Chennai G2: More moves, but quicker draw

by Albert Silver
11/10/2013 – It had the promise of an exciting fight, after a sharp Caro-Kann appeared with castling on opposite wings. Then at a crucial juncture, the queens were traded and the position’s tension vanished in a puff of smoke. Though not the first world championship match to have a slow start, with both players still prodding and studying each other, the fans were hoping for more. Illustrated report with video analysis.

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FIDE World Chess Championship Anand-Carlsen 2013

The FIDE World Chess Championship match between defending champion Viswanathan Anand and his challenger world number one Magnus Carlsen is taking place from November 9 to 28 2013 in the the Hyatt Regency, Chennai, India. The match is over twelve games, with time controls of 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move starting from move 61. The games start at 3:00 p.m. Indian Time, which is 4:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (New York), 10:30h Central European Time (Paris), 1:30 p.m. Moscow Standard Time. Find your local time here.

Round two report

The second game of the world title match was once again more of a revelatory experience than a gloves-off fisticuffs on the board.

The Hyatt has done more than arrange a great location. They are completely in character.

Outside one can see water fountains with chess surroundings

The organization continues to be superb and worthy of the event’s magnitude, as things seem to be going like clockwork. Jorge Vega was in the crowd, as was Andrew Paulson. Unlike yesterday though, there was no sign of Geoffrey Borg, Nigel Freeman, or Kirsan nearby throughout the game. Earlier in the day, Geoffrey could be seen buzzing around - no question, he's a perfectionist that wants to ensure everything is a clean, crisp production. As before, the players were sequestered just off-stage. Anand looked much the same as he has throughout, while Carlen was seated next to him, leaning back to slouch in his chair. Confident and comfortable, but demonstrating poor posture. The joys of youth.

In the first game, there was quite a bit of online chatter questioning whether the two players had shaken hands before the game. This was because they shook hands once before, and then exited the stage again, causing a bit of confusion. Today there was no such misunderstanding, and Anastasiya Karlovich, the FIDE press officer, and official site photographer, was quick to post a picture of their second round handshake on Twitter.

To quell rumors of bad blood, Anastasiya Karlovich, the press officer, posted
this on Twitter

When the world champion opened the game with 1.e4, there were audible cheers from the audience, and within 20 minutes over a dozen moves of a sharp Caro-Kann variation had been played with opposite side castling. The fans were all enthusiastic as were the live commentators, until a crucial juncture appeared allowing White to determine the nature of the rest of the game: he could play Qg4 and go for a sharp double-edged continuation, or he could exchange queens with Qxd5 and enter a calm endgame. If you read the title, there is no need for a crystal ball to guess what happened. Groans of dismay were heard on the English commentary in Playchess by both GM Daniel King and Yasser Seirawan, no doubt echoed in the playing hall among the spectators.

The game pursued its course, but the blood had been squeezed out of it and even the promises for a long struggle seemed half-hearted at best. By move 22 a repetition was on the board and the players did not try to overdramatize it as they quickly played it out and shook hands. The game might have taken nine more moves than round one, but it ended in less than an hour, compared to the 90 minutes the day before. More moves, but a quicker end.

A disappointing result for the fans, but not necessarily for the players. Vishy
neutralized Carlsen's preparation, while Carlsen drew with black with no danger.

[Event "FWCM 2013"] [Site "Chennai"] [Date "2013.11.10"] [Round "2"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B19"] [WhiteElo "2775"] [BlackElo "2870"] [PlyCount "50"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] [TimeControl "40/7200:20/3600:900+30"] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. h4 h6 7. Nf3 e6 8. Ne5 Bh7 9. Bd3 Bxd3 10. Qxd3 Nd7 11. f4 Bb4+ 12. c3 Be7 13. Bd2 Ngf6 14. O-O-O O-O 15. Ne4 Nxe4 16. Qxe4 Nxe5 17. fxe5 Qd5 18. Qxd5 cxd5 19. h5 b5 20. Rh3 a5 21. Rf1 Rac8 22. Rg3 Kh7 23. Rgf3 Kg8 24. Rg3 Kh7 25. Rgf3 Kg8 1/2-1/2

IM Andrew Martin game two commentary

In the press conference, both players defended their decisions. Vishy noted that it was clear he had entered extensive preparation by Magnus, and having studied the line himself, knowing just how sharp and dangerous it was, preferred to not get into trouble. Asked why he did not opt for the shaper continuation at the key crossroads, Anand explained, “I did not see any promising continuation and did not want to walk into a blind alley.”

Magnus Carlsen agreed that so far not much had happened in the match

From a chess and match point of view, it is perfectly understandable, and former world champion Garry Kasparov Tweeted:

For fans though, especially those footing the hefty $40 entrance ticket (a fortune in India) to watch the games live, it has to be singularly frustrating. If one buys an expensive ticket to a boxing match, and one of the fighters is knocked out in a minute, though one might feel regret it ended so quickly, there will still be a sense of closure. Not here.  

On a final note, here is a spectacular picture by fans of Magnus Carlsen posted on Twitter.

On the front, we are told by confidential sources, it reads A-NA-N-D! (picture by Amalie_dehli)

Game three is on Tuesday as Monday is a rest day.

Report by Albert Silver and Michael von Keitz

Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
Perf.
V. Anand 2775
½
½
                   
1.0
2870
M. Carlsen 2870
½
½
                   
1.0
2775

Tournament details

Schedule: the match will be played over a maximum of twelve games, and the winner of the match will be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the winner scores 6.5 points in less than 12 games then the closing ceremony will take place on the day after the World Championship has been decided or one day thereafter.

07 November 2013 – Opening Ceremony
09 November 2013 – Game 1
10 November 2013 – Game 2
11 November 2013 – Rest Day
12 November 2013 – Game 3
13 November 2013 – Game 4
14 November 2013 – Rest Day
15 November 2013 – Game 5
16 November 2013 – Game 6
17 November 2013 – Rest Day
18 November 2013 – Game 7
19 November 2013 – Game 8
20 November 2013 – Rest Day
21 November 2013 – Game 9
22 November 2013 – Game 10
23 November 2013 – Rest Day
24 November 2013 – Game 11
25 November 2013 – Rest Day
26 November 2013 – Game 12
27 November 2013 – Rest Day
28 November 2013 – Tiebreak games
29 November 2013 – Closing Ceremony

Live commentary on Playchess in English

Day
Round
Live Playchess commentary in English
Nov. 10
2
GM Daniel King + GM Yasser Seirawan
Nov. 12
3
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 13
4
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 15
5
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 16
6
GM Daniel King + GM GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 18
7
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 19
8
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward
Nov. 21
9
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 22
10
GM Daniel King + GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
Nov. 24
11
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 26
12
GM Chris Ward + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 28
Tiebreak
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward

Live commentary in other languages

Day
Round
French German Spanish
Nov. 10
2
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 12
3
GM Christian Bauer GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 13
4
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 15
5
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 16
6
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 18
7
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 19
8
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 21
9
GM M. Vachier-Lagrave GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 22
10
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 24
11
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 26
12
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 28
TB
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García

The commentary will commence around 30 minutes after the start of the games. The schedule and commentators may be changed before the start of the Championship on November 9th, with long and short castlings possible.

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site, with special coverage on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.



Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
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