London Rd10: Nakamura beats Giri, Mamedyarov stays in the lead

10/2/2012 – Azeri GM Shakhriyar Mamedyarov took the lead yesterday for the first time, and kept it today after five out of six games were drawn. The top seed in the tournament, Hikaru Nakamura, who by his own tweet says he seems to do his absolute best to commit harakiri, won his game against Anish Giri after four losses in a row. Note: the final round games tomorrow start two hours early.

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The First FIDE Grand Prix is taking place from September 21 to October 3rd in Simpson’s-in-the-Strand, London. The games start at 14:00h local time (= 15:00h CEST, 17:00h Moscow, 09:00 a.m. New York). The tournament has a prize fund of 240,000 Euros.

Round ten report

Round 10 on 2012/10/02 at 14:00
Leko Peter 2737
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2738
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
1-0
Giri Anish 2730
Topalov Veselin 2752
½-½
Adams Michael 2722
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
½-½
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Wang Hao 2742
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov appeared very relaxed when he arrived at Simpson`s with his manager. Shakhriyar decided to play the Caro Kann Defence, his opening of choice for this tournament. Wang Hao prepared a surprise for his opponent, 5.Nc5, trying to defuse any preparation. “Shak” paused for thought, and then replied 5…e5!? which caught Wang Hao unprepared, as he had not expected Mamedyarov to know this variation deeply. The forced line that followed saw a quick exchange of queens which led to the endgame with a slightly better pawn structure for white. Hao-ever it was not enough and a draw was the result [pun in the official tournament report]

The main question was how Boris Gelfand (above right) would recover from yesterday's loss. Boris seemed in a good mood and was smiling before the game. Peter Leko went for a quiet line based on Nc3/Bc4 in the Closed Sicilian. Nothing much happened until move 20, after which some pieces were exchanged. White started to take the initiative by opening the f-file, and putting a strong bishop on d5. White started to control the black squares, and the knight on e3 defended the whole white pawn centre. Draw in 59 moves.

Almost all the players of the tournament want to avoid the Marshall Gambit. In this game there was no exception, as Rustam Kasimdzhanov (above left) chose the Exchange Variation of the Ruy Lopez. White decided to open the centre and found a very interesting plan, putting the queen on b1 in order to push c3/d4. Sasha Grischuk took a long time to play the first 15 moves and had just 14 minutes left for 22 moves. However, the two times world blitz champion is quite used to time trouble. Taking the initiative on the kingside and centre, Grischuk increased his advantage, pressuring the f2 pawn. Kasimdzhanov survived the attack when Grischuk offered the exchange of queens with 38…Qf3? The rook endgame, which appeared, was finally drawn. A disappointment for Grischuk, who could have won and taken the lead.

The only chance for Veselin Topalov (above left) to catch the leader was to win today with the white pieces against Michael Adams. We saw one of the first Queen’s Gambit of the tournament, which looked pretty safe for Black. Veselin managed to double Black’s pawns on the b-file and took a small advantage into the endgame. But it was not enough to provide a win, and the draw was agreed after fifty moves.

Vasily Ivanchuk (above right) was in a good mood before the start of the game, looking at the pictures of Staunton on the wall of the Simpson’s in the Strand. The famous Immortal Game was played in the same building between Adolf Anderssen and Lionel Kieseritzky on 21 June 1851. The Ukrainian player decided today to play a rare variation of the Ruy Lopez (4…d6). Leinier replied with a safe line, putting all his pieces in the centre and obtained a slight advantage, due to the doubled black pawns on c7 and c6. Ivanchuk managed to exchange queens and equalized by putting a strong bishop on e3. Draw in 40 moves.

Anish Giri (above right) did not not change his main weapon against 1.e4, and so the Petrov appeared once again on the board. Hikaru Nakamura exchanged queen after five moves and decided to play a long endgame. The white pieces had more space, but the black pieces found good placing. The bishop on b6 protected by the a5 pawn was controlling the queenside. Hikaru settled his other bishop on e6. The position of Anish was very solid, with the bishops on c6 and d6, but Hikaru managed to break through and finally won the game!

All photos by Ray Morris-Hill

All games of the round for replay

Game of the day analysis by GM Alejandro Ramirez

[Event "FIDE Grand Prix - London 2012"] [Site "London"] [Date "2012.10.02"] [Round "10"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C42"] [WhiteElo "2783"] [BlackElo "2730"] [Annotator "Ramirez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "129"] [EventDate "2012.??.??"] [EventCountry "ENG"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Qe2 Qe7 6. d3 Nf6 7. Nc3 Qxe2+ 8. Bxe2 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. h3 h6 {Nothing could be more dull than this variation Hikaru chose, but Giri starts going haywire pretty quickly. Maybe he was trying to capitalize on Hikaru's seemingly poor form? But then why choose a Petroff to begin with?} 11. Re1 Rd8 $6 {I have no clue what the rook is doing on d8.} 12. Nd4 Bf8 13. Bf3 c6 14. b4 Nbd7 15. g3 {A few inaccurate moves and it's obvious White's position is slightly more pleasant, but nothing out of the ordinary yet.} Nb6 16. Bg2 a5 17. bxa5 Rxa5 18. a4 {White's weak a-pawn is no weaker than Black's b-pawn, also the knight has no stability on b6.} Nbd7 19. Nb3 Ra6 20. a5 Nc5 21. Nxc5 dxc5 22. Ra4 Nd5 (22... c4 $1 $11) 23. Nxd5 cxd5 24. Bf4 Bd7 (24... Be6 25. Bc7 Rd7 26. Bb6 Ra8 $11) 25. Raa1 Bc6 26. Bc7 Rc8 27. Bb6 Bd6 28. h4 {With Black's clumsy rooks it seems that White is a little better. The bishop would've been better placed on e6 rather than c6, by the way.} Raa8 29. Bh3 Rcb8 30. c3 Kf8 31. h5 Re8 32. Bg2 Rxe1+ 33. Rxe1 Rc8 34. Rd1 Be7 35. f4 f6 36. Kf2 d4 $2 {This doesn't quite work, but in time pressure it might seem like it does.} 37. Bh3 (37. Bxc6 Rxc6 38. cxd4 cxd4 39. Rb1 $1 $16 {was probably missed by both players.} (39. Bxd4 $2 Bc5 $1 {leads to a relatively simple draw as the d-pawn will never be able to cause serious threats in the ensuing Rook endgame.}) 39... Bc5 (39... Rc2+ 40. Kf3 Bc5 41. Bc7 $1 {doesn't work either.}) 40. Rc1 {is the point.}) 37... Ra8 38. c4 Bd6 39. Re1 Re8 40. Be6 Re7 41. g4 Re8 42. f5 Re7 43. Re2 Re8 {Black is still super restricted but it's not easy how to break through.} 44. Rb2 Ra8 (44... Re7 45. Ba7 $1 Re8 46. Bd5 $16) 45. Rb1 Ke8 46. Re1 Be5 $2 {This move simply loses the game to a wonderful stroke. I am not 100% sure how Hikaru would've continued had Giri simply shuffled his king on the e-file, as White has no useful discoveries.} (46... Ke7 $1 {admittedly not very human, but then again I wouldn't have ever played the king to the e-file to start with with 45... Ke8 } 47. Bd5+ Kd7 $14) 47. g5 {For some reason computers take forever to find this move, but honestly it is not very hard to calculate. Black is so restricted it is obvious he will lose material.} hxg5 48. h6 gxh6 49. Rxe5 fxe5 50. f6 {The threat is Bxc5 and f7+, winning a full rook. Black's position is lost.} Bd7 51. f7+ Ke7 52. Bxd7 Kxd7 $2 (52... Kxf7 53. Bf5 h5 54. Be4 Rb8 { might be winning for White, but it at least put up some resistance. With the passed pawns on the kingside creating some counterplay it might have been possible to try something. The move in the game loses without any fun.}) 53. Bxc5 h5 54. f8=Q Rxf8+ 55. Bxf8 h4 56. Bh6 g4 57. Bg5 h3 58. Bh4 {The pawns are blocked, so it is good game and time to shake hands. I'm not sure what Giri was expecting from this endgame.} Kd6 59. Bg3 Ke6 60. Ke2 Kd6 61. Kd2 Kc5 (61... Ke6 62. Kc2 Kd6 63. Kb3 Ke6 64. Kb4 Kf5 65. Kc5 $18) 62. Bxe5 Kb4 63. Kc2 Kxa5 64. Kb3 Kb6 65. Bxd4+ {In a round robin, you can never underestimate 'the weak'. Hikaru scores a morally important victory against a Giri who just never really seemed to understand what he was aiming for.} 1-0


Video stream of the whole game


Commentary by Giri and Nakamura on the game, provided by Macauley Peterson

Daniel King: Play of the Day – Kasimdzhanov - Grischuk

Post mortem with Rustam Kasimdzhanov

Interview with Kasimdzhanov

Standings after ten rounds


Azeri GM Shakhriyar Mamedyarov still in the sole lead

With one round to go Topalov, Gelfand and Grischuk all share the 2nd place, half a point behind the leader Mamedyarov, who has white against Peter Leko in the final round. Both Grischuk and Gelfand also have white, against Nakamura and Kasimdzhanov repectively, while Topalov play with the black pieces against Anish Giri. Please remember: the last round starts at 12 noon British time.

Schedule and results

Round 1 on 2012/09/21 at 14:00
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
0-1
Gelfand Boris 2738
Topalov Veselin 2752
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
½-½
Giri Anish 2730
Wang Hao 2742
½-½
Adams Michael 2722
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
½-½
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Round 2 on 2012/09/22 at 14:00
Leko Peter 2737
1-0
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Adams Michael 2722
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
Giri Anish 2730
½-½
Wang Hao 2742
Grischuk Alexander 2754
½-½
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
Gelfand Boris 2738
½-½
Topalov Veselin 2752
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
0-1
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
Round 3 on 2012/09/23 at 14:00
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Topalov Veselin 2752
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2738
Wang Hao 2742
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
1-0
Giri Anish 2730
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
½-½
Adams Michael 2722
Round 4 on 2012/09/24 at 14:00
Leko Peter 2737
½-½
Adams Michael 2722
Giri Anish 2730
½-½
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Grischuk Alexander 2754
1-0
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
Gelfand Boris 2738
1-0
Wang Hao 2742
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
½-½
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
½-½
Topalov Veselin 2752
Round 5 on 2012/09/25 at 14:00
Topalov Veselin 2752
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
½-½
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
Wang Hao 2742
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2738
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Adams Michael 2722
½-½
Giri Anish 2730
Round 6 on 2012/09/27 at 14:00
Leko Peter 2737
½-½
Giri Anish 2730
Grischuk Alexander 2754
½-½
Adams Michael 2722
Gelfand Boris 2738
½-½
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
0-1
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
0-1
Wang Hao 2742
Topalov Veselin 2752
1-0
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
Round 7 on 2012/09/28 at 14:00
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Wang Hao 2742
½-½
Topalov Veselin 2752
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
1-0
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
Adams Michael 2722
0-1
Gelfand Boris 2738
Giri Anish 2730
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Round 8 on 2012/09/29 at 14:00
Leko Peter 2737
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Gelfand Boris 2738
½-½
Giri Anish 2730
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
1-0
Adams Michael 2722
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
0-1
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Topalov Veselin 2752
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
½-½
Wang Hao 2742
Round 9 on 2012/10/01 at 14:00
Wang Hao 2742
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
1-0
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
0-1
Topalov Veselin 2752
Adams Michael 2722
1-0
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
Giri Anish 2730
½-½
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
Grischuk Alexander 2754
1-0
Gelfand Boris 2738
Round 10 on 2012/10/02 at 14:00
Leko Peter 2737
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2738
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684
½-½
Grischuk Alexander 2754
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
1-0
Giri Anish 2730
Topalov Veselin 2752
½-½
Adams Michael 2722
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
½-½
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
Wang Hao 2742
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
Round 11 on 2012/10/03 at 12:00
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2729
-
Leko Peter 2737
Ivanchuk Vassily 2769
-
Wang Hao 2742
Adams Michael 2722
-
Dominguez Perez Leinier 2725
Giri Anish 2730
-
Topalov Veselin 2752
Grischuk Alexander 2754
-
Nakamura Hikaru 2783
Gelfand Boris 2738
-
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2684

Links

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