GRENKE Rd2: Carlsen early leader

by Alejandro Ramirez
2/3/2015 – The second round of this tournament was certainly more exciting than the first one, despite the three draws. Caruana-Bacrot was certainly a bizarre game, as White won the queenside battle but his bishop got trapped on g5 (?!). Carlsen put his typical World Champion pressure on Adams, slowly poking at his opponent's pawns, until the Englishman simply collapsed.

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Round 02 - February 03, 2015, 15:00
Anand Viswanathan 2797 ½-½ Naiditsch Arkadij 2706
Carlsen Magnus 2865 1-0 Adams Michael 2738
Baramidze David 2594 ½-½ Aronian Levon 2777
Caruana Fabiano 2811 ½-½ Bacrot Etienne 2711

Daniel King shows the game Carlsen vs Adams

The second round of this tournament was certainly more exciting than the first one, despite the three draws.

Carlsen always has his squad with him. Father, Henrik Carlsen,
and a crew from TV2, this time with reporter Erle Marki Hansen.

Anand, Viswanathan ½-½ Naiditsch, Arkadij
Anand tried to squeeze the German player in an unpleasant rook endgame, but Naiditsch was up to the task:

[Event "GRENKE Chess Classic 2015"] [Site "Baden-Baden"] [Date "2015.02.03"] [Round "2"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Naiditsch, Arkadij"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D41"] [WhiteElo "2797"] [BlackElo "2706"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "105"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "GER"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000+30:900+30"] 1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {0} e6 {0} 3. Nf3 {0} d5 {0} 4. Nc3 {0} c5 {2} 5. cxd5 {14} Nxd5 {10} 6. e4 {6} Nxc3 {7} 7. bxc3 {6} cxd4 {7} 8. cxd4 {6} Bb4+ {6} 9. Bd2 {5} Bxd2+ {8} 10. Qxd2 {5} O-O {9} 11. Rc1 {44} Nc6 {38} 12. Bc4 {189} Qa5 {50} 13. d5 {118} exd5 {650} 14. Qxa5 Nxa5 {8} 15. Bxd5 {648} Be6 {156} 16. Bxe6 {33} fxe6 {7} 17. Ne5 {13} Rfd8 {1139} 18. Ke2 {274} Rd4 {122} 19. Ke3 { 1089} Ra4 {842} 20. Rhd1 {669} Nc6 {371} 21. Nxc6 {43} bxc6 {6} 22. Rd2 {372} Rc8 {497} 23. Rc5 {12} Kf8 {222} 24. h4 {464} h6 {382} 25. Kf4 {203} Ke7 {15} 26. Ke5 {256 Anand is squeezing his advantage against his opponent. The rook endgame is very unpleasant as White is both better placed and has the better structure. It is not far from trivial though.} Rb8 $1 {291 An impotant endgame lesson: activity is usually worth more than material.} 27. Rxc6 {125} Rb5+ {39} 28. Kf4 {11} Rba5 {347} 29. f3 {674} g5+ {334} 30. hxg5 {53} hxg5+ {5} 31. Kg3 {145 Protecting the g2 pawn in certain variations.} Rxa2 {20} 32. Rc7+ $6 {97 Perhaps not the most testing.} (32. Rdd6 $1 {This was more testing. Black cannot afford to lose this pawn for free, so he must defend it.} Re5 $1 33. Ra6 Rxa6 34. Rxa6 Kf6 $1 35. Rxa7 {This edngame should be drawn somehow. The 3v2 on the kingside should not have enough pawns to force a win.}) 32... Kf6 {68} 33. Rdd7 {28} Ke5 {424} 34. Rg7 {44} Kd6 {344} 35. Rcd7+ {238} Kc6 {6} 36. Rd1 {31} a6 {151} 37. Rgd7 {247} Re5 {40} 38. Rd8 {25} a5 {187 Black kept his extra pawn and White is running out of resources to try to win.} 39. Rc1+ {169} Kb7 {171} 40. Rdc8 {103} Rb2 {120} 41. R1c6 {3601} a4 {712} 42. R6c7+ {0} Kb6 { 97} 43. Rc4 {0} Kb5 {588} 44. Rd4 {0} a3 {429} 45. Ra8 {0} Rc5 {10} 46. Rxa3 {0 } Rcc2 {7} 47. Kg4 {0} Rxg2+ {30} 48. Kh5 {0} Rg3 {81} 49. Rdd3 {0} Rh2+ {207} 50. Kg6 {0} Rhh3 {55} 51. Rab3+ {0} Kc4 {72} 52. Rbc3+ {0} Kb4 {91} 53. Rb3+ {0 } 1/2-1/2

Arkadij Naiditsch solidly drew his two starting blacks

Carlsen, Magnus 1-0 Adams, Michael
In typical fashion for the reigning World Champion, Carlsen accumulated pressure, and pressure, and more pressure against Adams until Black cracked.

Carlsen has been on a roll after his loss against Radoslaw Wojtaszek in Wijk aan Zee

[Event "GRENKE Chess Classic 2015"] [Site "Baden-Baden"] [Date "2015.02.03"] [Round "2"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Adams, Michael"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2865"] [BlackElo "2738"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "127"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "GER"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000+30:900+30"] 1. c4 {0} e5 {0} 2. Nc3 {0} Nf6 {0} 3. Nf3 {0} Nc6 {0} 4. g3 {1} Bb4 {45} 5. Nd5 {18} Bc5 {46} 6. Bg2 {50} d6 {55} 7. O-O {118} O-O {62} 8. d3 {478} Nxd5 { 252} 9. cxd5 {5} Nd4 {6} 10. Nxd4 {203} exd4 {64 Taking with the bishop is more common, there is an old rapid between Karpov and Anand in this line.} 11. Bd2 {159} a5 {177} 12. e4 {615} dxe3 {495} 13. fxe3 {41} Qg5 {613} 14. Rf4 {360 } Bd7 {23} 15. a4 {699} Rae8 {1701 The position is not easy to evaluate. White's pawn structure is strange but it controls a lot of central squares and it will lock out the dark-squared bishop once d4 is achieved. Also, b4 is coming opening up some important lines in the queenside. For this reason maybe 15...Rfe8 was better as White doesn't have real pressure on the kingside.} 16. d4 {65} Bb6 {138} 17. Qb3 {903} Qd8 {292} 18. Qc4 {27} Re7 {364} 19. b4 {109} axb4 {98} 20. a5 {10} Ba7 {14} 21. Qxb4 {164 Black's queenside is very vulnerable.} c5 {138} (21... Qc8 {is just a sad move to make.}) 22. dxc6 {281} Bxc6 {94} 23. Qb3 {199} (23. Bxc6 bxc6 24. Qc4 $14 {was also possible.}) 23... Bxg2 {373} 24. Kxg2 {2} Qd7 {37} 25. Raf1 {269 White is without a doubt a little better. His pressure on f7 is slightly annoying, as is his pressure on b7. Black doesn't have a particularly useful plan, his only plus is his pressure on the e3 weakness.} Rc8 {180} 26. Rf5 {119} h6 {236} 27. R1f2 {134} Bb8 {312} 28. Bb4 {442} Qc6+ {355} 29. R2f3 {134} Rcc7 {92} 30. Be1 {389} (30. Qd5 $1 $14) 30... Qe8 {250} (30... g6 $1 31. Rf6 Qc2+ 32. Qxc2 Rxc2+ $11) 31. g4 {80} Re4 {148} 32. h3 {55} Rce7 {72} 33. Bf2 {9 Black's tripling on the e-file seems counterintuitive. The pressure on e3 will always be sustained by a bishop either on f2 or d2, so it begs the question of what these major pieces are doing exactly.} R4e6 {61} 34. Rb5 {120} Bc7 {18} 35. Rxb7 {160} Qa8 $2 {19 This simply lets Carlsen stay up a pawn. Even though it isn't pretty, Adams had to take on a5.} (35... Bxa5 36. Rb8 Bd8 37. Bh4 Rd7 {Black's pinned in every direction, but nothing is hanging and nothing can be attacked. Black might just be holding this.}) 36. Rb5 {36} Re8 {81} 37. Qd5 {31} Qxd5 {73} 38. Rxd5 $16 {1 It's very uncomfortable to play almost equal endgames against Carlsen. It's almost impossible to play pawn down endgames against Carlsen.} Rb8 {14} 39. Bg3 {500} g6 {36} 40. h4 {122} Ra8 {117} 41. Be1 {98} Re4 {848} 42. g5 {159} h5 {121} 43. Rb5 {65} Ra7 {10} 44. Kf1 {119} Re8 {261} 45. Ke2 { 343} Rea8 {79} 46. Rf6 {192} Ra6 {53} 47. Bb4 {199} Bxa5 {58} 48. Rxa5 {32} Rxa5 {5} 49. Bxa5 {4} Rxa5 {5} 50. Rxd6 {6} Kf8 {38} 51. Rf6 {13 This position is already lost. White's plan is very simple; push the pawns with the support of the king. Black can't do anything about it.} Ra3 {74} 52. Kf3 {15} Ke7 {36} 53. Ke4 {22} Ra5 {9} 54. Rf4 {25} Rb5 {202} 55. d5 {12} Rb3 {104} 56. Kd4 {12} Ra3 {4} 57. e4 {10} Rb3 {52} 58. Ke5 {12} Rd3 {6} 59. Rf1 {33} Rh3 {8 Black's counterplay is too weak, too slow.} 60. Ra1 {84} Rxh4 {17} 61. d6+ {917} Kd7 { 918} 62. Ra7+ {7} Ke8 {6} 63. Ra8+ {23} Kd7 {5} 64. Rf8 {6} 1-0

Adams succumbed after a long defense

Baramidze, David ½-½ Aronian, Levon
This game could not have been more dull. Aronian played a solid line with Black that Baramidze didn't really try to bring down. A bunch of trades later the draw was agreed.

Well, what can you do when you are black?

Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ Bacrot, Etienne
An incredibly strange game in which Black's dark-squared control was just barely sufficient to hold the position together.

[Event "GRENKE Chess Classic 2015"] [Site "Baden-Baden"] [Date "2015.02.03"] [Round "2"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Bacrot, Etienne"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E60"] [WhiteElo "2811"] [BlackElo "2711"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"] [PlyCount "107"] [EventDate "2015.??.??"] [EventCountry "GER"] [TimeControl "40/6000+30:20/3000+30:900+30"] 1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {0} g6 {0} 3. f3 {0} d6 {351} 4. e4 {0} Bg7 {5} 5. Ne2 {5} O-O {10} 6. Be3 {10} c5 {714} 7. Qd2 {8} Nc6 {386} 8. d5 {25} Ne5 {23} 9. Nec3 {87} Nh5 {601} 10. Be2 {614} f5 {113} 11. Na3 {124} f4 {180} 12. Bf2 {8} Bd7 {143} 13. Nc2 {527} a6 {268} 14. a4 {725} g5 {375} 15. a5 {468} Qe8 {80} 16. Rb1 {271} b5 {486} 17. axb6 {279} a5 {6} 18. Na3 {347} Qb8 {177} 19. Nab5 { 400} Qxb6 {146} 20. Ra1 {14} Rfb8 {1236} 21. Ra3 {89} Qd8 {70} 22. Kd1 {545} h6 {606} 23. Kc2 {77} Nf6 {10} 24. h4 {393} Be8 {223} 25. hxg5 {257} hxg5 {2} 26. g3 {145} Nh5 {42} 27. Rg1 {142} Rb7 {206} 28. gxf4 {145} gxf4 {2} 29. Bh4 {558} a4 {153} 30. Bg5 {115} Ng6 {64} 31. Rga1 {131} Qc8 {154 The only way to describe this position is as strange. Everything is going well for White: the queenside is locked and a4 is about to fall. He has evacuated the kingside and his king will not die on that side of the board... but, unfortunately, his bishop on g5 is trapped!} 32. Bf1 {283} (32. Rxa4 Rxa4 33. Rxa4 Bxb5 34. Nxb5 Qh3 {actually gives Black too much counterplay. The bishop ends up trapped on g5.}) 32... Ng3 {13} 33. Bd3 {125} Bxb5 {102} 34. Nxb5 {39} Qh3 {15} 35. Bxf4 { 57} Nxf4 {6} 36. Qxf4 {2} Rf8 {16 The bishop was rescued, but now the rook comes in to attack.} 37. Qd2 {32} Rxf3 {27} 38. Rxa4 {55} Bh6 {13} (38... Qh4 $1 {taking control of f2 and preparing Qf6, would have put White in some problems.}) 39. Ra8+ {21} Kf7 {5} 40. Rh8 {30} Bxd2 {133} 41. Rxh3 {3014} Bf4 { 94} 42. Rh7+ {0} Kg6 {1270} 43. Rh2 {0} Be5 {34 The dust has cleared. White is up a pawn, but it is useless in this opposite colored bishop situation.} 44. Ra8 {0} Kg5 {398} 45. Be2 {0} Rf7 {467} 46. Rg8+ {0} Rg7 {46} 47. Rf8 {0} Rg6 { 327} 48. Bd3 {0} Rf6 {66} 49. Rf2 {0} Rxf2+ {275} 50. Rxf2 {0} Rb8 {4} 51. Kb3 {0} Bd4 {185} 52. Rf3 {0} Kg4 {62} 53. Rf7 {0} Bf6 {8} 54. Kc2 {200} 1/2-1/2

A very strange game, it is not common to have a trapped bishop on g5!

Standings

Replay Round Two Games

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Schedule

Round 01 - February 02, 2015, 15:00
Caruana Fabiano 2811 ½-½ Anand Viswanathan 2797
Bacrot Etienne 2711 ½-½ Baramidze David 2594
Aronian Levon 2777 ½-½ Carlsen Magnus 2865
Adams Michael 2738 ½-½ Naiditsch Arkadij 2706
Round 02 - February 03, 2015, 15:00
Anand Viswanathan 2797 ½-½ Naiditsch Arkadij 2706
Carlsen Magnus 2865 1-0 Adams Michael 2738
Baramidze David 2594 ½-½ Aronian Levon 2777
Caruana Fabiano 2811 ½-½ Bacrot Etienne 2711
Round 03 - February 04, 2015, 15:00
Bacrot Etienne 2711 - Anand Viswanathan 2797
Aronian Levon 2777 - Caruana Fabiano 2811
Adams Michael 2738 - Baramidze David 2594
Naiditsch Arkadij 2706 - Carlsen Magnus 2865
Round 04 - February 06, 2015, 15:00
Anand Viswanathan 2797 - Carlsen Magnus 2865
Baramidze David 2594 - Naiditsch Arkadij 2706
Caruana Fabiano 2811 - Adams Michael 2738
Bacrot Etienne 2711 - Aronian Levon 2777
Round 05 - February 07, 2015, 15:00
Aronian Levon 2777 - Anand Viswanathan 2797
Adams Michael 2738 - Bacrot Etienne 2711
Naiditsch Arkadij 2706 - Caruana Fabiano 2811
Carlsen Magnus 2865 - Baramidze David 2594
Round 06 - February 08, 2015, 15:00
Anand Viswanathan 2797 - Baramidze David 2594
Caruana Fabiano 2811 - Carlsen Magnus 2865
Bacrot Etienne 2711 - Naiditsch Arkadij 2706
Aronian Levon 2777 - Adams Michael 2738
Round 07 - February 09, 2015, 15:00
Adams Michael 2738 - Anand Viswanathan 2797
Naiditsch Arkadij 2706 - Aronian Levon 2777
Carlsen Magnus 2865 - Bacrot Etienne 2711
Baramidze David 2594 - Caruana Fabiano 2811

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04.02.2014 Round 3 Daniel King
05.02.2014 Free Day  
06.02.2014 Round 4 Daniel King
07.02.2014 Round 5 Oliver Reeh/Dorian Rogozenco
08.02.2014 Round 6 Simon Williams
09.02.2014 Round 7 Mihail Marin

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All photos: Georgios Souleidis


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Grandmaster Alejandro Ramirez has been playing tournament chess since 1998. His accomplishments include qualifying for the 2004 and 2013 World Cups as well as playing for Costa Rica in the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympiads. He currently has a rating of 2583 and is author of a number of popular and critically acclaimed ChessBase-DVDs.
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Great_Scot Great_Scot 2/4/2015 02:54
In the commentary on Anand-Naiditsch, Ramirez asserts that the rook and pawn ending in the 32. Rdd6! line should be drawn. However, it is actually a forced win for white. Just let Stockfish run on that position for a few minutes (with tablebases) and it's eval will keep climbing (mine got to +73 at d=49 after ~5 minutes before I stopped it). Not saying it's easy or clear, but it definitely is a theoretical win.
drgibbon drgibbon 2/3/2015 11:06
"Black's counterplay is too weak, too slow.", haha, a little nod to Carlsen's YouTube blitz trash talk there ;)
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