Gelfand and Caruana share first in Baku

10/14/2014 – The final round of the Baku Grand Prix was quite appropriate all things considered. Five of the six games drew, and this was closer to par for the event than the nervy couple of rounds towards the end, while Fabiano Caruana and Boris Gelfand, both of whom headlined the event throughout shared first. The only win was Grischuk's victory over a luckless Dominguez. Last round report.

 

The first stage of the 2014-2015 FIDE Grand Prix is taking place in Baku, Azerbaijan. The tournament will run from October 1st to October 15, 2014. Some of the strongest players in the world will compete in a Round Robin event. The winner and runner-up of the Grand Prix series will earn their spot at the 2016 Candidate's Tournament.

Round Eleven

Round 11 – October 14 2014, 13:00h
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
½-½
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
½-½
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
Svidler, Peter 2732
½-½
Gelfand, Boris 2748
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
½-½
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
1-0
Dominguez, Leinier 2751

The final round did not see that much excitement, but there were a few games that are worthy of attention.

Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar ½-½ Kasimdzhanov, Rustam
Definitely a cool game to see. Kasimdzhanov followed in Edouard's footsteps and sacrificed an early exchange in a weird variation of the Queen's Gambit Accepted. Mamedyarov did not know what to do and his position worsened gradually. Kasimdzhanov had a chance for an absolute brilliancy, but to be fair it is beyond most top grandmaster's grasps to see the computer recommendation. Missing this chance, he simplified the game to a simple draw. Definitely an opening success, white players are going to have to be sharper against this variation if he wants an advantage.

Kasimdzhanov and Karjakin sharing a joke before the final round

Mamedyarov carried a -1 score throughout the tournament and finished there

Radjabov, Teimour ½-½ Nakamura, Hikaru
Following an old (old!? it was 2001!) game between Nikolic and Polgar the players reached a known King's Indian Fianchetto variation structure that is difficult to say really benefits White very much. Nakamura equalized comfortably and brought home a nice half point without too many troubles.

Radjabov's 50% in home court was not a bad result

Nakamura was part of the big tie for third with 6.0/11

Svidler, Peter ½-½ Gelfand, Boris
Svidler sacrificed a pawn for some initiative in a sharp Najdorf, but Gelfand showed excellent understanding of the position. By counter-sacrificing the pawn and forcing a queen trade his problems were basically solved, and an inaccurate move by Svidler made sure that White was not playing for a win. Gelfand keeps showing great preparation in both of his pet Sicilians, the Najdorf and the Sveshnikov.

A good last round draw allows Gelfand to tie for first in the tournament

Andreikin, Dmitry ½-½ Karjakin, Sergey
Karjakin's understanding of the hedgehog structures might be the best in the chess world. He had no problems defending his position against Andreikin's attempts to create any danger and simplifications kept making his task easier and easier. A draw was all either side could hope for once they entered the endgame.

Caruana, Fabiano ½-½ Tomashevsky, Evgeny
Caruana tried to go into a quick anti-Marshall variation of the Spanish, but Tomashevsky keeps proving that all of these anti-Marshalls are his home field. He never had any real problems in the position and he knew exactly how to neutralize any attempt at an attack by Caruana.

Solid Tomashevsky finished with a good +1 score
(ten draws and a win against Andreikin) and a tie for third

Grischuk, Alexander 1-0 Dominguez, Leinier
A lovely attacking game. Despite the early trade of queens it was clear that Black's king was in serious danger. The structure was too dangerous for the black monarch and a swift doubling of rooks on the h-file proved deadly to it. Despite Grischuk missing mate (!) he was still sufficiently ahead in the position to force resignation.

A disastrous event for Dominguez, who will need to recover for the future GP events

Tomorrow we will be bringing you a full report on the closing ceremony, what this tournament means to the World Championship qualification cycle, and an updated on the new top 10 of the World in the live rating list, a list that was influenced heavily by this event and the Millionaire Chess tournament in Las Vegas!

Round Eleven Games

Select from the dropdown menu to replay the games

Standings

Schedule

Round 01 – October 02 2014, 15:00h
Dominguez, Leinier 2751
½-½
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
½-½
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
0-1
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
Gelfand, Boris 2748
1-0
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
½-½
Svidler, Peter 2732
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
Round 02 – October 03 2014, 15:00h
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
Svidler, Peter 2732
1-0
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
0-1
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
½-½
Gelfand, Boris 2748
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
½-½
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
Dominguez, Leinier 2751
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
Round 03 – October 04 2014, 15:00h
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
½-½
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
1-0
Dominguez, Leinier 2751
Gelfand, Boris 2748
1-0
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
½-½
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
½-½
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
½-½
Svidler, Peter 2732
Round 04 – October 05 2014, 15:00h
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
½-½
Svidler, Peter 2732
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
1-0
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
½-½
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
Dominguez, Leinier 2751
½-½
Gelfand, Boris 2748
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
½-½
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
Round 05 – October 07 2014, 15:00h
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
½-½
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
Gelfand, Boris 2748
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
½-½
Dominguez, Leinier 2751
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
½-½
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
½-½
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
Svidler, Peter 2732
½-½
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
Round 06 – October 08 2014, 15:00h
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
1-0
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
1-0
Svidler, Peter 2732
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
0-1
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
Dominguez, Leinier 2751
½-½
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
½-½
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
½-½
Gelfand, Boris 2748
Round 07 – October 09 2014, 15:00h
Gelfand, Boris 2748
½-½
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
0-1
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
½-½
Dominguez, Leinier 2751
Svidler, Peter 2732
½-½
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
1-0
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
Round 08 – October 10 2014, 15:00h
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
½-½
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
½-½
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
Dominguez, Leinier 2751
0-1
Svidler, Peter 2732
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
½-½
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
½-½
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
Gelfand, Boris 2748
½-½
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
Round 09 – October 12 2014, 15:00h
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
1-0
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
1-0
Gelfand, Boris 2748
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
½-½
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
Svidler, Peter 2732
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
1-0
Dominguez, Leinier 2751
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
0-1
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
Round 10 – October 13 2014, 15:00h
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
0-1
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
Dominguez, Leinier 2751
0-1
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
1-0
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
½-½
Svidler, Peter 2732
Gelfand, Boris 2748
1-0
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
½-½
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
Round 11 – October 14 2014, 13:00h
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2764
½-½
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam 2706
Radjabov, Teimour 2726
½-½
Nakamura, Hikaru 2764
Svidler, Peter 2732
½-½
Gelfand, Boris 2748
Andreikin, Dmitry 2722
½-½
Karjakin, Sergey 2767
Caruana, Fabiano 2844
½-½
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2701
Grischuk, Alexander 2797
1-0
Dominguez, Leinier 2751

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.

Topics Grand Prix , Baku
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vincero vincero 10/14/2014 05:16
Tomashevsky is the only surprise here.
the_chess_fan the_chess_fan 10/14/2014 05:34
Iran's representative GM Ghaem Maghami cannot play with GM Gelfand because of political reasons (in fact, the Iranian state does not permit its citizens to compete with Israeli athletes, and if they do so, they will be persecuted and annoyed- even if imprisoned- by the state). I just want to ask whether Mr. Ilyumzhinov is aware of this reality or not and what is his idea about GM Ghaem Maghami's losing by forfeit? If Gelfand win by forfeit, is it not a privilege for him while the other players have to play with Ghaem Maghami for hours?
Eric83 Eric83 10/14/2014 05:36
Caruana is experimenting the Magnus syndrome : losing rating points even when winning the tounament....
algorithmy algorithmy 10/14/2014 09:38
<Chessfan>what on earth r u talking about?! who said they both r going to play? and when? beside it would be of course Ghaiems Prooblem not fide. Chess is international game, and u should play gainst whoever player paired against u, and even if u have have personal essues with him u can avoid checkhand but to refuse to play, and so Gm Ghaiems Problem not Gelfand or fide.
Niima Niima 10/14/2014 10:05
I have always been a fan of Grischuk - his chess, independent character and his tendency to speak up his mind. I love his comment about why his second half of the tournament was better than the first - his move to a hotel with windows :-)

“I felt like I was in a submarine for more than one week. When I was waking up I felt like I'm pregnant. I was feeling so bad every morning, the whole day, and my play showed it very clearly. Of course I'm lucky that I won three games out of four after I moved but still, the level of my play increased dramatically.”

the_chess_fan the_chess_fan 10/14/2014 10:18
<algorithmy>both of them are present in Tashkent and Moscow, and therefore they have to play with each other in two games. I am not saying that it is the fault of Gelfand or Ghaem Maghami. I think that FIDE is aware of this problem, and they should not have announced Iran as one of the host cities, since the Iranian nominee (whoever he is) cannot play with Gelfand, and it is not proper to see that in such a level of chess, the political controversies affect the results. Gelfand is going to earn 2 free wins, while the other players have to play with Ghaem Maghami who is not that much weak to lose all his games. He is an experienced player with an Elo rating around 2600. This week, GM Ghaem Maghami made a draw with Bu Xiangzhi (2706.9) in Millionaire Chess Tournament. My point is that it is not fair that the other players have to play with him for several hours, while Gelfand will win by Ghaem Maghami's forfeit (although I believe that this is the problem of FIDE and also the the Iranian state, not Gelfand, or Ghaem Maghami who has to forfeit otherwise will be punished by the Iranian state). My next point is that it is impossible that FIDE has not been aware of this problem, and yet has nominated Iran as one of the host cities (Of course, every one knows that it is related to the FIDE presidential election and Iran's massive support of Ilyumzhinov). It is not proper for a Grand Prix tournament (that many elite players participate in it) to have forfeits.
algorithmy algorithmy 10/15/2014 11:05
I see!!, I didnt know Ghaem was going to play in the grand prix series, so thx for correcting me <chess_fan>, though still i think Ghaem should simply play. Chess shouldn't be mixed with politics, but then I'm curious, is Gelfand will go to Iran in first place?!! is it even allowed for him to do? strange situation. I really hate this world! full of idiots who r distorying every beautifull thing, even a chess game they can't leave it alone!. But any way, my point was that GM Ghaem should play Gelfand of course under any circumstances just for respect of the game. I am actually against Isreal as a state, and i think they stolen the Palastin land, still i would play against Gelfand in a tournament and shake his hand too just for sake of chess and organisers who do alot of work to promote chess.
the_chess_fan the_chess_fan 10/15/2014 12:35
Iranian athletes do not dare to play with their Israeli counterparts, because the Iran's regime would annoy them severely. It is not GM Ghaem's fault. but hey! BREAKING NEWS:
"In accordance with the Grand Prix contractual terms, FIDE announces the change of the third leg of the Grand Prix series to Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia. The dates remain exactly the same as announced in FIDE Calendar.

The representative for the new host city is GM Baadur Jobava who replaces GM Ghaem Maghami with his complete playing schedule. "
Is not it strange?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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