FIDE Grand Prix - Geneva: Off to a flying start!

by Alex Yermolinsky
7/8/2017 – Only two rounds into the third installment of the AGONizing FIDE Grand Prix series, and it already appears to be the best to date. After a snoozefest in Sharjah, it picked up a bit in Moscow, but in Geneva they just sprinted out of the gates at full steam. If round one was a pleasant surprise, round two was sensational with five decisive games, nearly six, including excellent wins by Aronian and Radjabov, who has 2.0/2. Report and analysis by GM Yermolinsky.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14 Download

Everyone uses ChessBase, from the World Champion to the amateur next door. Start your personal success story with ChessBase 14 and enjoy your chess even more!

More...

The Grand Prix is being organized by Agon Limited, the commercial partner of the World Chess Federation, the game’s governing body. Agon has the exclusive commercial rights to organize the cycle of the World Championship.

Each Grand Prix has a prize fund of 130,000 euros, and the Geneva Grand Prix is supported by EG Capital Advisors, Kaspersky Lab and S.T. Dupont.

Twenty-four of the world’s best players are competing in the Grand Prix, with 18 of them participating in each of the tournaments. They will play a nine round swiss open played at 100 minutes for the first 40 moves, 50 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game plus an additional 30 seconds per move starting from move one.

The tournament runs from June 6-15, with a rest day on June 11 after round five. Each round starts at 2 pm local time (8 am New York time).

Round two

Bo.
No.
 
Name
Rtg
Pts.
Result
Pts.
 
Name
Rtg
No.
1
12
GM
Radjabov Teimour
2724
1
1 - 0
1
GM
Eljanov Pavel
2739
7
2
8
GM
Harikrishna Pentala
2737
1
½ - ½
1
GM
Adams Michael
2736
9
3
14
GM
Jakovenko Dmitry
2703
½
0 - 1
½
GM
Aronian Levon
2809
1
4
2
GM
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
2800
½
1 - 0
½
GM
Inarkiev Ernesto
2707
13
5
4
GM
Grischuk Alexander
2761
½
1 - 0
½
GM
Rapport Richard
2694
15
6
10
GM
Li Chao B
2735
½
½ - ½
½
GM
Svidler Peter
2749
5
7
6
GM
Nepomniachtchi Ian
2742
½
½ - ½
½
GM
Gelfand Boris
2728
11
8
18
GM
Salem A.R. Saleh
2638
0
0 - 1
0
GM
Giri Anish
2775
3
9
16
GM
Hou Yifan
2666
0
½ - ½
0
GM
Riazantsev Alexander
2654
17

Photos by FIDE

A pleasant surprise is the sudden resurgence of Teimour Radjabov. Two wins in the first two rounds, and both were excellent games at that.

Teimour Radjabov - Pavel Eljanov

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.07"] [Round "2"] [White "Radjabov, Teimour"] [Black "Eljanov, Pavel"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E16"] [WhiteElo "2724"] [BlackElo "2739"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Bb7 5. Bg2 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Be7 7. Nc3 c6 8. e4 d5 9. exd5 $1 {A modern treatment of this well-known variation.} cxd5 10. Ne5 O-O 11. O-O Nc6 12. Bf4 {A relatively fresh idea.} (12. cxd5 Nxe5 13. d6 (13. dxe5 Nxd5 14. Rc1 Nxc3 15. Bxc3 Bxg2 16. Kxg2 Qc8 17. Qf3 {only leaves White with the smallest of advantages.}) 13... Nc6 14. dxe7 Qxe7 15. Bg5 h6 16. d5 Na5 $1 {was seen in Anand -Carlsen, WCh Sochi, 2014}) 12... Na5 13. Rc1 (13. Bg5 $5 {is counterintuitive - why move the bishop again - but it brought White success in Van Wely-Tkachiev} Rc8 (13... Ba6 $5) 14. Bxf6 Bxf6 15. cxd5 Bxd5 16. Nxd5 exd5 17. Re1 $14) 13... dxc4 14. Bxb7 Nxb7 15. Nxc4 {[#] This isn't your Grandfather's IQP position. Seemingly White has committed a cardinal sin of trading his light-squared bishop, but he's not playing for a kingside attack just yet. Black has his own set of problems: an awkward Nb7 and general weakness of the light squares caused by b7-b6.} Bb4 (15... Na5 16. Ne3 $1 { aiming at d4-d5.}) 16. Bg5 $1 {It's all about the d5-square.} Nd6 17. Nxd6 Bxd6 ({It's undertandable Pavel didn't want to weaken his king. Possible lines, such as} 17... Qxd6 18. Bxf6 gxf6 19. Ne4 Qd8 20. Rc4 Be7 21. Nc3 Rc8 22. Ra4 $1 a5 23. d5 {did seem unnerving.}) 18. d5 $1 exd5 19. Nxd5 Be5 20. Bxf6 Bxf6 21. b4 {[#] What we have here is a symmetrical pawn structure in a open position, with Black supposedly keeping a better minor piece. So, why isn't this equal? The answer to this mystery lies in the activity of the white pieces and Black's struggles to find a safe square for his queen.} Qd6 ({ Suppose, he does everything by the book:} 21... g6 22. Qf3 Bg7 {hides the bishop,} 23. Rfd1 Qg5 {lets the queen out,} 24. h4 Qe5 25. Rc7 b5 {improves the queenside pawn structure,} 26. Re7 Qd6 27. Rd7 $1 Qe5 28. Kg2 {and then what? Black is practically out of moves. Sample lines ot illustrate his problems are:} h5 (28... a6 29. Nb6 Rab8 30. R7d5 Qe7 31. Nd7) (28... a5 29. bxa5 Rxa5 30. Ne7+ Kh8 31. Nc6) 29. Re7 Qd6 30. Rb7 Qe5 31. a3 $1 ({not even} 31. Rxb5) 31... Rae8 32. Rxb5 {with a decisive advantage for White everywhere.} ) 22. Qf3 Rac8 23. Rcd1 $1 {No way Teimour was going to trade rooks.} Rfe8 24. b5 $6 {One and only inaccuracy allowed by Radjabov until time trouble.} ({ Instead, the prophylactic} 24. Kg2 $1 {would pose an interesting dilemma to his opponent: should Black just stay put or should be attempt a bailout,} Be7 $5 25. Rfe1 Bf8 26. Ne7+ Bxe7 27. Rxd6 Bxd6 28. Rxe8+ Rxe8 29. Qc6 Re6 30. Qa8+ Bf8 31. a3 Re7 {Can this be held? White will certainly try his best.}) 24... Be7 25. Rd4 (25. Rfe1 Bf8 26. Ne7+ $4 {now meets with} Rxe7 27. Rxd6 Rxe1+ 28. Kg2 Bxd6 $19) 25... Bf8 26. Rfd1 Rc5 $2 {[#] An unfortunate idea.} ({It was high time to work out a queen trade,} 26... Qe6 27. Kg2 (27. Rg4 Qe2) 27... Qe2 28. Ra4 Qxf3+ 29. Kxf3 {and Black doesn't have to fear losing the a-pawn:} Rc5 ({or} 29... Rc2 30. Rxa7 Bc5 31. Ne3 Rc3) 30. Rxa7 Rxb5 31. Nc7 Rf5+ 32. Kg4 Ree5 $11) 27. a4 Qe6 28. Rg4 Kh8 ({Black falls victim to the back rank weakness after} 28... Qe2 $2 29. Qxe2 Rxe2 30. Nf6+ Kh8 31. Rd8) 29. Rf4 Kg8 30. h4 Rc2 31. Kg2 h6 32. h5 {Pavel seemed to have run out of useful moves, and, possibly, the clock had become an issue as well.} Rcc8 33. Rdd4 $3 { Powerful centralization, reminiscent of the classic game Spassky-Fischer, Mar del Plata 1960.} Bc5 34. Rde4 Qd7 35. Rg4 $1 Kf8 {[#]} (35... Kh8 36. Nf6) 36. Ref4 {A little hesitation that spoils it a bit.} ({Already,} 36. Rxg7 $1 { was decisive:} Rxe4 (36... Kxg7 37. Qc3+ f6 38. Nxf6) 37. Rg8+ $1 Kxg8 38. Nf6+ Kg7 39. Nxd7 Re6 40. Qg4+ Kh7 41. Ne5 $1 Rxe5 42. Qxc8 Rxh5 43. Qd7 Kg6 44. f4 {and the rest is automatic.}) 36... Bd6 ({Pavel's best chance was} 36... Red8 37. Rxf7+ Qxf7 38. Rf4 Rd7 39. Rxf7+ Rxf7 40. Nf4 Kg8 41. Qd5 Re8 {White should win, but it'd take some time.}) 37. Rd4 (37. Rxg7 $1 Bxf4 38. Rg8+ { the same motif again.}) 37... Qb7 {[#]} 38. Rxg7 $1 {Finally Teimour lands a mortal blow.} Be5 (38... Kxg7 39. Rg4+ Kf8 40. Rg8+ Kxg8 41. Nf6+ Kf8 42. Qxb7 Rc7 43. Qd5 Re6 44. Qa8+ Kg7 45. Ne8+) 39. Rg8+ Kxg8 40. Nf6+ Bxf6 41. Rg4+ { Despite the uncertain finish, this game is a masterpiece by Radjabov.} 1-0

I guess by now the participants of the Grand Prix realize what they are playing for - two qualification spots to the Candidates and not much beyond that. Even the modest prize money announced for this year's cycle has not been paid on time, much to the chagrin of the players.

The chess internet is abuzz with anti-AGON sentiment, and, I suppose, the readers expect me to weigh in on this. Sorry to disappoint you, but no further hint of criticism directed at AGON will come from the author of these words. You are free to think AGON has paid me a million dollars to keep mum.

Back to chess. Levon Aronian's qualification hopes wedge on winning the two remaining tournaments. Today he played with reckless abandon suitable for a must-win situation, and it paid off.

Levon Aronian, genius at work

Dmitry Jakovenko - Levon Aronian

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.07"] [Round "2"] [White "Jakovenko, Dmitry"] [Black "Aronian, Levon"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C54"] [WhiteElo "2703"] [BlackElo "2809"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "102"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. O-O Nf6 5. d3 O-O 6. c3 a6 7. a4 Ba7 8. Re1 d6 9. h3 b5 $5 {An active move, first played in Shankland-Tari, 2017.} ({ Routine is} 9... Ne7 {played by Nakamura at least five times. Also, Carlsen, Karjakin and Leko tried their hand at it.}) 10. Bb3 b4 11. a5 Rb8 12. Nbd2 Be6 {[#]} 13. Bxe6 $6 {I'm far from being an expert on this structure, but it seems to be White shouldn't take on e6 unless he can immediately follow up with d3-d4.} ({In the above mentioned game Sam played} 13. Bc4) 13... fxe6 14. Nc4 Qe8 15. Be3 (15. d4 Qg6 16. dxe5 {fails to} Nxe4 $1) 15... Bxe3 16. Rxe3 Qg6 17. Ncd2 Nh5 18. Qf1 Rb5 19. Kh2 Qh6 20. Kg1 Qg6 21. Kh2 Qh6 22. Kg1 Kh8 { Levon says no to Dmitry's silent draw offer.} 23. d4 Nf4 24. h4 {[#]Move of the Day coming up.} g5 $3 {Directed against White's intended g2-g3, but how does one come up with such an idea. Simply put, Aronian is a genius.} 25. hxg5 Qh5 26. Qc4 (26. c4 Rbb8 27. dxe5 (27. d5 Nd4) 27... dxe5 28. g3 Nh3+ 29. Kg2 Rbd8 30. Rd1 Qg4 {puts White under considerable pressure.}) 26... exd4 27. cxd4 Nxa5 {Action all over the board.} 28. Qf1 {Jakovenko is not exactly brimming with confidence these days. Lots or rating points have been lost since his glory days of finishing third in the Grand Prix cycle two years ago.} ({ Perhaps, Dmitry could have survived} 28. Qxc7 Rxg5 29. Nxg5 Qxg5 {based on} 30. Rg3 Ne2+ 31. Kh2 Nxg3 32. fxg3 Qxd2 33. Rxa5 {and the open black king keeps Rf8 from joining the party.}) 28... h6 29. e5 d5 30. Rc1 c6 {[#]} 31. Ne1 $2 { More backward moves.} ({While} 31. gxh6 Rg8 32. g3 Rb7 33. Nh2 Rh7 {is indeed, bad for White,}) ({the right move,} 31. g6 $1 Rg8 32. Nh2 Qxg6 33. g3 {keeps him fighting on equal terms.}) 31... hxg5 32. Nd3 g4 33. Nxf4 Rxf4 34. Rd3 g3 $6 {Levon overdid it a bit.} ({There was no need for fireworks, when} 34... Rb7 35. g3 Rh7 {was there. After} 36. Qg2 {Black has a killer shot in} Qf5 37. Qf1 Rxf2 38. Qxf2 Rh1+) 35. Rxg3 Rh4 36. f4 Rh1+ 37. Kf2 Rxf1+ 38. Rxf1 {Suddenly it transpires Black is going to lose his queen back.} Nc4 {[#]} 39. Nb3 ({ The rook endgame after} 39. Nxc4 dxc4 40. Rh3 Qxh3 41. gxh3 c3 {is no picnic for White, but he can fight on with} 42. b3 $1 (42. Ke2 b3 43. Kd3 ({no time for} 43. bxc3 b2 44. Rb1 a5 45. Kd2 a4 46. Kc2 a3 $19) 43... c2 44. Kc3 a5 45. h4 a4 {has this hopeless look of gloom and doom.}) 42... a5 43. Ke3 Rd5 44. f5 exf5 45. Rxf5 Kg7 46. Rf1 c5 {is probably winning for Black though.}) 39... Qh4 40. Kf3 a5 41. Ra1 Qh5+ 42. Kf2 Nxb2 43. Rh3 (43. Nxa5 Nd1+ 44. Kg1 Qe2 { blocks the other white rook form ever reaching h1.}) 43... Qxh3 44. gxh3 a4 { It's over.} 45. Nc5 b3 46. f5 exf5 47. e6 Nc4 48. e7 Nd6 49. Nxa4 Kg7 50. Nc3 Rb8 51. Ra6 Kf7 0-1

Another heavyweight, Alexander Grischuk, kept pace by giving a clinical performance in the following game, which I'm sure will delight the fans of the Classical Ruy Lopez.

Richard Rapport used an antiquated method to defend the Closed Ruy, and was shown by Grischuk why it had fallen into disuse

Alexander Grischuk - Richard Rapport

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.07"] [Round "2"] [White "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Black "Rapport, Richard"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C97"] [WhiteElo "2761"] [BlackElo "2694"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "125"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3 O-O 9. h3 Na5 10. Bc2 c5 11. d4 Qc7 12. d5 Nc4 13. b3 Nb6 14. a4 Bd7 15. a5 Nc8 16. c4 b4 17. Nbd2 Bd8 18. Nf1 Kh8 19. Ra2 Qb8 20. Be3 Ne7 21. Ng3 Qc8 22. Nh4 Neg8 23. Rf1 Ne8 24. Nf3 Bf6 25. Nh2 Ne7 26. Nh5 Ng6 27. Bb1 Qd8 28. Qc1 Kg8 29. Kh1 Bh4 {[#] Classic positional battles in the Closed Ruy Lopez often come to a head when White finally pushes f2-f4.} 30. f4 {Right here, right now.} exf4 31. Nxf4 Ne5 32. Nd3 $1 Nxd3 33. Bxd3 Nf6 {Rapport is seeking activity - perhaps a misdirected approach in such positions.} ({The thematic} 33... Bg3 { keeps an eye on the key e5-square.} 34. Bf4 $1 (34. Bf2 Be5 35. Nf3 f6 { is what Black has to be content with.}) 34... Bxf4 35. Qxf4 Qf6 36. Qg3 Qe5 37. Qh4 {White is better here, no doubt about that.}) 34. Bf4 (34. Rf3 Nh5 35. g4 Nf6 36. Bf4 Ne8 37. e5 {would be more clinical.}) 34... Nh5 $1 35. Bxd6 Ng3+ 36. Bxg3 Bxg3 37. Nf3 Qc7 38. Re2 f6 {[#] It seems Black might succeed in holding his dark square blockade, but Grischuk's next move cuts to the chase.} 39. e5 $3 Bxe5 40. Qc2 h6 41. Bh7+ Kh8 42. Bf5 {Strategically speaking, the battle has been decided, but White still has to be accurate putting the game away.} Be8 43. Nxe5 fxe5 44. Rfe1 Qxa5 45. Rxe5 Qc7 46. Qd2 Qd6 47. Re6 Qg3 48. Rxh6+ Kg8 49. Bh7+ Kh8 50. Bf5+ Kg8 51. Bh7+ Kh8 52. Be4+ Kg8 53. d6 $1 Ra7 54. Re6 Raf7 55. Kg1 Rf2 56. Qd1 Bf7 57. Bd5 g6 58. R6e3 Qg5 59. Bf3 Ra2 60. d7 Rd8 61. Re8+ Kg7 62. Rxd8 Qxd8 63. Qd6 {I don't know what makes this dated system of defending the Ruy Lopez attractive to Richard, but games like this can make anybody look bad. See Deep Blue-Kasparov (Game 2), 1997 or Anand-Carlsen, Norway Chess 2015 among numerous examples. There's simply no way a player of Grischuk's level would let Black get away with this.} 1-0

Not to be outdone, the Grand Prix leader, Shakhriar Mamedyarov got on the board as well.

Shakhiryar Mamedyarov - Ernesto Inarkiev

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.07"] [Round "2"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Inarkiev, Ernesto"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D30"] [WhiteElo "2800"] [BlackElo "2707"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "39"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 e6 4. Bg5 Bb4+ 5. Nbd2 {Shak specializes in obscure and risky gambit lines of the Queens Gambit Declined.} dxc4 6. e3 ({Main line runs} 6. Qc2 b5 7. a4 c6 8. Bxf6 gxf6 9. g3) 6... b5 7. a4 c6 8. Be2 (8. Qc2 Bb7 9. Be2 Nbd7 10. O-O O-O 11. b3 c3 12. Ne4 h6 13. Bh4 $5 (13. Bxf6 Nxf6 14. Nxc3 $11) 13... g5 14. Nxf6+ Nxf6 15. Bg3 c5 {was Nakamura-Morozevich, 2013.}) 8... Nbd7 9. O-O Qb6 10. Qc2 Bb7 11. b3 c3 12. Nb1 c5 13. Nxc3 cxd4 14. Nxb5 Rc8 (14... O-O {seems more natural.}) 15. Qb2 a6 16. a5 $1 Qc5 17. exd4 { Inarkiev played the opening reasonably well and stood to equalize until he chose an unfortunate square for his queen.} Qf5 $2 (17... Qe7 18. Ne5 $5 h6 ( 18... axb5 19. Bxb5) 19. Rfc1 O-O) (17... Qc2 18. Qxc2 Rxc2 19. Bd1 Rc8 20. Bd2 $1 Be7) 18. Bd2 Be7 19. Nc3 {[#]} O-O $4 {One move isn't a relaible indication of bad form, but how does a Super-GM blunder his queen like that?} (19... h6 20. b4 O-O 21. b5 $16) (19... e5 $5) 20. Nh4 1-0

Ernesto Inarkiev recently went public with his displeasure with the last moment decision by the Russian Chess Federation to take him out of the lineup for the World Team Championship. Ernesto mentioned his declining to play in the European Individual Championship in favor of preparing for the World Teams, and the disappointment he felt when it didn't happen. Inarkiev admitted that his sub-par play in the Moscow Grand Prix might have contributed to this unfortunate turn of events, and said he was looking forward to rebounding in Geneva.

All that sounded quite reasonable, but seeing how his replacement, Vladimir Fedoseev, played in the above mentioned tournaments – gaining 23.3 rating points in the process – doesn't offer much support to his case. Neither does what Inarkiev did today. Chess can be ruthless sometimes.

No doubt, this is how Hou Yifan feels today, as she came ever so close to winning today.

Hou Yifan was just one step away from winning her game

Hou Yifan - Alexander Riazantsev

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.07"] [Round "2"] [White "Hou, Yifan"] [Black "Riazantsev, Alexander"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D31"] [WhiteElo "2666"] [BlackElo "2654"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "91"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 Be7 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bf4 c6 6. e3 Bd6 7. Bg3 Ne7 8. Bd3 Bf5 9. Nge2 O-O 10. a3 a5 11. Rc1 Bxd3 12. Qxd3 Na6 13. Na4 Nc8 14. Nc5 Qe7 15. Qc3 Ra7 16. O-O Nc7 17. Nf4 Bxf4 18. Bxf4 Ne6 19. Bb8 Ra8 20. Bg3 Nb6 21. a4 Rfe8 22. b3 Nxc5 23. dxc5 Nd7 24. Rfe1 Nf8 25. h3 f6 26. Re2 Qf7 27. Rb2 Ng6 28. b4 axb4 29. Rxb4 Ne5 30. Rcb1 Re7 31. e4 Rd8 32. Rd1 h6 33. Qb3 Red7 34. exd5 cxd5 35. Rb1 Nc4 36. Rxb7 Nd2 37. Qb6 Nxb1 38. c6 Nc3 39. cxd7 Rxd7 40. Rxd7 Qxd7 41. a5 d4 42. a6 d3 {[#] A good, consistent game from Hou up to this point.} 43. Qb3+ $2 {A bad mistake, throwing away the win. Keep in mind, this was played after the time control. With this move, she loses her a-pawn and advantage.} (43. a7 d2 44. a8=Q+ Kh7 45. Qbb8 d1=Q+ 46. Kh2 Q1d5 {is just equal,}) ({but} 43. Bf4 $1 {would crown her efforts:} Nb5 (43... Ne2+ 44. Kh2 Nxf4 45. a7 d2 46. a8=Q+ Kh7 47. Qb1+ f5 48. Qf3 {etc.}) 44. Qb7 Qf5 45. Be3 { winning the knight and the game.}) 43... Kh8 44. a7 Ne2+ 45. Kh2 Qxa7 46. Qxd3 1/2-1/2

So, the race is on. Already we have six players with a plus score, soon to be joined by other contenders. I expect quite a line of separation between stronger and more ambitious players and the also-runs to dominate the course of events in Geneva. There's no way a mere +3 is going to win this one.

Standings after two rounds

Rk
SNo
 
Name
FED
Rtg
Pts
1 12 GM Radjabov Teimour AZE 2724 2,0
2 1 GM Aronian Levon ARM 2809 1,5
  2 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar AZE 2800 1,5
  4 GM Grischuk Alexander RUS 2761 1,5
  8 GM Harikrishna Pentala IND 2737 1,5
  9 GM Adams Michael ENG 2736 1,5
7 3 GM Giri Anish NED 2775 1,0
  5 GM Svidler Peter RUS 2749 1,0
  6 GM Nepomniachtchi Ian RUS 2742 1,0
  7 GM Eljanov Pavel UKR 2739 1,0
  10 GM Li Chao B CHN 2735 1,0
  11 GM Gelfand Boris ISR 2728 1,0
13 13 GM Inarkiev Ernesto RUS 2707 0,5
  14 GM Jakovenko Dmitry RUS 2703 0,5
  15 GM Rapport Richard HUN 2694 0,5
  16 GM Hou Yifan CHN 2666 0,5
  17 GM Riazantsev Alexander RUS 2654 0,5
18 18 GM Salem A.R. Saleh UAE 2638 0,0

Links

You can use ChessBase 14 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs to replay the games in PGN. You can also download our free Playchess client, which will in addition give you immediate access to the chess server Playchess.com.



Yermo is enjoying his fifties. Lives in South Dakota, 600 miles way from the nearest grandmaster. Between his chess work online he plays snooker and spends time outdoors - happy as a clam.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Discuss

Rules for reader comments

 
 

Not registered yet? Register

Petrarlsen Petrarlsen 7/9/2017 06:07
@ Aighearach : Personally, I don't much like the term "Super-GM", because its meaning isn't very clear. But, assuming that such a vocabulary would be used, a possibility could be to call 2600+ GMs "strong GMs" and 2700+ GMs "Super-GMs" (and I don't know how 2800+ GMs would be called with this system : "Maxi-GMs ???...). With this system, as Inarkiev is 2707 for now (...but if he continues to make such generous "gifts" to his opponents, he will probably not stay for very long at this level...), he is a "Super-GM". But, one more time, I don't like this term !...
Aighearach Aighearach 7/8/2017 11:59
The answer to the question in the analysis is that Inarkiev isn't a Super-GM, he's just a strong GM.
Grimmell73 Grimmell73 7/8/2017 08:47
I actually don't care if more wins means worse-quality chess. If I want to watch high-quality chess I'll watch no FIDE tournament. I'll buy Houdini and Komodo and let them play each other.
conillet conillet 7/8/2017 08:27
A high number of "decided" games may be more fun for the fans, but it is not indicative of better quality chess. Actually, rather the contrary: There are no wins without mistakes by the opponent.
fons fons 7/8/2017 05:31
Maybe we have our explanation of the many draws in the earlier events: too much calculation, players hedging their bets unwilling to risk too much for fear of jeopardizing placement in the overall standings. As the cycle progresses awaiting developments becomes useless: points need to be scored.
Exabachay Exabachay 7/8/2017 12:46
Great report again by GM Yermolinsky and also great decision to not go into the politics of the situation; we have heard enough whining already, we just want analysis of good chess games; that's all.
1