Kazan GP: Turkey's Yildiz shocks world champion Hou Yifan

6/11/2012 – It was the top against the bottom seed, the highest rated against the lowest rated player in the event. But Turkish law student WGM Betul Cemre Yildiz, playing with the black pieces, profited from a time trouble blunder by her opponent, Chinese GM Hou Yifan and finished the reigning women's world champion off in 34 moves. We bring you an illustrated report after round two.

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From June 9 to 23, 2012 Kazan, the capital of the Republic of Tatarstan, will play host to the FIDE Women's Grand Prix, part of a series of elite events organised by FIDE and Global Chess. There will be six tournaments over two years in various countries around the world. The winner of each tournament takes home 6,500 Euros, the total prize fund is 40,000 Euros. The overall winner will get a further 15,000 Euros at the end of the series. Starting time of the games is 15:00h (check your local time here).

Round one

The opening round involved a tense struggle, nevertheless first three games Viktorija Cmilyte vs Katerina Lahno, Elina Danielian vs Anna Muzychuk and Humpy Koneru vs Hou Yifan were drawn. After the first time control Alisa Galliamova managed to win against Betul Yildiz in a slightly better endgame. A long game between Antoaneta Stefanova and Nadezhda Kosintseva finished in favor of Bulgarian player. A very exciting struggle between Tatiana Kosintseva and Alexandra Kosteniuk finished in a draw.

GM Elina Danielian 2484
½-½
GM Anna Muzychuk 2598
GM Humpy Koneru 2589
½-½
GM Hou Yifan 2623
WGM Betul Cemre Yildiz 2333
0-1
IM Alisa Galliamova 2484
GM Tatiana Kosintseva 2532
½-½
GM Alexandra Kosteniuk 2457
GM Viktorija Cmilyte 2508
½-½
GM Keteryna Lahno 2546
GM Nadezhda Kosintseva 2528
0-1
GM Antoaneta Stefanova 2518


FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov starts the top game Humpy Koneru vs Hou Yifan


Alisa Galliamova, who beat Turkish WGM Betul Yildiz in a slightly better endgame


Former women's world champion Antoaneta Stefanova defeated GM Nadezhda Kosintseva

Round two


Women's world champion GM Hou Yifan facing WGM Betül Yildiz

The second day produced three decisive games. The biggest surprise was the victory of lowest seed, Turkish WGM Betul Yildiz, 2333, with the black pieces, over top seed and world champion GM Hou Yifan, 2623. The Chinese player sacrificed a piece in a very complicated position and missed a winning variation in time trouble. This game was annotated for us by GM Alejandro Ramirez:

[Event "FIDE Women's GP 2012"] [Site "Kazan"] [Date "2012.06.11"] [Round "2"] [White "Hou, Yifan"] [Black "Yildiz, Betul Cemre"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C78"] [WhiteElo "2623"] [BlackElo "2333"] [Annotator "Ramirez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "68"] [EventDate "2012.??.??"] [EventCountry "RUS"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Bc5 6. c3 b5 7. Bc2 d5 8. exd5 Qxd5 {In many variations of the Spanish, including this Moller, the game turns sharp very quickly. Here Black has seized the center and seems to have better development - but her weaknesses and uncastled king allow White to develop with tempi.} 9. d4 exd4 10. Bg5 (10. Re1+ Kf8 {transposes to a note below}) 10... Bg4 11. Bxf6 Bxf3 12. Re1+ Kf8 (12... Kd7 $5) 13. Bb3 $1 {An important intermezzo, without this White is proably just worse.} Qe4 14. Bxg7+ $6 {Too risky} (14. Bxd4 Nxd4 15. Rxe4 Bxd1 16. Bxd1 Ne6 17. Nd2 {Gives White a small pull. The h8 rook will take a few moves to get back in the game and meanwhile White may pressure the queenside. However a draw was agreed here immediately in the game Kotronias-Mamedyarov 2007}) 14... Kxg7 {It's commendable to see Yildiz's knowledge of this variation. It is not easy to outprepare the World Champion!} 15. gxf3 $2 {And this is just too ambitious. White had to settle for } (15. Rxe4 Bxd1 16. Bxd1 Rhe8 {But Black is obviously the one fighting for the initiative.}) 15... Qf5 16. Nd2 $2 {White wants to finish development, but this self imposed pin will cost a piece.} dxc3 17. bxc3 Rad8 $6 {An innacuracy, even though it is not obvious why just yet.} (17... Rhd8 18. Kh1 Qf4 {was far superior, as Black now hows h8 for her king.}) 18. Kh1 Qf4 19. Re4 Qxd2 20. Qg1+ Kf8 21. Qg4 $1 {Very resourceful. This move creates a series of threats connected with the weakness on f7. Black must tread carefully. Being able to create problems is the mark of a strong player, even if they are in worst situations.} Qd6 $4 {An unfortunate move, which might have cost dearly.} (21... Bxf2 22. Bxf7 Qxc3 {forced White to find the spectacular} 23. Rg1 $1 {and Black can try to win with Qf6 or settle for a draw with Bxg1.}) 22. Qh5 $6 (22. Qf5 $1 $18 {There is no good way to defend f7 since the bishop on c5 needs protection.} Rd7 23. Re6 {Regains the piece and gives White a winning attack.}) 22... Rd7 23. Rae1 $2 (23. Rd1 {is enough to guarantee white an advantage. She will be down material but again the threats are very strong.} Qxd1+ 24. Bxd1 Rxd1+ 25. Kg2 Rg8+ 26. Kh3 {and White is threatening both Qxc5+ and Qh6+}) 23... Bxf2 $1 {Black is back on track! This move is brave and forced. Now that g1 is covered, the attack dwindles. White is now the one that must think about saving her position.} 24. Rd1 $4 {This is too late now} (24. Re8+ Kg7 25. Rxh8 Qg6 $1 (25... Kxh8 26. Bc2 h6 27. Re8+ {is suprisingly winning.}) 26. Qxg6+ hxg6 {And Black has more than enough compensation for the exchange. Good active pieces, better structure and better coordination overall. I'd take Black in this endgame almost every time.}) 24... Qg6 $1 {A nice resource. The rook on d7 is taboo, so White must exchange queens.} (24... Rg8 {was also winning.}) 25. Qxg6 Rxd1+ {The intermediate check seals the deal. The rest is easy for the Turkish star.} 26. Bxd1 hxg6 27. Bb3 Bc5 28. Kg2 Bd6 29. h3 Rh5 30. a4 Re5 31. Rh4 Re2+ 32. Kf1 Re3 33. axb5 axb5 34. Bd5 Ne7 {A topsy turvy game! Many variations had to be calculated, but Black's bold play was rewarded at the end.} 0-1


Walked into a deadly trap: Chinese GM and top seed Hou Yifan

Playing white Anna Muzychuk (above) sacrificed a pawn in the game against Antoaneta Stefanova and in a sharp position managed to defeat the former world champion.

Viktorija Cmilyte got a position with a huge advantage, playing with black against Alexandra Kosteniuk (above right), but missed good chances to win the game in the time trouble and in the end in fact lost.

Alisa Galliamova (above right) could have scored the second point today but didn’t choose the right move in time trouble, playing against Tatiana Kosintseva. As a result the game finished in a draw.

Two more games, Kateryna Lahno vs Nadezhda Kosintseva (above) and Elina Danielian vs Humpy Koneru ended peacefully. After the second round three players, Anna Muzychuk, Alisa Galliamova and Alexandra Kosteniuk, share the first place with 1.5 points.

GM Anna Muzychuk 2598
1-0
GM Antoaneta Stefanova 2518
GM Keteryna Lahno 2546
½-½
GM Nadezhda Kosintseva 2528
GM Alexandra Kosteniuk 2457
1-0
GM Viktorija Cmilyte 2508
IM Alisa Galliamova 2484
½-½
GM Tatiana Kosintseva 2532
GM Hou Yifan 2623
0-1
WGM Betul Cemre Yildiz 2333
GM Elina Danielian 2484
½-½
GM Humpy Koneru 2589

Video stream of the round

The Russian organisers are providing a HD video stream
of the action with expert commentary from Kazan.

Photos and reports by Anastasiya Karlovich and Rashit Shiriyazdanov, with kind permission of FIDE

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 11 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


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