Mind Games Day 6: Basque System starts

by Alejandro Ramirez
12/17/2013 – This unique style of chess has begun in China! The players face each other twice simultaneously, once with black and once with white. In the men's Karjakin has again taken an early lead with a devastating 5.0/6. In the women's it is the Chinese that are dominating as they hold the top three spots at the moment, with Hou Yifan and Ju Wenjun at the very top. Analysis of the basque!

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!


Along with the ChessBase 14 program you can access the Live Database of 8 million games, and receive three months of free ChesssBase Account Premium membership and all of our online apps! Have a look today!

More...

SportAccord Mind Games will be held in Beijing, China between the 12th of December and 20th December 2012. The World Mind Games was held for the first time in 2008 and consisted of 5 disciplines: chess, bridge, draughts (checkers), go, and xiangqi (Chinese chess). SportAccord, the organizer of the Mind Games, is the umbrella organization for both Olympic and non-Olympic sports as well as for major organizers of conferences and sporting events.

Day 6: Basque Rapids - Men

After one board is finished or the position is not very interesting players tend to concentrate on the other one

Redifining "opening moves"

The basque rapids have started in China. To clarify, this means that each player plays against his opponent on two boards simultaneously, one with white and one with black.

Karjakin continues dominant in China with excellent results in all the formats. He has so far scored a superb 5.0/6 in three rounds in the Basque system, besting Leko 2-0, Aronian 1.5-0.5 and Ponomariov 1.5-0.5. This gives him a full point lead after the first day of the Basque and he will try to defend his first place position tomorrow when the chess events finish.

Dividing attention is not easy! Ivanchuk currently has 50% and holds the sixth place thanks to tiebreaks

Ponomariov and Le Quang Liem are both in striking distance from Karjakin, while fourth place is being shared by Grischuk and Aronian at 3.5/6.

Let's look at how one board can affect the other.

[Event "Basque"] [Site "Beijing"] [Date "2013.12.17"] [Round "1.13"] [White "Leko Peter (HUN)"] [Black "Karjakin Sergey (RUS)"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A04"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez, Alejandro"] [PlyCount "118"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] 1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 e5 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. O-O d6 7. a3 Nge7 8. Rb1 a5 9. Ne1 Be6 10. Nd5 Rb8 11. d3 O-O 12. Bg5 f6 13. Bd2 b5 14. Nxe7+ Nxe7 15. cxb5 Rxb5 16. b4 cxb4 17. axb4 axb4 18. Rxb4 Rxb4 19. Bxb4 Qb6 20. Qd2 Nd5 21. Ba5 Qa7 22. Nc2 Rc8 23. Na3 Bh6 24. Nb5 Bxd2 25. Nxa7 Rc2 26. Bxd2 Rxd2 27. Nb5 Ne7 28. Bf3 d5 29. Rc1 Bh3 30. Nc3 Kg7 31. Rd1 Rxd1+ 32. Nxd1 d4 33. Bg2 Bg4 34. Kf1 Kf7 35. Ke1 Bd7 36. e3 Ke6 37. exd4 exd4 38. Nb2 Kd6 39. Nc4+ Kc5 40. Kd2 Be6 41. Na5 Kb6 {At this moment the players have reached the 29th move in the other game. Leko has a difficult position here as his knight doesn't have a lot of good choices.} 42. Nc4+ (42. Nb7 $1 {Hodls the draw as the knight cannot actually be caught.} Nf5 43. Nd8 Bd7 44. Bd5 $11) 42... Bxc4 43. dxc4 Kc5 {Now the weakness of c4 is tangible and the knight is far superior to the bishop, which has no targets.} 44. Kd3 g5 {With the knight jump to e5 coming it is impossible to protect the pawn. White must resort to finding some resource.} 45. Be4 $6 (45. Bf1 $1 {Can someone be blamed for not finding this move in a rapid game, let alone one in which you are sharing the attention with another rapid game?!} Ng6 46. Ke4 Ne5 47. h4 $1 gxh4 48. gxh4 Nxc4 49. Kf5 {and the game will surely end in a draw.}) 45... f5 46. Bb7 Ng6 47. Bc8 Ne5+ 48. Ke2 $2 {The decisive mistake.} (48. Kd2 f4 (48... Nxc4+ 49. Ke2 f4 50. gxf4 gxf4 51. Kd3 {is similar.}) 49. gxf4 gxf4 50. h3 Kxc4 51. Be6+ Kc5 52. Bg8 { and making progress is not trivial.}) 48... f4 (48... d3+ $1 {was even more accurate.} 49. Ke3 f4+ $1) 49. gxf4 gxf4 50. Be6 d3+ 51. Kd2 Kd4 {Now White is completely lost, he has no good answer against Nf3+} 52. c5 (52. h3 Nxc4+ $19) 52... Nf3+ (52... Kxc5 $2 53. Kc3 {is not the way to go.}) 53. Kd1 Kxc5 54. Bf5 Kd4 55. Bxh7 Nxh2 56. Bf5 Nf3 57. Bg4 Ng5 58. Bf5 Ne4 59. f3 Nd6 {the win from now on is very simple, so Leko resigned. Let's see what was happening in the other game in the meantime.} 0-1

 

[Event "Basque"] [Site "Beijing"] [Date "2013.12.17"] [Round "1.14"] [White "Karjakin Sergey (RUS)"] [Black "Leko Peter (HUN)"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A46"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "133"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. Bf4 c5 4. e3 b6 5. Nbd2 Bb7 6. Bd3 Be7 7. h3 O-O 8. c3 cxd4 9. exd4 d6 10. O-O Nbd7 11. Re1 Qc7 12. c4 Rfe8 13. Rc1 Rac8 14. Nb1 Bf8 15. Bh2 Qb8 16. Nc3 a6 17. b4 Qa8 18. a3 g6 19. Bf1 Nh5 20. Nd2 Ndf6 21. Qe2 e5 22. dxe5 dxe5 23. Qe3 Re6 24. Rcd1 a5 25. Rb1 axb4 26. axb4 Rce8 27. Nde4 Nxe4 28. Nxe4 Nf4 29. c5 {This is the position in which Leko started to go wrong in the other game. Time pressure, and the pressure of finding himself in a lost position in the other board, started to take its toll on this one.} bxc5 30. Ra1 Qc8 31. Nxc5 Bxc5 32. bxc5 Qc6 33. f3 {White has comfortably improved his position and holds a nice edge. Things just go downhill for Leko from now.} Nd5 34. Qf2 Nf4 35. Rab1 Qc7 36. Bxf4 exf4 37. Rxe6 Rxe6 38. Qd4 Re8 39. Rb6 Bc6 40. Bc4 {With completely board control and a nice passed pawn, it seems that Karjakin has everything under control. And yet here Leko has a surprising resource that would have changed the game.} Rc8 (40... Rd8 $1 {Would Leko have found this in a classical game? in a normal rapid? only speculation can answer that.} 41. Qf6 (41. Rxc6 Rxd4 42. Rxc7 Rxc4 {is an easy draw.}) (41. Bxf7+ Kxf7 42. Rxc6 Qxc6 $1 43. Qxd8 Qxc5+ {is also an easy draw.}) (41. Qc3 Bxf3 $1 {is the point.} 42. Bxf7+ {otherwise Qc5+ is too strong.} Qxf7 43. Qxf3 $11) 41... Bd5 $1 {is no good for White.}) 41. Ba6 {Now Black is helpless.} Re8 42. Kh2 Ra8 43. Qb4 (43. h4 {was more direct, with the intention of Qd6 at some point.} ) 43... Be8 44. Rd6 Rb8 45. Qd4 Ra8 46. Qe5 Qa7 47. Rb6 Qd7 48. c6 Qa7 49. Qc5 Qc7 50. Bc4 Rc8 51. Bd5 Qd8 52. Be4 Qh4 53. Rb1 Qd8 54. Ra1 Qf6 55. Rd1 Rc7 56. Qb6 Qe7 57. Ra1 Rc8 58. Qa6 Rc7 59. Rb1 Qg5 60. Qa8 Kf8 61. Kh1 Qh4 62. Qa1 Kg8 63. Qe5 Rc8 64. Qd6 Qf2 65. c7 Qe2 66. Kh2 Qc4 67. Rb8 {Many inaccuracies in this game, but finally Karjakin wins a piece and Leko resigns again.} 1-0

Wang Yue and Kamsky ready to begin their games

Yes, they are playing against each other, even though it doesn't look like it

Rank Name Rtg FED   1.Rd.   2.Rd.   3.Rd. Pts
1 Karjakin Sergey 2787 RUS   16 1 1   4 ½​ 1   2 1 ½​ 5.0
2 Ponomariov Ruslan 2748 UKR   15 1 ½​   9 1 1   1 0 ½​ 4.0
  Le Quang Liem 2756 VIE   7 0 1   6 ½​ 1   10 ½​ 1 4.0
4 Aronian Levon 2797 ARM   14 1 1   1 ½​ 0   5 ½​ ½​ 3.5
5 Grischuk Alexander 2828 RUS   10 0 ½​   13 1 1   4 ½​ ½​ 3.5
6 Ivanchuk Vassily 2732 UKR   8 0 1   3 ½​ 0   15 ½​ 1 3.0
7 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2795 AZE   3 1 0   12 ½​ ½​   8 1 0 3.0
8 Nepomniachtchi Ian 2799 RUS   6 1 0   10 ½​ ½​   7 0 1 3.0
9 Kamsky Gata 2734 USA   11 ½​ 1   2 0 0   14 ½​ 1 3.0
10 Dominguez Perez Leinier 2758 CUB   5 1 ½​   8 ½​ ½​   3 ½​ 0 3.0
11 Wang Yue 2729 CHN   9 ½​ 0   15 ½​ 1   12 ½​ ½​ 3.0
12 Radjabov Teimour 2749 AZE   13 0 1   7 ½​ ½​   11 ½​ ½​ 3.0
13 Wang Hao 2690 CHN   12 1 0   5 0 0   16 1 ½​ 2.5
14 Giri Anish 2700 NED   4 0 0   16 ½​ 1   9 ½​ 0 2.0
15 Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2761 FRA   2 0 ½​   11 ½​ 0   6 ½​ 0 1.5
16 Leko Peter 2738 HUN   1 0 0   14 ½​ 0   13 0 ½​ 1.0

Note: Rapid ratings used

Tomorrow Karjakin will start against Le Quang Liem while Aronian will play Ponomariov. However anyone that currently has 3.0/6 has real chances at making the podium wiht a good result tomorrow.

Men Basque Games games one to three

Day 6: Basque Women

Kosintseva and Zhao Xue race to start their opponent's clock. Time is of the essence!

Hou Yifan exhibited aggressive and strong chess in the day one of the Basque. She started out crushing Antoeneta Stefanova on both boards in round one:

[Event "Basque"] [Site "Beijing"] [Date "2013.12.17"] [Round "1.2"] [White "Hou Yifan (CHN)"] [Black "Stefanova Antoaneta (BUL)"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C50"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "71"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. O-O Nf6 5. d3 O-O 6. h3 d6 7. c3 Bb6 8. Bb3 h6 9. Nbd2 Ne7 10. Re1 c6 11. d4 Ng6 12. Nf1 Be6 13. Bc2 Re8 14. Ng3 Qd7 15. Be3 Rad8 16. a4 Bc7 17. a5 a6 18. Qc1 d5 {By this point in the other game Stefanov had misplayed the Catalan and found herself basically down a pawn. Hou Yifan smelled blood in this game too.} 19. Bxh6 $3 {An excellent sacrifice. } exd4 (19... gxh6 20. Qxh6 {threatening the simple Nh5 with unstoppable mate.} Qe7 21. dxe5 $1 Nh7 (21... Bxe5 22. Nxe5 Nxe5 23. Qg5+ Ng6 24. Nf5 Bxf5 25. exf5 {regains the piece and keeps an extra pawn for White.}) 22. Nf5 Qf8 23. Qh5 {and White has a strong initiative while retaining three pawns for a piece. }) 20. e5 $1 {A great follow up. Black is lost.} Ne4 (20... gxh6 21. Qxh6 { comes with simply too many threats.}) 21. Nh5 (21. Bxg7 Kxg7 22. Nh5+ {was more accurate as Black cannot go to g8 or h7 because of an eventual fork on f6 after destroying the knight on e4.}) 21... Bxh3 $1 {Fighting back! Stefanova is not out of it just yet, but Hou Yifan recovers and proceeds precisely.} 22. Bxe4 Qg4 (22... Bxg2 23. Kxg2 dxe4 24. Rxe4 Bxe5 25. Qg5 $1 {And White has the upper hand in every way.}) 23. Ng3 {With this neutralizing retreat White covers all the threats and emerges up material.} Nxe5 24. Nxe5 Rxe5 25. gxh3 Qxh3 26. Bf4 dxe4 27. cxd4 Rxd4 28. Bxe5 Bxe5 29. Ra3 {Black has some threats here and there, and might even get another pawn, but a rook is a rook.} Bd6 30. Rb3 Qg4 31. Qe3 c5 32. Qe2 Qh4 33. Rd1 f5 34. Rxd4 cxd4 35. Qc4+ Kh7 36. Qxd4 { A great start for the winner of the blitz.} 1-0

She proceeded to also beat Kosteniuk 2-0 with a sacrificial win on the White board and a positional win with Black. She was finally halted by her compatriot Zhao Xue who took a full point from her.

Ju Wenjun started with two draws against Ushenina. Also who said flexibility wasn't important in chess?

Tied with Hou Yifan is Ju Wenjun who started slowly with two draws against Ushenina, but proceeded to beat Koneru 2-0 and finished the day with another 2-0 with against Cmilyte. In third position is yet another Chinese, Zhao Xue has 4.5/6 points after beating Sebag, Ushenina and drawing Hou Yifan.

Roller chairs are an important weapon in this type of chess

From the "foreigners" Paehtz has the best result so far, helped by her great first round against Sebag in which she won both games.

Paehtz beat Sebag in both of the boards and she has a great result so far with 4.0/6

Maybe measuring the playing field helped?

It definitely helped Ju Wenjun who is tied for first. She will play Hou Yifan first thing in the morning.

Rank Name Rtg FED   1.Rd.   2.Rd.   3.Rd. Pts
1 Hou Yifan 2579 CHN   16 1 1   9 1 1   3 0 1 5.0
2 Ju Wenjun 2552 CHN   11 ½​ ½​   15 1 1   7 1 1 5.0
3 Zhao Xue 2489 CHN   12 1 ½​   11 1 1   1 1 0 4.5
4 Paehtz Elisabeth 2513 GER   14 1 1   7 0 1   5 0 1 4.0
5 Dzagnidze Nana 2575 GEO   8 1 0   10 1 ½​   4 1 0 3.5
6 Gunina Valentina 2543 RUS   9 ½​ 0   8 1 ½​   13 ½​ 1 3.5
7 Cmilyte Viktorija 2450 LTU   13 1 1   4 1 0   2 0 0 3.0
8 Muzychuk Anna 2566 SLO   5 0 1   6 0 ½​   9 1 0 2.5
9 Kosteniuk Alexandra 2588 RUS   6 ½​ 1   1 0 0   8 0 1 2.5
10 Cramling Pia 2513 SWE   15 ½​ ½​   5 0 ½​   12 1 0 2.5
11 Ushenina Anna 2478 UKR   2 ½​ ½​   3 0 0   16 1 ½​ 2.5
12 Kosintseva Tatiana 2503 RUS   3 0 ½​   16 ½​ ½​   10 0 1 2.5
13 Lagno Kateryna 2566 UKR   7 0 0   14 ½​ 1   6 ½​ 0 2.0
14 Sebag Marie 2502 FRA   4 0 0   13 ½​ 0   15 1 ½​ 2.0
15 Koneru Humpy 2626 IND   10 ½​ ½​   2 0 0   14 0 ½​ 1.5
16 Stefanova Antoaneta 2582 BUL   1 0 0   12 ½​ ½​   11 0 ½​ 1.5

Note: Rapid ratings used

Women Basque Games games one to three

Photos by Gu Xiaobing, taken from the official FIDE website

Schedule

Thursday, December 12th 14:00-19:00    Rapid Event: 1-4 rounds (men), 1-4 rounds (women)
Friday, December 13th 14:00-19:00    Rapid Event: 5-7 rounds (men), 5-7 rounds (women)
Saturday, December 14th 14:00-19:00    Blitz Event: 1-10 rounds (men), 1-10 rounds (women)
Sunday, December 15th 14:00-19:00    Blitz Event: 11-20 rounds (men), 11-20 rounds (women)
Monday, December 16th 14:00-19:00    Blitz Event: 21-30 rounds (men), 21-30 rounds (women)
Tuesday, December 17th 14:00-19:00    Basque System: 1-3 rounds (men), 1-3 rounds (women)
Wednesday, December 18th 11:00-16:00    Basque System: 4-5 rounds (men), 4-5 rounds (women) &
Closing Ceremony

Links

The games will be broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.



Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register