Chennai G7: A toothless draw

by Albert Silver
11/18/2013 – After the loss in game six, many speculated on what Anand might do to shake things up and prepare a Rambo mission against Carlsen’s king. Some hoped for a King's Gambit, while others suggested a Scotch. When White repeated the same Anti-Berlin line from Game six, the question was what he had found to insist on this. The answer was nothing as Carlsen equalized with ease and drew on move 32. Round seven report.

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FIDE World Chess Championship Anand-Carlsen 2013

The FIDE World Chess Championship match between defending champion Viswanathan Anand and his challenger world number one Magnus Carlsen is taking place from November 9 to 28 2013 in the the Hyatt Regency, Chennai, India. The match is over twelve games, with time controls of 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move starting from move 61. The games start at 3:00 p.m. Indian Time, which is 4:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (New York), 10:30h Central European Time (Paris), 1:30 p.m. Moscow Standard Time. Find your local time here.

Round seven report

After his loss in game six, facing a two point deficit and only six games left to try to make up for it, the general consensus was that the world champion would have to change tactics, and get ready to take his chances. Some fans felt that perhaps damage control was needed, and it was better to avoid finding himself with a three point deficit. However, it is too late for that, and there is a football adage in Brazil that states that losing by ten goals or by a thousand is much the same. In other words, if you have nothing to lose, then the score stops being a factor in your decision making.

Anand arrived first as in the previous games, and appears relaxed

Carlsen arrives and they shake hands for the hard battle ahead. At least, that
is what many expected.

Most grandmasters felt the time was already on him, and with a white to look forward to in game seven, the stars were aligned for a Rambo mission against Carlsen’s king. What would it be? A juicy King’s Gambit? Realistically, it did not seem likely, but one could always hope. More serious speculations were the Scotch, though anything that kept the pieces on the board, maximizing a gung-ho battle, would do just as well. When the same opening as game six appeared, the 4.d3 Anti-Berlin, the experts were left scratching their heads a bit. What did he have in store? Had he (or his seconds) found something to revitalize his fight against Carlsen’s Berlin?

 

What Anand's fans had hoped to see him do in game seven

The answer was sadly a very loud no. In no time at all, seemingly without any threat, Carlsen had equalized, and had at least as many chances as his opponent. It did not take long for the heavy pieces to come off, and a draw was agreed on at move 32. For Carlsen, it was a perfectly happy result as he played Black and had neutralized any possible ambitions by the world champion. Still, the question is: what will Anand prepare for the final games to make a fight of it? To quote Yasser Seirawan commenting on Playchess: if you are going to make chicken salad, don’t forget the chicken.

[Event "FWCM 2013"] [Site "Chennai"] [Date "2013.11.18"] [Round "7"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C65"] [WhiteElo "2775"] [BlackElo "2870"] [Annotator "Robot 4"] [PlyCount "64"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] [TimeControl "40/7200:20/3600:900+30"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. Bxc6 dxc6 6. Nbd2 Bg4 7. h3 Bh5 8. Nf1 Nd7 9. Ng3 Bxf3 10. Qxf3 g6 11. Be3 Qe7 12. O-O-O O-O-O 13. Ne2 Rhe8 14. Kb1 b6 15. h4 Kb7 16. h5 Bxe3 17. Qxe3 Nc5 18. hxg6 hxg6 19. g3 a5 20. Rh7 Rh8 21. Rdh1 Rxh7 22. Rxh7 Qf6 23. f4 Rh8 24. Rxh8 Qxh8 25. fxe5 Qxe5 26. Qf3 f5 27. exf5 gxf5 28. c3 Ne6 29. Kc2 Ng5 30. Qf2 Ne6 31. Qf3 Ng5 32. Qf2 Ne6 1/2-1/2

For those who are already considering the match a forgone conclusion, know that it is not by any means. If Anand wins one of the next two games, it will not only place him within one point, but will put enormous pressure on Carlsen to protect his lead, and nerves may become a serious factor.

Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
Perf.
V. Anand 2775
½
½
½
½
0
0
½
         
2.5
2768
M. Carlsen 2870
½
½
½
½
1
1
½
         
4.5
2877

Tournament details

Schedule: the match will be played over a maximum of twelve games, and the winner of the match will be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the winner scores 6.5 points in less than 12 games then the closing ceremony will take place on the day after the World Championship has been decided or one day thereafter.

07 November 2013 – Opening Ceremony
09 November 2013 – Game 1
10 November 2013 – Game 2
11 November 2013 – Rest Day
12 November 2013 – Game 3
13 November 2013 – Game 4
14 November 2013 – Rest Day
15 November 2013 – Game 5
16 November 2013 – Game 6
17 November 2013 – Rest Day
18 November 2013 – Game 7
19 November 2013 – Game 8
20 November 2013 – Rest Day
21 November 2013 – Game 9
22 November 2013 – Game 10
23 November 2013 – Rest Day
24 November 2013 – Game 11
25 November 2013 – Rest Day
26 November 2013 – Game 12
27 November 2013 – Rest Day
28 November 2013 – Tiebreak games
29 November 2013 – Closing Ceremony

Live commentary on Playchess in English

Day
Round
Live Playchess commentary in English
Nov. 19
8
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward
Nov. 21
9
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 22
10
GM Daniel King + GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
Nov. 24
11
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 26
12
GM Chris Ward + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 28
Tiebreak
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward

Live commentary in other languages

Day
Round
French German Spanish
Nov. 19
8
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 21
9
GM M. Vachier-Lagrave GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 22
10
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 24
11
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 26
12
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 28
TB
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García

The commentary will commence around 30 minutes after the start of the games. The schedule and commentators may be changed before the start of the Championship on November 9th, with long and short castlings possible.

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site, with special coverage on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.



Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
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