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Chennai G4: Carlsen presses Anand in epic battle

11/13/2013 – Another fantastic battle, and the odd trend of trouble for White persists. In game four, Magnus Carlsen played his pet Berlin and it was a resounding success as Vishy Anand floundered and then lost a pawn. The story was a repeat of game three, with Black sporting a large advantage, pressing to win, but unable to deliver the killing blow. Despite Carlsen’s efforts, Anand saved the game. Large illustrated report.
 

FIDE World Chess Championship Anand-Carlsen 2013

The FIDE World Chess Championship match between defending champion Viswanathan Anand and his challenger world number one Magnus Carlsen is taking place from November 9 to 28 2013 in the the Hyatt Regency, Chennai, India. The match is over twelve games, with time controls of 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move starting from move 61. The games start at 3:00 p.m. Indian Time, which is 4:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (New York), 10:30h Central European Time (Paris), 1:30 p.m. Moscow Standard Time. Find your local time here.

Round four report

To describe today’s game as epic, is not hyperbole, but mere fact. After two lackadaisical games lacking in action, game three was a significant wake-up call as the game went south for the challenger and an increasingly exciting battle built up. Game four was much the same, but more so.

The game started with 1.e4 once more by Anand, but that is where the common ground with game two ended. Carlsen played 1…e5 and within minutes the two players had rattled off a dozen moves in a Ruy Lopez Berlin. This choice was not met with much enthusiasm by the viewers, both online and live, and many were predicting either a quick draw, or a game that was dull as nails. Even though this opening choice could hardly be considered a complete surprise since Magnus had already played it on numerous occasions, the world champion seemed completely unprepared and his position soon became critical.

On move 18 a lone pawn on a2 was in the scope of the Norwegian’s bishop, described by many as a mirror of Fischer’s fateful temptation from his first game against Spassky in 1972, and he went into a deep and long think. Many speculated taking was unwise, while Playchess commentators of the day, Yasser Seirawan and Alejandro Ramirez, could not see what would save White if it was taken. Sure enough, Black snapped off the pawn, and suddenly it was clear something had gone very wrong.

The incredibly sharp complications were as mindboggling to the players as they
were to the spectators

Grandmaster Yasser Seirawan and Alejandro Ramirez gave exemplary commentary, showing
endless erudition and imagination, as they explored all the possibilities of the exciting game

How right he was!

A worried Anand calculates heavily as he glances at his opponent

Many expected this to signal the first win for the world number one, but instead Vishy Anand undertook heroic measures and found inspired resources as he threw obstacle after obstacle at Black, until even the young challenger stumbled. After Black played 37…Rf8, Anand perked up as Carlsen got up confidently and walked off. One could see a distinct change in his posture and when Magnus he came back a minute later and sat down, Vishy played the unexpected blow 38.Nd4! throwing the evaluation of the position into chaos.

As the realization of what had happened sank in, Magnus could be seen
mouthing what looked like less than polite words. They could have been
prayers to Caissa, but we sort of doubt it.

His body language changed and it was clear he was not at all happy anymore.
The contrast with Anand’s says it all.

There was nothing to be done now, and by the time the time control had been reached a few moves later, the general opinion was that the worst had passed.

The minute the time control had been made, both players felt the need to take
a breather and get their emotions back under control

This was not to say it was over, and the young challenger redoubled his efforts to try to find the advantage he had enjoyed for most of the game, but the champion was back in control of his position, and he never let go.

Magnus Carlsen plays 54...Ka6 still pushing to the bitter end

When the final moves were played, more as a matter of principle, than because of anything left to try, Anand could be seen sighing in relief, and ecstatic players, fans, and journalists could not stop gushing over the fantastic game they had just witnessed.

Whew!!

[Event "FWCM 2013"] [Site "Chennai"] [Date "2013.11.13"] [Round "4"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C67"] [WhiteElo "2775"] [BlackElo "2870"] [PlyCount "127"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] [TimeControl "40/7200:20/3600:900+30"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Bd7 10. Rd1 Be7 11. Nc3 Kc8 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Rd2 c5 15. Rad1 Be6 16. Ne1 Ng6 17. Nd3 b6 18. Ne2 Bxa2 19. b3 c4 20. Ndc1 cxb3 21. cxb3 Bb1 22. f4 Kb7 23. Nc3 Bf5 24. g4 Bc8 25. Nd3 h5 26. f5 Ne7 27. Nb5 hxg4 28. hxg4 Rh4 29. Nf2 Nc6 30. Rc2 a5 31. Rc4 g6 32. Rdc1 Bd7 33. e6 fxe6 34. fxe6 Be8 35. Ne4 Rxg4+ 36. Kf2 Rf4+ 37. Ke3 Rf8 38. Nd4 Nxd4 39. Rxc7+ Ka6 40. Kxd4 Rd8+ 41. Kc3 Rf3+ 42. Kb2 Re3 43. Rc8 Rdd3 44. Ra8+ Kb7 45. Rxe8 Rxe4 46. e7 Rg3 47. Rc3 Re2+ 48. Rc2 Ree3 49. Ka2 g5 50. Rd2 Re5 51. Rd7+ Kc6 52. Red8 Rge3 53. Rd6+ Kb7 54. R8d7+ Ka6 55. Rd5 Re2+ 56. Ka3 Re6 57. Rd8 g4 58. Rg5 Rxe7 59. Ra8+ Kb7 60. Rag8 a4 61. Rxg4 axb3 62. R8g7 Ka6 63. Rxe7 Rxe7 64. Kxb3 1/2-1/2

The two go over the key moments as they get up from their great battle

Even in the press conference, rather than questions one journalist could only
congratulate the players for their performance and thanked them

In the press conference, Vishy Anand admitted, "Something went horribly wrong with the opening. I made one illogical move after the next." While Carlsen, slightly disappointed, said, "When I won the pawn, I was very optimistic. He kept finding resources, I was missing some little things. He just fought on really well. It's a bit of a pity to have spoiled such a good position, but it was a very good fight, so I'm not really too unhappy."

Players and fans all over were deeply enthusiastic, from Garry Kasparov, to Nigel Short, and innumerous others.

Garry Kasparov also noted that this was further proof the Berlin has been deeply maligned.

The full video of the game

This is the first part of the high-resolution video transmission

 

The second part of the video transmission. The press conference starts at 1:24:00

Game five is on Friday. Tomorrow is a rest day.

Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
Perf.
V. Anand 2775
½
½
½
½
               
2.0
2870
M. Carlsen 2870
½
½
½
½
               
2.0
2775

Tournament details

Schedule: the match will be played over a maximum of twelve games, and the winner of the match will be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the winner scores 6.5 points in less than 12 games then the closing ceremony will take place on the day after the World Championship has been decided or one day thereafter.

07 November 2013 – Opening Ceremony
09 November 2013 – Game 1
10 November 2013 – Game 2
11 November 2013 – Rest Day
12 November 2013 – Game 3
13 November 2013 – Game 4
14 November 2013 – Rest Day
15 November 2013 – Game 5
16 November 2013 – Game 6
17 November 2013 – Rest Day
18 November 2013 – Game 7
19 November 2013 – Game 8
20 November 2013 – Rest Day
21 November 2013 – Game 9
22 November 2013 – Game 10
23 November 2013 – Rest Day
24 November 2013 – Game 11
25 November 2013 – Rest Day
26 November 2013 – Game 12
27 November 2013 – Rest Day
28 November 2013 – Tiebreak games
29 November 2013 – Closing Ceremony

Live commentary on Playchess in English

Day
Round
Live Playchess commentary in English
Nov. 15
5
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 16
6
GM Daniel King + GM GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 18
7
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 19
8
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward
Nov. 21
9
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 22
10
GM Daniel King + GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
Nov. 24
11
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 26
12
GM Chris Ward + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 28
Tiebreak
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward

Live commentary in other languages

Day
Round
French German Spanish
Nov. 15
5
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 16
6
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 18
7
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 19
8
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 21
9
GM M. Vachier-Lagrave GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 22
10
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 24
11
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 26
12
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 28
TB
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García

The commentary will commence around 30 minutes after the start of the games. The schedule and commentators may be changed before the start of the Championship on November 9th, with long and short castlings possible.

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site, with special coverage on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.

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See also

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