Norway 2013 Rd4: Sergey Karjakin still perfect

5/12/2013 – Sergey Karjakin is on fire and continues his perfect run with four wins in four games after beating Levon Aronian today. When asked the last time he started with 4.0/4 he replied, "Maybe when I was 10 years old". Magnus Carlsen scored his fourth draw, while Hikaru Nakamura won an excellent game against Vishy Anand and is sole second. Report, videos, and analysis by GM Gilberto Milos.

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Norway Chess 2013

The Norway Chess 2013 Super Tournament is one of the strongest super tournaments ever and is held from May 7th to 18th 2013 in several different locations in the Stavanger-region of Norway: Quality Residence Hotel, Sandnes (six rounds); Stavanger Konserthus, Stavanger (one round); Fabrikkhallen til Aarbakke AS, Bryne (one round); Flor & Fjære, Sør-Hidle (one round).

 

Tourney structure: nine-round round robin
Time control: 100 minutes/40 moves + 50 minutes/20 moves + 15 minutes + 30 seconds/move starting with the first move
Game start: daily 15:00 (server time), last round 12:00
Rest day: 11th May and 16th May
Rules & Tiebreak Rules: The “Sofia rules” will apply. A tie for first place will be decided by a blitz match.

Round four

Round 4: Sunday, May 12, 2013 in Bryne
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Peter Svidler
Veselin Topalov
½-½
Jon Ludvig Hammer
Viswanathan Anand
0-1
Hikaru Nakamura
Levon Aronian
0-1
Sergey Karjakin
Wang Hao
½-½
Teimour Radjabov

The spectators enjoy some rare top-notch chess at Bryne

A remarkable round in many ways, and one that had fans deservedly glued to their screens (or their seats for the lucky ones there). Naturally attention gravitated to the game by Magnus Carlsen with Peter Svidler, and the question was whether this would be the Norwegian’s first win of the tournament.

Magnus Carlsen trying to figure out what is not clicking in the tournament

The opening was certainly exotic, and Carlsen’s Sicilian Moscow ended up with a strange development after Svidler played the very poor 6…Ne5. Sadly for his home fans, Magnus was unable to make the most of his chances and several imprecisions let Svidler reestablish the balance which he never let go of. By move 43 a disappointed Carlsen gave up and they drew. In the post-mortem, he was his usual critical self and said that he would need to up his game not just to reposition himself to try and win the tournament, but to even win a game.

Anand could not stop Nakamura

Those watching Vishy Anand against Hikaru Nakamura certainly had their fill of gritty chess as Nakamura came up with a concept in the Ruy Lopez that was perhaps underestimated by the world champion. After equalizing the American showed fighting resources that allowed him to fight for more and his wish came true as Anand failed to find the best resources. It was an impressive display by Nakamura as he pushed his way forward and outlasted his opponent to take him into sole second. An interesting statistic worth noting in this is only two players in the world have positive scores against Anand: Garry Kasparov and… Hikaru Nakamura.

GM Gilberto Milos annotates Anand-Nakamura:

[Event "Supreme Masters 2013"] [Site "Sandnes NOR"] [Date "2013.05.12"] [Round "4.2"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C78"] [WhiteElo "2783"] [BlackElo "2775"] [Annotator "GM Gilberto Milos"] [PlyCount "78"] [EventDate "2013.05.08"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 {This opening is one of the favourites of Anand so Nakamura's choice was a great surprise for me.} 7. c3 d6 8. d4 Bb6 9. Be3 O-O 10. Nbd2 Re8 11. Re1 Na5 (11... exd4 12. cxd4 Nxe4 $2 13. Nxe4 Rxe4 14. Bd5 {wins}) 12. Bc2 c5 13. dxc5 dxc5 14. Qe2 Ng4 15. Nf1 Be6 16. Ng5 Nxe3 17. Nxe6 fxe6 {The control of the central squares compensates the weakness on the pawn structure.} 18. Nxe3 c4 {Obviously the pressure on f2 is the best choice for Black.} 19. Qh5 Qc7 20. Ng4 Rf8 21. Re2 Rad8 {Black pieces are very active and they can improve by bringing the knight to d3!} 22. Rd1 Rxd1+ 23. Bxd1 Rd8 24. Bc2 b4 {A nice idea. Perhaps not the best one but it creates problems for White.} (24... Nc6 {was safer and the position is about equal.}) 25. cxb4 (25. Rd2 $1 {was the best move and White is better after that. Black should continue with ...Nc6. The rook cannot be taken with} Rxd2 {due to} 26. Qe8#) 25... Nc6 26. Ba4 Nxb4 27. Qxe5 Qe7 28. Qh5 Nxa2 29. g3 $2 {This is probably the decisive mistake.} (29. Ne5 {was correct and the position remains unclear.}) 29... Nc1 30. Rc2 Nd3 {Now Black's pieces are all participating while White's pieces are desconnected with two pieces on each side of the board.} 31. e5 Rf8 32. Rxc4 Bxf2+ 33. Kg2 Bc5 34. Bc6 Rf5 35. Qh4 Ne1+ 36. Kh3 Qf7 $1 {Controlling h5 and f1. The main threat is ...Rh5 winning the queen.} 37. Rxc5 (37. Qd8+ Bf8) 37... Rh5 38. Bg2 Rxh4+ 39. gxh4 Qf5 0-1

This might easily have been the game of the round were it not for the amazing feat by Sergey Karjakin as he scored his fourth straight win, this time against the world number two, Levon Aronian. The opening was exactly the same played by Karjakin and Hammer in round two, but Aronian came prepared with a serious improvement over the Norwegian’s play.  Somehow it did not work out as he planned and the Russian first equalized and then proceeded to outplay his opponent to beat him in an impressive display.

When asked when the last time he had started with four in four, Karjakin replied, “I don’t know, maybe when I was ten…”

GM Gilberto Milos annotates Aronian-Karjakin:

[Event "Supreme Masters 2013"] [Site "Sandnes NOR"] [Date "2013.05.12"] [Round "4.3"] [White "Aronian, Levon"] [Black "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E15"] [WhiteElo "2813"] [BlackElo "2767"] [Annotator "GM Gilberto Milos"] [PlyCount "76"] [EventDate "2013.05.08"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Ba6 5. b3 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Be7 7. Nc3 O-O 8. Bg2 c6 9. e4 d5 10. exd5 cxd5 11. Ne5 Bb7 12. O-O Nc6 13. Bf4 Na5 14. Rc1 Ba3 15. Rb1 Bb4 16. Na4 Ne4 17. a3 Be7 18. cxd5 (18. Qd3 {was played by Hammer against Karjakin two rounds ago.}) 18... exd5 19. b4 Nc6 20. Rc1 Rc8 21. Bh3 {It looks like Levon prepared this position relying on this move.} f5 $1 ({there is a trick after} 21... Rc7 22. Nxf7 Rxf7 23. Bxc7 Qxc7 24. b5 {winning material.}) 22. f3 Nd6 23. Qd3 Nxe5 {Instead of the solid ...g6, Sergey takes risks.} 24. dxe5 {and Levon accepts the challenge. More solid was} (24. Bxe5) 24... Rxc1 25. Bxc1 (25. Rxc1 Nc4 26. Bxf5 Kh8 {is very unclear. The computer evaluates this as equal.}) 25... Nc4 26. f4 {The idea of Bc1. Now the e-pawn is well defended. Karjakin felt this was a decisive blunder.} b5 27. Nc3 {This is a mistake because the d pawn will advance with gain of tempo. Black is already better but two other moves were better than this.} ({The first is} 27. Nb2 a5 $15) ({and the other was} 27. Nc5 Bxc5+ 28. bxc5 d4 $15) 27... Qb6+ 28. Rf2 d4 29. Ne2 (29. Na4 {was the last chance to try to block Black's passed pawn.} Qd8 30. Nb2 (30. Nc5)) 29... Rd8 30. Qxf5 (30. Bg2 Be4 $1 {forcing the advance of the pawn. If} 31. Bxe4 fxe4 32. Qxe4 {The d-pawn starts its march of doom.} d3 33. Nc3 d2) 30... d3 31. Qe6+ Kf8 32. Qf5+ (32. Qxb6 axb6 33. Nc3 d2 {wins a piece.}) 32... Ke8 33. Qxh7 d2 {The rest is easy.} 34. Bxd2 Rxd2 35. e6 Rd1+ 36. Bf1 Qxe6 37. Qh5+ Kf8 38. Nc3 Qc6 0-1

Sergey Karjakin analyzes his game against Levon Aronian, showing what he saw

GM Daniel King provides video analysis of Aronian vs Karjakin 

Tomorrow he faces Magnus Carlsen and the tournament may easily be decided by what happens there.

Veselin Topalov seemed on his way to a fairly smooth victory over Jon Hammer, but lost his way in the endgame and was forced to share the point. Wang Hao and Teimour Radjabov played an interesting Nimzo-Indian Saemisch with 4.f3 that drew, but it turned out that the Azeri was walking into some opening preparation Hao had done over two years ago. While the commentators complimented the Chinese player on his remarkable memory, Hao tried to shrug it off as nothing special. Even Radjabov refused to let that one slide and pointed out that over those two plus years Wang Hao would have looked and prepared at least fifty other lines and openings, and to be able to casually recall some old material he had prepared without looking at it again was definitely remarkable.

Replay all games

[Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.12"] [Round "4"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Svidler, Peter"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B51"] [WhiteElo "2868"] [BlackElo "2769"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "86"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. e4 {0} c5 {0} 2. Nf3 {1} d6 {0} 3. Bb5+ {22} Nd7 {0} 4. O-O {29} a6 {340} 5. Bd3 {39} Ne5 {505} 6. Nxe5 {403} dxe5 {15} 7. a4 {156} Nf6 {624} 8. b3 {198} Be6 {295} 9. Bb2 {229} Bxb3 {439} 10. Qe2 {214} c4 {440} 11. Bxc4 {9} Bxc4 {1} 12. Qxc4 {7} Rc8 {4} 13. Qb3 {955} Qc7 {28} 14. d3 {212} e6 {398} 15. Nd2 {92} Nd7 {78} 16. Nc4 {385} b6 {453} 17. Kh1 {244} Rb8 {480} 18. Qc3 {873} f6 {191} 19. g3 {312} b5 {532} 20. axb5 {397} axb5 {30} 21. Ne3 {9} Qxc3 {570} 22. Bxc3 {2} b4 {16} 23. Bd2 {80} b3 {18} 24. cxb3 {9} Rxb3 {44} 25. Ra8+ {7} Rb8 {161} 26. Rxb8+ {84} Nxb8 {22} 27. Rc1 {200} Kd7 {78} 28. Rb1 {214} Nc6 {53} 29. Nc4 {271} Be7 {85} 30. f4 {100} exf4 {70} 31. gxf4 {66} Rb8 {45} 32. Rxb8 {7} Nxb8 {5} 33. Kg2 {10} Nc6 {6} 34. Bc3 {6} Bc5 {93} 35. Kf3 {142} Nd4+ {95} 36. Bxd4 {22} Bxd4 {1} 37. f5 {35} g6 {54} 38. fxe6+ {42} Kxe6 {4} 39. h3 {5} h5 {74} 40. Na5 {6} Bb6 {32} 41. Nc4 {2978} Bd4 {2971} 42. Na5 {0} Bb6 {0} 43. Nc4 {0} Bd4 {0} 1/2-1/2 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.12"] [Round "4"] [White "Aronian, Levon"] [Black "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E15"] [WhiteElo "2813"] [BlackElo "2767"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "76"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {0} e6 {0} 3. Nf3 {4} b6 {1} 4. g3 {10} Ba6 {5} 5. b3 { 6} Bb4+ {6} 6. Bd2 {6} Be7 {5} 7. Nc3 {7} O-O {14} 8. Bg2 {7} c6 {15} 9. e4 {6} d5 {6} 10. exd5 {6} cxd5 {7} 11. Ne5 {6} Bb7 {10} 12. O-O {11} Nc6 {6} 13. Bf4 {5} Na5 {16} 14. Rc1 {11} Ba3 {9} 15. Rb1 {5} Bb4 {10} 16. Na4 {6} Ne4 {50} 17. a3 {31} Be7 {17} 18. cxd5 {17} exd5 {203} 19. b4 {222} Nc6 {102} 20. Rc1 {160} Rc8 {955} 21. Bh3 {425} f5 {21} 22. f3 {1090} Nd6 {264} 23. Qd3 {287} Nxe5 { 1160} 24. dxe5 {248} Rxc1 {23} 25. Bxc1 {451} Nc4 {25} 26. f4 {14} b5 {321} 27. Nc3 {447} Qb6+ {311} 28. Rf2 {21} d4 {23} 29. Ne2 {503} Rd8 {57} 30. Qxf5 {15} d3 {38} 31. Qe6+ {5} Kf8 {39} 32. Qf5+ {153} Ke8 {1326} 33. Qxh7 {660} d2 {825} 34. Bxd2 {170} Rxd2 {29} 35. e6 {486} Rd1+ {77} 36. Bf1 {11} Qxe6 {9} 37. Qh5+ {22} Kf8 {188} 38. Nc3 {234} Qc6 {70} 0-1 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.12"] [Round "4"] [White "Wang, Hao"] [Black "Radjabov, Teimour"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E25"] [WhiteElo "2743"] [BlackElo "2745"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "64"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {0} e6 {16} 3. Nc3 {33} Bb4 {22} 4. f3 {394} d5 {157} 5. a3 {5} Bxc3+ {219} 6. bxc3 {13} c5 {97} 7. cxd5 {6} Nxd5 {71} 8. dxc5 {7} Qa5 {160} 9. e4 {8} Nf6 {16} 10. Be3 {84} O-O {61} 11. Qb3 {244} Nfd7 {533} 12. a4 {114} Qc7 {197} 13. Qa3 {15} b6 {44} 14. a5 {74} bxc5 {90} 15. a6 {6} c4 {46 } 16. Qa5 {7} Qxa5 {358} 17. Rxa5 {8} Nc6 {15} 18. Ra2 {606} Nde5 {1247} 19. f4 {192} Ng4 {50} 20. Bc1 {302} Rb8 {244} 21. Nh3 {774} Rb1 {1281} 22. Kd2 {36} Rb6 {124} 23. Bxc4 {906} Nb8 {6} 24. Be2 {241} Nf6 {446} 25. Nf2 {423} Bxa6 {78 } 26. c4 {155} Rc6 {679} 27. Kc3 {226} Rfc8 {82} 28. Ra4 {92} Nfd7 {83} 29. Be3 {213} Nb6 {9} 30. Bxb6 {91} axb6 {11} 31. Kd4 {316} b5 {246} 32. cxb5 {256} Rd8+ {14} 1/2-1/2 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.12"] [Round "4"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C78"] [WhiteElo "2783"] [BlackElo "2775"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "78"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. e4 {0} e5 {0} 2. Nf3 {0} Nc6 {0} 3. Bb5 {0} a6 {0} 4. Ba4 {0} Nf6 {0} 5. O-O {0} b5 {0} 6. Bb3 {5} Bc5 {0} 7. c3 {11} d6 {5} 8. d4 {7} Bb6 {5} 9. Be3 {6} O-O {62} 10. Nbd2 {8} Re8 {17} 11. Re1 {49} Na5 {49} 12. Bc2 {54} c5 {14} 13. dxc5 {329} dxc5 {65} 14. Qe2 {140} Ng4 {841} 15. Nf1 {38} Be6 {6} 16. Ng5 {705} Nxe3 {41} 17. Nxe6 {6} fxe6 {3} 18. Nxe3 {9} c4 {3} 19. Qh5 {411} Qc7 {323} 20. Ng4 {293} Rf8 {50} 21. Re2 {66} Rad8 {107} 22. Rd1 {272} Rxd1+ {884} 23. Bxd1 { 6} Rd8 {53} 24. Bc2 {618} b4 {771} 25. cxb4 {625} Nc6 {31} 26. Ba4 {150} Nxb4 { 865} 27. Qxe5 {516} Qe7 {106} 28. Qh5 {245} Nxa2 {495} 29. g3 {377} Nc1 {51} 30. Rc2 {105} Nd3 {9} 31. e5 {339} Rf8 {533} 32. Rxc4 {462} Bxf2+ {43} 33. Kg2 {21} Bc5 {315} 34. Bc6 {301} Rf5 {130} 35. Qh4 {28} Ne1+ {4} 36. Kh3 {20} Qf7 { 4} 37. Rxc5 {247} Rh5 {7} 38. Bg2 {84} Rxh4+ {6} 39. gxh4 {4} Qf5 {36} 0-1 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.12"] [Round "4"] [White "Topalov, Veselin"] [Black "Hammer, Jon Ludvig"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D71"] [WhiteElo "2793"] [BlackElo "2608"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "111"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {0} g6 {0} 3. g3 {0} c6 {5} 4. Bg2 {16} d5 {8} 5. e3 {4 } Bg7 {130} 6. Ne2 {34} O-O {113} 7. O-O {14} b6 {17} 8. b3 {179} Bb7 {62} 9. Nbc3 {168} Nbd7 {434} 10. a4 {430} Re8 {497} 11. Ba3 {511} e6 {910} 12. Rc1 { 429} Ba6 {642} 13. Qc2 {376} Rc8 {123} 14. Qa2 {116} Bf8 {132} 15. Bxf8 {29} Rxf8 {37} 16. Rfd1 {445} Qe7 {116} 17. Nf4 {42} dxc4 {236} 18. bxc4 {5} e5 {10} 19. Nd3 {7} exd4 {391} 20. exd4 {77} Qd6 {17} 21. Ne2 {444} Rfe8 {586} 22. Nef4 {859} Rcd8 {1264} 23. h4 {715} c5 {54} 24. dxc5 {458} Nxc5 {5} 25. Nd5 {169} Nxd5 {26} 26. Bxd5 {41} Nxd3 {584} 27. Rxd3 {6} Qc7 {4} 28. Qd2 {300} Bb7 {25} 29. h5 {14} Bxd5 {348} 30. cxd5 {7} Qe5 {0} 31. h6 {146} Qh5 {4} 32. d6 {35} Re2 {15} 33. Qf4 {282} Qe5 {5} 34. Qf3 {237} Re1+ {14} 35. Rxe1 {6} Qxe1+ {3} 36. Kg2 {12} Qe6 {5} 37. Qc6 {106} f6 {88} 38. Qc7 {124} Qd7 {3} 39. Qc4+ {42} Kf8 {44} 40. Rd1 {101} Qb7+ {27} 41. Kg1 {3020} Qf7 {196} 42. Qb4 {0} Qe6 {60} 43. a5 {0} bxa5 {2} 44. Qxa5 {0} Rd7 {78} 45. Qc5 {0} Kf7 {40} 46. Qc2 {0} a5 { 571} 47. Rd4 {0} a4 {121} 48. Rxa4 {0} Qxd6 {31} 49. Ra1 {0} Qe6 {169} 50. Ra8 {0} Qd5 {107} 51. Ra1 {0} Qe6 {0} 52. Rb1 {0} Qf5 {235} 53. Qc4+ {0} Qe6 {0} 54. Qa4 {0} Qd5 {28} 55. Re1 {0} g5 {201} 56. Qc2 {0} 1/2-1/2

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Levon Aronian and Wang Hao enjoy a moment in the parking lot near the chessmobiles

Pictures by the official site

Standings after four rounds

Playchess commentary schedule

Date Round English German
May 13 Round 5 Chris Ward Klaus Bischoff
May 14 Round 6 Daniel King Klaus Bischoff
May 15 Round 7 Oliver Reeh Klaus Bischoff
May 16 Free
May 17 Round 8 Daniel King Oliver Reeh
May 18 Round 9 Maurice Ashley Klaus Bischoff

Pairings and results of Norway Chess 2013

Round 1: Wednesday May 8, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Veselin Topalov
Viswanathan Anand
½-½
Levon Aronian
Hikaru Nakamura
1-0
Wang Hao
Peter Svidler
1-0
Jon Ludvig Hammer
Sergey Karjakin
1-0
Teimour Radjabov
Round 2: Thursday, May 9, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Viswanathan Anand
Veselin Topalov
½-½
Teimour Radjabov
Levon Aronian
1-0
Hikaru Nakamura
Wang Hao
1-0
Peter Svidler
Jon Ludvig Hammer
0-1
Sergey Karjakin
Round 3: Friday, May 10, 2013 in Sandnes
Viswanathan Anand
1-0
Veselin Topalov
Hikaru Nakamura
½-½
Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler
½-½
Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov
1-0
Jon Ludvig Hammer
Sergey Karjakin
1-0
Wang Hao
Round 4: Sunday, May 12, 2013 in Bryne
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Peter Svidler
Veselin Topalov
½-½
Jon Ludvig Hammer
Viswanathan Anand
0-1
Hikaru Nakamura
Levon Aronian
0-1
Sergey Karjakin
Wang Hao
½-½
Teimour Radjabov
Round 5: Monday, May 13, 2013 in Sandnes
Hikaru Nakamura Veselin Topalov
Jon Ludvig Hammer Wang Hao
Peter Svidler Viswanathan Anand
Teimour Radjabov Levon Aronian
Sergey Karjakin Magnus Carlsen
Round 6: Tuesday, May 14, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen Teimour Radjabov
Veselin Topalov Wang Hao
Viswanathan Anand Sergey Karjakin
Levon Aronian Jon Ludvig Hammer
Hikaru Nakamura Peter Svidler
Round 7: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 in Sør Hidle
Wang Hao Levon Aronian
Jon Ludvig Hammer Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler Veselin Topalov
Teimour Radjabov Viswanathan Anand
Sergey Karjakin Hikaru Nakamura
Round 8: Friday, May 17, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen Wang Hao
Veselin Topalov Levon Aronian
Viswanathan Anand Jon Ludvig Hammer
Hikaru Nakamura Teimour Radjabov
Peter Svidler Sergey Karjakin
Round 9: Saturday, May 18, 2013 in Stavanger
Levon Aronian Magnus Carlsen
Wang Hao Viswanathan Anand
Jon Ludvig Hammer Hikaru Nakamura
Teimour Radjabov Peter Svidler
Sergey Karjakin Veselin Topalov

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


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