5"] [White "Radjabov, Teimour"] [Black "Aronian, Levon"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D12"] [WhiteElo "2745"] [BlackElo "2813"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "62"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "6600+30"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 Bf5 5. cxd5 cxd5 6. Qb3 Qc7 7. Bd2 e6 8. Bb5+ Nc6 9. O-O Bd6 10. Bb4 O-O 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. Nbd2 Rfb8 13. Bxd6 Qxd6 14. Qc3 Qb4 15. Qxb4 Rxb4 16. b3 Nd7 17. a3 Rb6 18. b4 a5 19. Nb3 axb4 20. axb4 Rxa1 21. Rxa1 f6 22. Nc5 Nxc5 23. dxc5 Rxb4 24. Nd4 Rc4 25. Nxc6 Rxc5 26. Ne7+ Kf7 27. Nxf5 exf5 28. Ra7+ Kg6 29. g3 h5 30. Rd7 Rc1+ 31. Kg2 Rd1 1/2-1/2 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.13"] [Round "5"] [White "Hammer, Jon Ludvig"] [Black "Wang, Hao"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A50"] [WhiteElo "2608"] [BlackElo "2743"] [Annotator "Robot 4"] [PlyCount "97"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "6600+2945"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. f3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Ne2 a6 6. Nec3 c6 7. Na3 b5 8. Nc2 O-O 9. Be3 Nbd7 10. cxb5 axb5 11. Be2 Bb7 12. O-O e5 13. Qd2 exd4 14. Bxd4 Qe7 15. a3 Nc5 16. Rad1 Rfd8 17. Bf2 Ne6 18. Bh4 Rd7 19. Qc1 Qe8 20. Rfe1 Nh5 21. Bf1 Be5 22. g3 f6 23. f4 g5 24. fxe5 gxh4 25. exd6 hxg3 26. hxg3 Rg7 27. Ne2 Nxg3 28. Nxg3 Rxg3+ 29. Kf2 Rg7 30. Ne3 Qh5 31. Nf5 Rg5 32. Re3 Qh2+ 33. Ke1 Nf4 34. d7 Rd8 35. Qc3 Rg1 36. Rg3+ Rxg3 37. Nxg3 Qh4 38. Kf2 Kf7 39. b4 Ne6 40. Qf3 Ng5 41. Qf5 Ne6 42. Bh3 Qf4+ 43. Qxf4 Nxf4 44. Bf5 Ke7 45. Rh1 Rh8 46. Ke3 Ne6 47. Bxe6 Kxe6 48. Rxh7 Rd8 49. Nh5 {Kd5} 1-0 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.13"] [Round "5"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Black "Topalov, Veselin"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B84"] [WhiteElo "2775"] [BlackElo "2793"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "75"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "6600+30"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be2 e6 7. Be3 Be7 8. g4 d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxd5 Qxd5 11. Bf3 Qa5+ 12. Qd2 Qxd2+ 13. Bxd2 Nd7 14. O-O-O Ne5 15. Be2 Bd7 16. f4 Nc6 17. Nb3 O-O-O 18. Bf3 Kc7 19. a3 Na7 20. Nd4 Nb5 21. Be3 Nxd4 22. Bxd4 Bc6 23. Rhf1 f6 24. Be2 h6 25. h4 b5 26. h5 Be4 27. Rd2 Kc6 28. Rfd1 Rd7 29. Be3 Rxd2 30. Rxd2 e5 31. c4 b4 32. axb4 Bxb4 33. Rd1 Re8 34. fxe5 Rxe5 35. Bd2 Bxd2+ 36. Kxd2 a5 37. Ra1 Kb6 38. Kc3 1/2-1/2

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Pictures by the official site

Standings after five rounds

Playchess commentary schedule

Date Round English German
May 13 Round 5 Chris Ward Klaus Bischoff
May 14 Round 6 Daniel King Klaus Bischoff
May 15 Round 7 Daniel King Klaus Bischoff
May 16 Free
May 17 Round 8 Daniel King Oliver Reeh
May 18 Round 9 Maurice Ashley Klaus Bischoff

Pairings and results of Norway Chess 2013

Round 1: Wednesday May 8, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Veselin Topalov
Viswanathan Anand
½-½
Levon Aronian
Hikaru Nakamura
1-0
Wang Hao
Peter Svidler
1-0
Jon Ludvig Hammer
Sergey Karjakin
1-0
Teimour Radjabov
Round 2: Thursday, May 9, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Viswanathan Anand
Veselin Topalov
½-½
Teimour Radjabov
Levon Aronian
1-0
Hikaru Nakamura
Wang Hao
1-0
Peter Svidler
Jon Ludvig Hammer
0-1
Sergey Karjakin
Round 3: Friday, May 10, 2013 in Sandnes
Viswanathan Anand
1-0
Veselin Topalov
Hikaru Nakamura
½-½
Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler
½-½
Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov
1-0
Jon Ludvig Hammer
Sergey Karjakin
1-0
Wang Hao
Round 4: Sunday, May 12, 2013 in Bryne
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Peter Svidler
Veselin Topalov
½-½
Jon Ludvig Hammer
Viswanathan Anand
0-1
Hikaru Nakamura
Levon Aronian
0-1
Sergey Karjakin
Wang Hao
½-½
Teimour Radjabov
Round 5: Monday, May 13, 2013 in Sandnes
Hikaru Nakamura
½-½
Veselin Topalov
Jon Ludvig Hammer
1-0
Wang Hao
Peter Svidler
½-½
Viswanathan Anand
Teimour Radjabov
½-½
Levon Aronian
Sergey Karjakin
0-1
Magnus Carlsen
Round 6: Tuesday, May 14, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen Teimour Radjabov
Veselin Topalov Wang Hao
Viswanathan Anand Sergey Karjakin
Levon Aronian Jon Ludvig Hammer
Hikaru Nakamura Peter Svidler
Round 7: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 in Sør Hidle
Wang Hao Levon Aronian
Jon Ludvig Hammer Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler Veselin Topalov
Teimour Radjabov Viswanathan Anand
Sergey Karjakin Hikaru Nakamura
Round 8: Friday, May 17, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen Wang Hao
Veselin Topalov Levon Aronian
Viswanathan Anand Jon Ludvig Hammer
Hikaru Nakamura Teimour Radjabov
Peter Svidler Sergey Karjakin
Round 9: Saturday, May 18, 2013 in Stavanger
Levon Aronian Magnus Carlsen
Wang Hao Viswanathan Anand
Jon Ludvig Hammer Hikaru Nakamura
Teimour Radjabov Peter Svidler
Sergey Karjakin Veselin Topalov

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


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