Norway 2013 Rd2: Karjakin has 2.0/2

5/9/2013 – For obvious reasons, the center of attention was the game between Magnus Carlsen and Vishy Anand, which ended in a draw after a tense fight. Topalov and Radjabov also drew, while Aronian overcame Nakamura despite the American’s creative defensive tries. Svidler went down to Wang Hao, and Karjakin took the lead with a win over Hammer. Report, videos, and analysis by GM Gilberto Milos.

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Norway Chess 2013

The Norway Chess 2013 Super Tournament is one of the strongest super tournaments ever and is held from May 7th to 18th 2013 in several different locations in the Stavanger-region of Norway: Quality Residence Hotel, Sandnes (six rounds); Stavanger Konserthus, Stavanger (one round); Fabrikkhallen til Aarbakke AS, Bryne (one round); Flor & Fjære, Sør-Hidle (one round).

 

Tourney structure: nine-round round robin
Time control: 100 minutes/40 moves + 50 minutes/20 moves + 15 minutes + 30 seconds/move starting with the first move
Game start: daily 15:00 (server time), last round 12:00
Rest day: 11th May and 16th May
Rules & Tiebreak Rules: The “Sofia rules” will apply. A tie for first place will be decided by a blitz match.

Round two

Round 2: Thursday, May 9, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Viswanathan Anand
Veselin Topalov
½-½
Teimour Radjabov
Levon Aronian
1-0
Hikaru Nakamura
Wang Hao
1-0
Peter Svidler
Jon Ludvig Hammer
0-1
Sergey Karjakin

A rapt audience watches the games up close

It was another round of hard fought chess, and though far from perfect, the entertainment was assured. The main focus of the round was quite obviously the game between Magnus Carlsen and Vishy Anand, a game that GM Simen Agdestein dubbed ‘the first game of the world championship’.

A tense struggle worthy of the two players

In fact, in the press conference after the game (see the video below) Anand pointed out that while either player would get a boost from winning, the match would still start with a blank slate, so it was not quite accurate to call it such. In any case, if the opening and development are any indication, their actual match will be a treat. The two played a Sicilian Moscow variation but a mistake by the world champion put him at a serious disadvantage and his fans worried he might not hold. It was nervous times for all, but a missed resource by the Norwegian held Black’s position together, and the danger passed. Despite the issues, it was a moral victory for Anand, who not only held Carlsen with black, but also came back from a very dodgy situation to avoid disaster.

GM Gilberto Milos comments Carlsen-Anand:

[Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.09"] [Round "2"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B51"] [WhiteElo "2868"] [BlackElo "2783"] [Annotator "GM Gilberto Milos"] [PlyCount "118"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. e4 {0} c5 {0} 2. Nf3 {0} d6 {0} 3. Bb5+ {0 The last time they played this variation was in 2012 and Magnus won. In that game Anand played ...Bd7.} Nd7 {0 } 4. d4 {0} cxd4 {0} 5. Qxd4 {9} a6 {3} 6. Bxd7+ {38} Bxd7 {7} 7. c4 {58} e5 { 93} 8. Qd3 {9} b5 {45} (8... h6 {with the idea of ...Nf6 without allowing the pin Bg5 as in the game Tiviakov-Anand (2012) won by White.}) 9. Nc3 {436} bxc4 {416} 10. Qxc4 {12} Be6 {49} 11. Qd3 {1485} (11. Nd5 {would be a mistake in view of} Qa5+ 12. Bd2 Bxd5) 11... h6 {132 In the next moves both players fight for the control of the extremely important d5 square.} 12. O-O {6} Nf6 {7} 13. Rd1 {7} Be7 {51} 14. Ne1 {42} O-O {90} 15. Nc2 {95} Qb6 {217} 16. Ne3 {180} Rfc8 {261} 17. b3 {267} a5 {323} 18. Bd2 {327} Qa6 {783} 19. Be1 {88} Nd7 {172} 20. f3 {388} Rc6 {437} 21. Qxa6 {41} Rcxa6 {88} 22. Ned5 {617} (22. Rac1 Bg5) 22... Bd8 {33} 23. Nb5 {33} Rc8 {371} 24. Bf2 {443} ({A very logical move would be} 24. Rac1 {and the game could follow} Rxc1 25. Rxc1 Bxd5 26. exd5 Bb6+ 27. Bf2 Bc5 28. a4 f5 {with a very small advantage for White thanks to his well-placed knight.}) 24... Kh7 {464 A strange move moving away from the center. Other options were:} (24... Rac6 $4 25. Na7) (24... Kf8 {is certainly the most normal move.}) (24... Rc2 25. a4 Rac6 26. Na3 Rb2 27. Nc4 $14 Rxb3 $2 28. Nxa5 $18) 25. Kf1 {219} Rcc6 {255} 26. Rac1 {161} Bg5 {192} 27. Rc3 {76} ({ It seems that Magnus missed an opportunity here. The following variations show White might have gotten a good advantage after} 27. Rxc6 $1 Rxc6 28. Ndc7 Rc2 ( 28... Be7 29. Be1 a4 30. Nxe6 fxe6 31. bxa4 $16) 29. Nxe6 fxe6 30. Rxd6 $16 Rc1+ 31. Ke2 Rc2+ 32. Ke1 Nf8 (32... Rc1+ $2 33. Rd1 $18) 33. a3 {and here White has a clear advantage. The position is far from winning but this is the best chance I found in this game. A possible continuation that shows how White can improve from here could be} Ra2 34. g3 h5 35. h4 Be7 (35... Bh6 36. Bb6) 36. Rd2 Ra1+ 37. Rd1 Ra2 38. Be3 Kg6 (38... Bxa3 39. Nxa3 Rxa3 40. Bc5) 39. Rd2 Ra1+ 40. Ke2 Kf7 41. Bb6 Bxa3 42. Bxa5 Be7 43. Bc3 Rb1 44. Rb2) 27... Bxd5 {262 } 28. Rxd5 {25} Rxc3 {75} 29. Nxc3 {2} Rc6 {80} 30. Be1 {23} Nc5 {32 White is still better but Black's position is defendable.} 31. Nb5 {887} (31. g3 Kg6 32. Ke2 {was also possible but nothing special.}) 31... Nb7 {169} 32. h4 {285} Be3 {43} 33. Ke2 {30} Bc5 {13} 34. h5 {174} Bb4 {113} 35. Bd2 {66} (35. Bxb4 axb4 36. a3 $14) 35... g6 {146 it's time to centralize the king.} 36. a3 {173} Bxd2 {7} 37. hxg6+ {5} Kxg6 {6} 38. Kxd2 {6} h5 {16} 39. g3 {65} f6 {228} 40. Na7 { 53} Rc7 {290} 41. Nb5 {3061} Rc6 {2985} 42. Ke2 {0} Kf7 {0} 43. b4 {0} axb4 {0} 44. axb4 {0} Ke6 {0} 45. Rd3 {0} Rc4 {0} 46. Rb3 {0} d5 {0} 47. Kd3 {0} Rc6 {0} 48. exd5+ {0} Kxd5 {0} 49. Rc3 {0} f5 {0} 50. Nc7+ {0} Kd6 {0} 51. Ne8+ {0} Kd5 {0} 52. Rxc6 {0} Kxc6 {0} 53. Ng7 {0} Nd6 {0} 54. Nxh5 {0} e4+ {0} 55. fxe4 {0} Nxe4 {0} 56. Kd4 {0} Kb5 {0} 57. g4 {0} fxg4 {0} 58. Kxe4 {0} g3 {0} 59. Nxg3 { 0} Kxb4 {0} 1/2-1/2

 

A fascinating post-mortem by Magnus Carlsen and Vishy Anand who also took questions from the press

Veselin Topalov and Teimour Radjabov played a complicated game stemming from a Sicilian Rossolimo without …g6 and the Azeri sprang a novelty (10…Ne5) he himself described as being something one might expect from an amateur. It seemed to defy the usual rules of play, but both players seemed to conclude it worked and was a viable solution to improve the knight’s position. A very complicated middlegame ensued with both players finding the right moves, avoiding trouble, but not a struggle. They drew on move 40, by which time the shake of the hands had been clear for some time.

Teimour Radjabov: playing the opening like an amateur

Jon Hammer faced Sergey Karjakin, and they played a Queen’s Indian, following Leko-Karjakin from the FIDE GP in Zug less than two weeks ago. Although the Norwegian was the first with the novelty, two moves later he began to spend inordinate amounts of time and it was clear that the Russian had played something unexpected.

That is the look of a man headed for a perfect start

After a surprising 25…Ne5!, the advantage passed into Black’s hands. Although it took them 30 moves to seal the result, it was never really in doubt. After his victory in the opening blitz tournament and two wins in the first rounds, it would not be a shock to read Karjakin was considering permanent residency.

A somewhat unexpected result came from the game between Wang Hao and Peter Svidler. In round one, Svidler had shown grit in beating Hammer, while Wang Hao was a shadow of himself against Nakamura, yet somehow the roles were reversed today. For Svidler it was another Gruenfeld, this time of his choosing, and once again it did not go well for him. This time it went worse as he found himself with worse development facing a monster center by White. 

Hao-Svidler wasn't the cleanest win, but it was still a win

It did not take long for the Chinese player to reach a winning advantage, but somehow he kept on letting Svidler play a little long, hope a little longer.  It almost seemed as if he might let the Russian off the hook, but he ultimately converted to the full point.

GM Gilberto Milos comments Hao-Svidler:

[Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.09"] [Round "2"] [White "Wang, Hao"] [Black "Svidler, Peter"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D70"] [WhiteElo "2743"] [BlackElo "2769"] [Annotator "GM Gilberto Milos"] [PlyCount "125"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {0} g6 {0} 3. f3 {0 The popularity of this move has been increasing recently.} d5 {363} 4. cxd5 {0} Nxd5 {4} 5. e4 {0} Nb6 {4} 6. Nc3 {0} Bg7 {6} 7. Be3 {1} O-O {72} 8. Qd2 {4} Nc6 {17} 9. O-O-O {7} Qd6 {2} ( 9... e5 10. d5 Nd4 {is very natural and one of the main lines.}) 10. Nb5 {20} Qd7 {137} 11. f4 {21 '!'} Qe6 {227} 12. Nc3 {8} Nc4 {67} 13. Qe2 {7 This is all theory and Svidler plays a novelty here.} Nxe3 {6} (13... N6a5 {was played before in the game Karjakin-Giri (2013).}) 14. Qxe3 {4} Nb4 {612} 15. Kb1 {826} Rd8 {535} (15... c6 {was playable and Black is ok.}) 16. Nf3 {540} b5 {324 '?!' This is the point and is Peter's idea. Though very nice and interesting, it is not good enough as will be seen.} 17. a3 {1090} Na6 {1198} (17... Nd5 18. Nxd5 Rxd5 19. Ng5 {winning the exchange.}) 18. Bxb5 {311 White is forced to accept the pawn in view of the treat ...b4 but the material advantage proved to be decisive.} Qb6 {351} 19. Ne5 {315 '!'} Bxe5 {88} 20. fxe5 {26} Rb8 {2} 21. Rd2 {393} Qa5 {747 It seems Black has counterplay but the b-file is not as important as White's material advantage.} 22. Bxa6 {184} (22. Bc4 Qxa3 23. Rf1 {was also very strong}) 22... Bxa6 {60} 23. Nd5 {22} Rb3 {306} ({The option was } 23... Rxd5 24. exd5 Bc4 25. Rc1 {and White is much better.}) 24. Nxe7+ {447} Kf8 {10} 25. Qxb3 {47} Qxd2 {3} 26. Nc6 {9} Qxg2 {29} 27. Re1 {173} Re8 {68} 28. Qc2 {658 A human move going to a much better endgame.} ({The computer suggests} 28. Qb4+ Kg8 29. d5) 28... Qxc2+ {238} 29. Kxc2 {61} Bb5 {1 '!'} 30. Nxa7 {693} Bd7 {36} 31. Rf1 {21 '!'} f5 {442} (31... Ra8 32. e6 Bxe6 33. Nc6) 32. exf5 {158} (32. exf6 $2 Ra8) 32... gxf5 {12} 33. Kc3 {190 The endgame is winning for White and the Chinese won, However at several moments he did not choose the best continuation and gave his opponent small chances.} (33. Rf3 Ra8 34. e6 {was more precise.}) 33... Ra8 {90} 34. e6 {91} Bxe6 {2} 35. Nc6 {116} Kg7 {24} 36. d5 {111} Bxd5 {92} 37. Nd4 {71} Be4 {112} 38. Nxf5+ {24} Kg6 {2} 39. Nd4 {66} Ra5 {29} 40. Ne6 {294} Bf5 {98} 41. Nd4 {217} Bd7 {0} 42. Rf2 {91} h5 {249} 43. Kd3 {347} Rg5 {254} 44. Nf3 {181} Ra5 {2} 45. Kd4 {108} Ra4+ {45} 46. Ke3 {0} Bf5 {0} 47. Nd4 {0} Bd7 {27} 48. Rc2 {0} Ra7 {0} 49. h4 {85} Kf6 {0 } 50. Rc5 {30} Be8 {46} 51. Rf5+ {371} Ke7 {68} 52. Re5+ {51} Kd7 {8} 53. Nb3 { 80} Bf7 {1} 54. Nc5+ {151} Kd6 {0} 55. Kd4 {23} Ra8 {0} 56. Rf5 {191} Ke7 {0} 57. a4 {53} Rg8 {0} 58. Rf4 {98} Rg2 {109} 59. b4 {18} Rd2+ {271} 60. Kc3 {85} Ra2 {3} 61. a5 {999} Ra1 {1035} 62. a6 {738} Be8 {124} 63. Re4+ {41} 1-0

 

The game between Levon Aronian and Hikaru Nakamura was a similar story. An offbeat Slav was played, and the Armenian developed with 12…Nge2. The American got a bit adventurous with 18…e5 and the game went downhill. Despite several creative attempts to defend, that impressed even Aronian it was not enough to save the game, and little by little he lost ground for a win by the Armenian.

Unlike Karjakin, Nakamura was unable to repeat his first round success

Replay all games

[Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.09"] [Round "2"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B51"] [WhiteElo "2868"] [BlackElo "2783"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "118"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. e4 {0} c5 {0} 2. Nf3 {0} d6 {0} 3. Bb5+ {0} Nd7 {0} 4. d4 {0} cxd4 {0} 5. Qxd4 {9} a6 {3} 6. Bxd7+ {38} Bxd7 {7} 7. c4 {58} e5 {93} 8. Qd3 {9} b5 {45} 9. Nc3 {436} bxc4 {416} 10. Qxc4 {12} Be6 {49} 11. Qd3 {1485} h6 {132} 12. O-O {6} Nf6 {7} 13. Rd1 {7} Be7 {51} 14. Ne1 {42} O-O {90} 15. Nc2 {95} Qb6 {217} 16. Ne3 {180} Rfc8 {261} 17. b3 {267} a5 {323} 18. Bd2 {327} Qa6 {783} 19. Be1 {88} Nd7 {172} 20. f3 {388} Rc6 {437} 21. Qxa6 {41} Rcxa6 {88} 22. Ned5 {617} Bd8 { 33} 23. Nb5 {33} Rc8 {371} 24. Bf2 {443} Kh7 {464} 25. Kf1 {219} Rcc6 {255} 26. Rac1 {161} Bg5 {192} 27. Rc3 {76} Bxd5 {262} 28. Rxd5 {25} Rxc3 {75} 29. Nxc3 { 2} Rc6 {80} 30. Be1 {23} Nc5 {32} 31. Nb5 {887} Nb7 {169} 32. h4 {285} Be3 {43} 33. Ke2 {30} Bc5 {13} 34. h5 {174} Bb4 {113} 35. Bd2 {66} g6 {146} 36. a3 {173} Bxd2 {7} 37. hxg6+ {5} Kxg6 {6} 38. Kxd2 {6} h5 {16} 39. g3 {65} f6 {228} 40. Na7 {53} Rc7 {290} 41. Nb5 {3061} Rc6 {2985} 42. Ke2 {0} Kf7 {0} 43. b4 {0} axb4 {0} 44. axb4 {0} Ke6 {0} 45. Rd3 {0} Rc4 {0} 46. Rb3 {0} d5 {0} 47. Kd3 {0 } Rc6 {0} 48. exd5+ {0} Kxd5 {0} 49. Rc3 {0} f5 {0} 50. Nc7+ {0} Kd6 {0} 51. Ne8+ {0} Kd5 {0} 52. Rxc6 {0} Kxc6 {0} 53. Ng7 {0} Nd6 {0} 54. Nxh5 {0} e4+ {0} 55. fxe4 {0} Nxe4 {0} 56. Kd4 {0} Kb5 {0} 57. g4 {0} fxg4 {0} 58. Kxe4 {0} g3 { 0} 59. Nxg3 {0} Kxb4 {0} 1/2-1/2 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.09"] [Round "2"] [White "Aronian, Levon"] [Black "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D10"] [WhiteElo "2813"] [BlackElo "2775"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "139"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. d4 {0} d5 {0} 2. c4 {0} c6 {0} 3. cxd5 {0} cxd5 {0} 4. Bf4 {0} Nc6 {34} 5. e3 {23} Nf6 {26} 6. Nc3 {7} Bg4 {24} 7. Qb3 {6} Na5 {34} 8. Qa4+ {6} Bd7 {5} 9. Bb5 {4} Nc6 {22} 10. Qd1 {62} a6 {160} 11. Bd3 {54} Bg4 {1053} 12. Nge2 {123} e6 {6} 13. O-O {6} Be7 {9} 14. Rc1 {14} O-O {165} 15. Na4 {30} Rc8 {87} 16. f3 {327} Bh5 {31} 17. Nc5 {93} Bxc5 {772} 18. dxc5 {15} e5 {2} 19. Bg5 {15} h6 {1} 20. Bxf6 {122} Qxf6 {112} 21. Ng3 {19} Qg5 {128} 22. Qd2 {1988} d4 {68} 23. Qe1 {157} dxe3 {546} 24. Ne4 {38} Qe7 {4} 25. Nd6 {234} Rc7 {46} 26. Qxe3 {79} Bg6 {4} 27. Bxg6 {110} fxg6 {14} 28. Rfe1 {282} Qe6 {94} 29. a3 {144} g5 {8} 30. Rc4 {25} Qd5 {697} 31. Qe4 {202} Qxe4 {689} 32. Rcxe4 {128} Rd8 {6} 33. R1e3 { 106} Kh7 {450} 34. Kf2 {109} a5 {99} 35. Rc3 {324} Ra8 {99} 36. Ke3 {168} Ra6 { 746} 37. Nc4 {253} Ne7 {342} 38. Nb6 {16} a4 {1} 39. Kd2 {493} Ra5 {16} 40. Nxa4 {208} Nd5 {81} 41. Rc2 {3212} Nf4 {3315} 42. Kc1 {334} Rc6 {0} 43. Kb1 {0} g4 {0} 44. fxg4 {0} Nd3 {0} 45. Re3 {0} Nf4 {0} 46. b3 {0} Re6 {0} 47. Kb2 {0} Nd5 {0} 48. Re4 {0} Nf6 {0} 49. Rec4 {0} e4 {0} 50. Nb6 {0} Nxg4 {0} 51. b4 {0} Ra6 {0} 52. Re2 {0} Nxh2 {0} 53. Rcxe4 {0} Rg6 {0} 54. Re7 {0} Ra7 {0} 55. a4 { 0} Nf1 {0} 56. b5 {0} Ng3 {0} 57. Rf2 {0} Rg5 {0} 58. c6 {0} Rxa4 {0} 59. Nxa4 {0} Rxb5+ {0} 60. Kc2 {0} bxc6 {0} 61. Nc3 {0} Ra5 {0} 62. Rff7 {0} Nf5 {0} 63. Ra7 {0} Re5 {0} 64. g4 {0} Nd4+ {0} 65. Kd2 {0} Ne6 {23} 66. Rf5 {0} Nd4 {20} 67. Rxe5 {0} Nf3+ {2} 68. Ke3 {0} Nxe5 {2} 69. Kf4 {0} Ng6+ {2} 70. Ke4 {0} 1-0 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.09"] [Round "2"] [White "Topalov, Veselin"] [Black "Radjabov, Teimour"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B30"] [WhiteElo "2793"] [BlackElo "2745"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "80"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. e4 {0} c5 {0} 2. Nf3 {0} Nc6 {0} 3. Bb5 {20} e6 {0} 4. O-O {14} Nge7 {5} 5. Re1 {20} a6 {25} 6. Bf1 {8} d5 {50} 7. exd5 {12} Nxd5 {4} 8. d4 {25} Nf6 {96} 9. Be3 {9} cxd4 {174} 10. Nxd4 {53} Ne5 {13} 11. h3 {393} Be7 {156} 12. c4 {104 } Ng6 {116} 13. Nc3 {129} Qc7 {16} 14. Na4 {1056} Bd7 {654} 15. Qb3 {406} O-O { 132} 16. Qb6 {727} Qe5 {1665} 17. Bd2 {1211} Ne4 {642} 18. Nc3 {510} Qc5 {518} 19. Qxc5 {8} Nxc5 {3} 20. b3 {153} Rac8 {72} 21. Be3 {74} Rfd8 {284} 22. Red1 { 210} Be8 {168} 23. g3 {123} Ne5 {425} 24. Bg2 {71} Nc6 {431} 25. Nxc6 {281} Bxc6 {32} 26. Bxc6 {113} bxc6 {34} 27. f4 {95} Kf8 {229} 28. Kf2 {52} Ke8 {27} 29. Ke2 {12} Rb8 {138} 30. g4 {86} f5 {178} 31. Rac1 {135} g6 {147} 32. Rd4 { 173} Rxd4 {76} 33. Bxd4 {6} Rd8 {108} 34. Rd1 {11} Nd7 {212} 35. Na4 {59} Bd6 { 34} 36. gxf5 {185} exf5 {24} 37. Kf3 {19} Be7 {57} 38. Nb2 {121} Nf8 {64} 39. Be3 {112} Rxd1 {27} 40. Nxd1 {4} Ne6 {51 Ke4} 1/2-1/2 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.09"] [Round "2"] [White "Wang, Hao"] [Black "Svidler, Peter"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D70"] [WhiteElo "2743"] [BlackElo "2769"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "125"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {0} g6 {0} 3. f3 {0} d5 {363} 4. cxd5 {0} Nxd5 {4} 5. e4 {0} Nb6 {4} 6. Nc3 {0} Bg7 {6} 7. Be3 {1} O-O {72} 8. Qd2 {4} Nc6 {17} 9. O-O-O {7} Qd6 {2} 10. Nb5 {20} Qd7 {137} 11. f4 {21} Qe6 {227} 12. Nc3 {8} Nc4 {67} 13. Qe2 {7} Nxe3 {6} 14. Qxe3 {4} Nb4 {612} 15. Kb1 {826} Rd8 {535} 16. Nf3 {540} b5 {324} 17. a3 {1090} Na6 {1198} 18. Bxb5 {311} Qb6 {351} 19. Ne5 { 315} Bxe5 {88} 20. fxe5 {26} Rb8 {2} 21. Rd2 {393} Qa5 {747} 22. Bxa6 {184} Bxa6 {60} 23. Nd5 {22} Rb3 {306} 24. Nxe7+ {447} Kf8 {10} 25. Qxb3 {47} Qxd2 {3 } 26. Nc6 {9} Qxg2 {29} 27. Re1 {173} Re8 {68} 28. Qc2 {658} Qxc2+ {238} 29. Kxc2 {61} Bb5 {1} 30. Nxa7 {693} Bd7 {36} 31. Rf1 {21} f5 {442} 32. exf5 {158} gxf5 {12} 33. Kc3 {190} Ra8 {90} 34. e6 {91} Bxe6 {2} 35. Nc6 {116} Kg7 {24} 36. d5 {111} Bxd5 {92} 37. Nd4 {71} Be4 {112} 38. Nxf5+ {24} Kg6 {2} 39. Nd4 { 66} Ra5 {29} 40. Ne6 {294} Bf5 {98} 41. Nd4 {217} Bd7 {0} 42. Rf2 {91} h5 {249} 43. Kd3 {347} Rg5 {254} 44. Nf3 {181} Ra5 {2} 45. Kd4 {108} Ra4+ {45} 46. Ke3 { 0} Bf5 {0} 47. Nd4 {0} Bd7 {27} 48. Rc2 {0} Ra7 {0} 49. h4 {85} Kf6 {0} 50. Rc5 {30} Be8 {46} 51. Rf5+ {371} Ke7 {68} 52. Re5+ {51} Kd7 {8} 53. Nb3 {80} Bf7 {1 } 54. Nc5+ {151} Kd6 {0} 55. Kd4 {23} Ra8 {0} 56. Rf5 {191} Ke7 {0} 57. a4 {53} Rg8 {0} 58. Rf4 {98} Rg2 {109} 59. b4 {18} Rd2+ {271} 60. Kc3 {85} Ra2 {3} 61. a5 {999} Ra1 {1035} 62. a6 {738} Be8 {124} 63. Re4+ {41} 1-0 [Event "Norway Chess 2013"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2013.05.09"] [Round "2"] [White "Hammer, Jon Ludvig"] [Black "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E15"] [WhiteElo "2608"] [BlackElo "2767"] [Annotator ""] [PlyCount "108"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000:900+30"] 1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {0} e6 {0} 3. Nf3 {0} b6 {12} 4. g3 {6} Ba6 {6} 5. b3 { 11} Bb4+ {7} 6. Bd2 {14} Be7 {7} 7. Nc3 {47} O-O {29} 8. Bg2 {28} c6 {207} 9. e4 {34} d5 {15} 10. exd5 {47} cxd5 {6} 11. Ne5 {41} Bb7 {23} 12. O-O {53} Nc6 { 7} 13. Bf4 {51} Na5 {19} 14. Rc1 {111} Ba3 {41} 15. Rb1 {106} Bb4 {27} 16. Na4 {111} Ne4 {163} 17. a3 {1010} Be7 {214} 18. Qd3 {572} f6 {1219} 19. Ng4 {612} Re8 {1707} 20. cxd5 {161} exd5 {57} 21. f3 {1181} Nd6 {18} 22. Rfc1 {125} Bf8 { 518} 23. Ne3 {479} Nf7 {346} 24. b4 {308} Nc6 {12} 25. b5 {194} Nce5 {370} 26. dxe5 {302} fxe5 {12} 27. Bxe5 {21} Nxe5 {11} 28. Qd4 {10} Qf6 {590} 29. Kh1 {5} Nd7 {208} 30. Qd3 {286} Nc5 {248} 31. Nxc5 {26} Bxc5 {7} 32. Nxd5 {105} Qf7 {15 } 33. Nb4 {415} Re3 {276} 34. Qd2 {71} Rae8 {133} 35. Re1 {166} Bxf3 {203} 36. Rxe3 {9} Bxe3 {5} 37. Qd3 {179} Bxg2+ {31} 38. Kxg2 {4} Bc5 {10} 39. Rf1 {210} Qe6 {6} 40. Nc6 {53} a5 {305} 41. a4 {727} Qe2+ {370} 42. Qxe2 {0} Rxe2+ {0} 43. Kh3 {0} Re4 {106} 44. Rf5 {396} Rc4 {387} 45. Rd5 {58} Kf7 {28} 46. Rh5 { 1157} Rxa4 {110} 47. Rxh7 {0} Re4 {364} 48. Rh8 {56} a4 {8} 49. Ra8 {0} a3 {0} 50. Nd8+ {0} Kf6 {8} 51. Nb7 {0} Be7 {0} 52. Ra6 {0} Ke5 {11} 53. Kg2 {0} Rb4 { 10} 54. Rxb6 {0} Ra4 {9} 0-1

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Playchess commentary schedule

Date Round English German
May 10 Round 3 Daniel King Oliver Reeh
May 11 Free
May 12 Round 4 Chris Ward Klaus Bischoff
May 13 Round 5 Chris Ward Klaus Bischoff
May 14 Round 6 Daniel King Klaus Bischoff
May 15 Round 7 Oliver Reeh Klaus Bischoff
May 16 Free
May 17 Round 8 Daniel King Oliver Reeh
May 18 Round 9 Maurice Ashley Klaus Bischoff

Pairings and results of Norway Chess 2013

Round 1: Wednesday May 8, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Veselin Topalov
Viswanathan Anand
½-½
Levon Aronian
Hikaru Nakamura
1-0
Wang Hao
Peter Svidler
1-0
Jon Ludvig Hammer
Sergey Karjakin
1-0
Teimour Radjabov
Round 2: Thursday, May 9, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen
½-½
Viswanathan Anand
Veselin Topalov
½-½
Teimour Radjabov
Levon Aronian
1-0
Hikaru Nakamura
Wang Hao
1-0
Peter Svidler
Jon Ludvig Hammer
0-1
Sergey Karjakin
Round 3: Friday, May 10, 2013 in Sandnes
Viswanathan Anand Veselin Topalov
Hikaru Nakamura Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov Jon Ludvig Hammer
Sergey Karjakin Wang Hao
Round 4: Sunday, May 12, 2013 in Bryne
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler
Veselin Topalov Jon Ludvig Hammer
Viswanathan Anand Hikaru Nakamura
Levon Aronian Sergey Karjakin
Wang Hao Teimourgh Radjabov
Round 5: Monday, May 13, 2013 in Sandnes
Hikaru Nakamura Veselin Topalov
Jon Ludvig Hammer Wang Hao
Peter Svidler Viswanathan Anand
Teimour Radjabov Levon Aronian
Sergey Karjakin Magnus Carlsen
Round 6: Tuesday, May 14, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen Teimour Radjabov
Veselin Topalov Wang Hao
Viswanathan Anand Sergey Karjakin
Levon Aronian Jon Ludvig Hammer
Hikaru Nakamura Peter Svidler
Round 7: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 in Sør Hidle
Wang Hao Levon Aronian
Jon Ludvig Hammer Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler Veselin Topalov
Teimour Radjabov Viswanathan Anand
Sergey Karjakin Hikaru Nakamura
Round 8: Friday, May 17, 2013 in Sandnes
Magnus Carlsen Wang Hao
Veselin Topalov Levon Aronian
Viswanathan Anand Jon Ludvig Hammer
Hikaru Nakamura Teimour Radjabov
Peter Svidler Sergey Karjakin
Round 9: Saturday, May 18, 2013 in Stavanger
Levon Aronian Magnus Carlsen
Wang Hao Viswanathan Anand
Jon Ludvig Hammer Hikaru Nakamura
Teimour Radjabov Peter Svidler
Sergey Karjakin Veselin Topalov

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


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