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Norway 2013 Blitz won by Sergey Karjakin

5/7/2013 – The pairings of the Norway 2013 tournament were decided by a round-robin blitz tournament with more than just prestige on the line. The top five players would be the beneficiaries of five whites instead of five blacks, which is a distinct advantage. It was a fun exciting event with more than a few surprises, from blunders to a queen sac by Magnus Carlsen.
 

The Norway Chess 2013 Super Tournament will be one of the strongest super tournaments ever and will be held from May 7th to 18th 2013 in several different locations in the Stavanger-region of Norway:


Click to explore on Google Maps

By using a variety of historical locations the organisers wish to get maximum attention for the Stavanger region, which has already expressed an interest in repeating the tournament in the district.

Blitz tournament

The elite Norway Chess tournament is the last event on the calendar which will bring together Magnus Carlsen and Vishy Anand before their title clash, and for this reason alone promises to be an event not to be missed. Still, to focus solely on the two would be remiss of the prestigious company they are in, including Levon Aronian, Sergey Karjakin, Veselin Topalov, Hikaru Nakamura, Peter Svidler (replacing Vladimir Kramnik), Teimour Radjabov, Wang Hao, and Jon Hammer.

With the world number one on his home turf, the media was in ecstasy

The pairings were decided by a round-robin blitz tournament, played at three minutes plus two seconds increment, with more than just prize money or prestige on the line. With nine rounds, it means that the number of whites and blacks will inevitably be uneven, and the top five players would be the beneficiaries of five whites instead of five blacks.

Although more a sporting question than a pressing one, the blitz tournament does permit the players to exercise some psychological warfare over their opponents the day before the real event starts.

For viewers, it was also a way to see what organizers had in store for them technologically, and it did not disappoint. The live games page not only includes the respective games, but live grandmaster commentary, on-the-fly engine analysis by Houdini 3, and no fewer than eight cameras to choose from. The eight cameras, chosen in a drop-down menu, allow the viewer to choose between specific boards, the commentators, and even a general overview.

The website is a model of how a top tournament can be presented online

Live streaming commentary for viewers

It is worth noting that Playchess will provide interactive commentary (i.e. ask the grandmasters questions) every day for Premium subscribers (a mere 17 Euros per year over the Basic subscription), not to mention the ability to watch all the boards at once, see the live book, and chat with others about the games in progress.

Playchess commentary schedule

Date
Round
English
German
May 08
Round 1
Lawrence Trent
Klaus Bischoff
May 09
Round 2
Lawrence Trent
Klaus Bischoff
May 10
Round 3
Daniel King
Oliver Reeh
May 11
Free
May 12
Round 4
Chris Ward
Klaus Bischoff
May 13
Round 5
Chris Ward
Klaus Bischoff
May 14
Round 6
Daniel King
Klaus Bischoff
May 15
Round 7
Oliver Reeh
Klaus Bischoff
May 16
Free
May 17
Round 8
Daniel King
Oliver Reeh
May 18
Round 9
Maurice Ashley
Klaus Bischoff

The blitz tournament was a fun, albeit strange affair regarding the results. Teimour Radjabov seemed poised to run away with the event after an impeccable 4.0/4 start, but by round nine was on a meager 4.5/8, and sixth place. To break into the top five, he not only needed to win, but benefit from a slip from one of the higher-placed rivals. No such luck however.

Another surprising result was the absolute disaster by Veselin Topalov, fresh from his fantastic victory at Zug, who only managed to scrounge up 1.0/9 by the end. The top five were a photo finish with all the players taking the lead at different times. Anand’s fans will be glad to see that the world champion seemed to have eaten tiger today, Bengal tiger, and was in the lead several times and seemed to be in good form.

While Topalov seemed unable to get into gear for the blitz, Anand came in great form

The last round encounter between Magnus Carlsen and sole leader Peter Svidler was crucial, and once again the two met for a decisive final fight. With six at the top, there was a distinct risk the world number one might not break into that group, but it was a last-minute blunder by Svidler that ensured his spot. In the end, Sergey Karjakin pipped the others by half a point with 6.5/9.

A spectacular queen sac by Magnus Carlsen:

[Event "Supreme Masters Blitz 2013"] [Site "Stavanger NOR"] [Date "2013.05.07"] [Round "4.2"] [White "Hammer, Jon Ludvig"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E15"] [WhiteElo "2608"] [BlackElo "2868"] [PlyCount "80"] [EventDate "2013.05.07"] [EventType "tourn (blitz)"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "NOR"] [EventCategory "21"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Bb7 5. Bg2 g6 6. O-O Bg7 7. Nc3 Ne4 8. Nxe4 Bxe4 9. Bg5 Qc8 10. Qd2 h6 11. Bf4 d6 12. Rac1 Nd7 13. Rfe1 Qb7 14. b3 g5 15. Be3 f5 16. Red1 O-O 17. Bf1 Rae8 18. Ne1 e5 19. dxe5 Nxe5 20. f3 Bc6 21. Bd4 f4 22. gxf4 Rxf4 23. Be3 Rf7 24. Bf2 Qc8 25. Bg3 Qf5 26. Nc2 {One of the fun things about blitz is that combinations the grandmasters would easily sidestep in classical chess take place over the board.} Qxf3 $3 {Got to love a queen sac for a pawn.} 27. exf3 Nxf3+ 28. Kh1 Nxd2+ 29. Bg2 Bxg2+ 30. Kxg2 Re2+ 31. Kh1 Nf3 32. Nb4 a5 33. Rc2 Rfe7 34. Nd5 Rxc2 35. Nxe7+ Kf7 36. Nd5 h5 37. Rf1 g4 38. Nxc7 Be5 39. Rf2 Rc1+ 40. Kg2 Rg1# 0-1

It was another last-round clash between Magnus Carlsen and Peter Svidler

Though many came close, Sergey Karjakin was the sole winner

Final standings

(Tiebreak for places 2-4: Carlsen on most games with black pieces, Anand with two victories with black, and Nakamura one victory with black)

Pairings of Norway Chess 2013

Round 1 (May 8, 2013)
Magnus Carlsen Veselin Topalov
Viswanathan Anand Levon Aronian
Hikaru Nakamura Wang Hao
Peter Svidler Jon Ludvig Hammer
Sergey Karjakin Teimour Radjabov
Round 2 (May 9, 2013)
Magnus Carlsen Viswanathan Anand
Veselin Topalov Teimour Radjabov
Levon Aronian Hikaru Nakamura
Wang Hao Peter Svidler
Jon Ludvig Hammer Sergey Karjakin
Round 3 (May 10, 2013)
Viswanathan Anand Veselin Topalov
Hikaru Nakamura Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov Jon Ludvig Hammer
Sergey Karjakin Wang Hao
Round 4 (May 12, 2013)
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler
Veselin Topalov Jon Ludvig Hammer
Viswanathan Anand Hikaru Nakamura
Levon Aronian Sergey Karjakin
Wang Hao Teimour Radjabov
Round 5 (May 13, 2013)
Hikaru Nakamura Veselin Topalov
Jon Ludvig Hammer Wang Hao
Peter Svidler Viswanathan Anand
Teimour Radjabov Levon Aronian
Sergey Karjakin Magnus Carlsen
Round 6 (May 14, 2013)
Magnus Carlsen Teimour Radjabov
Veselin Topalov Wang Hao
Viswanathan Anand Sergey Karjakin
Levon Aronian Jon Ludvig Hammer
Hikaru Nakamura Peter Svidler
Round 7 (May 15, 2013)
Wang Hao Levon Aronian
Jon Ludvig Hammer Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler Veselin Topalov
Teimour Radjabov Viswanathan Anand
Sergey Karjakin Hikaru Nakamura
Round 8 (May 17, 2013)
Magnus Carlsen Wang Hao
Veselin Topalov Levon Aronian
Viswanathan Anand Jon Ludvig Hammer
Hikaru Nakamura Teimour Radjabov
Peter Svidler Sergey Karjakin
Round 9 (May 18, 2013)
Levon Aronian Magnus Carlsen
Wang Hao Viswanathan Anand
Jon Ludvig Hammer Hikaru Nakamura
Teimour Radjabov Peter Svidler
Sergey Karjakin Veselin Topalov

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.

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