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Chennai Final: Magnus Victorious

11/22/2013 – The game was well described by Vishy Anand: "a microcosm of what the match was". Anand played a solid game while keeping tension, but he started making mistakes. A blunder by each player led them to an endgame with an advantage for Carlsen. He tried to win the knight endgame but forced a draw when things got complicated. Analysis of the game that made Magnus Carlsen the new World Champion.
 

FIDE World Chess Championship Anand-Carlsen 2013

The FIDE World Chess Championship match between defending champion Viswanathan Anand and his challenger world number one Magnus Carlsen is taking place from November 9 to 28 2013 in the the Hyatt Regency, Chennai, India. The match is over twelve games, with time controls of 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move starting from move 61. The games start at 3:00 p.m. Indian Time, which is 4:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (New York), 10:30h Central European Time (Paris), 1:30 p.m. Moscow Standard Time. Find your local time here.

Round ten video by GM Daniel King

Final round report by Alejandro Ramirez

And it is all over. Magnus Carlsen showed that he was simply the better player in this match and convincingly won with a score of 6.5-3.5. There is no way to sugarcoat it, the match was indeed one sided. Only once was Carlsen in any problems, in game 3. As soon as he got his groove and played his game he was simply untouchable.

One final scan

Anand put up a good fight, but he was simply outclassed

Anand attributes a lot to his tough loss on game five, and how can he not? He wanted to not be scared of playing Carlsen in long games, and suddenly this happened.

Today's game was a typical game for the match. Carlsen pushed, pushed, and Anand blundered. Unlike most of the games though Carlsen didn't capitalize on his opponent's mistake this time, however a draw was after all more than sufficient.

Magnus was in no mood to keep a lot of pieces on the board

The final game, fully analyzed:

[Event "FWCM 2013"] [Site "Chennai"] [Date "2013.11.22"] [Round "10"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B51"] [WhiteElo "2870"] [BlackElo "2775"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez, Alejandro"] [PlyCount "130"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] 1. e4 c5 {Anand had mentioned in a previous press conference that if White wanted to keep it dry in the Sicilian it was also possible to do it. However he gives it a try in hopes of creating counterplay.} 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ {Magnus refuses to go for the sharp main lines of what probably would have been a Najdorf. The Bb5+ lines are less prone to becoming double edged.} Nd7 {If you must play for a win, this is the move of choice. Bd7 is a little more solid.} 4. d4 cxd4 5. Qxd4 a6 6. Bxd7+ Bxd7 7. c4 Nf6 8. Bg5 e6 9. Nc3 Be7 10. O-O (10. Rd1 Bc6 11. O-O O-O 12. Qd3 Qc7 13. a4 Rfd8 14. Rfe1 Rac8 15. Nd4 Be8 16. b3 Qc5 17. Be3 Qa5 18. Bd2 Qc5 19. h3 {Was the game between Fressinet-Ponomariov from September earlier this year. Fressinet is (strongly) rumored to be one of Carlsen's seconds.}) 10... Bc6 11. Qd3 O-O 12. Nd4 Rc8 13. b3 Qc7 14. Nxc6 Qxc6 {Black doesn't have many serious difficulties, but it isn't clear what exactly he can achieve. On the other hand White is still quite solid.} 15. Rac1 h6 16. Be3 Nd7 {This regrouping is quite normal. Black has an advantage on the dark-squares and he needs to exploit this and combine it wit ha break, either d5 or b5, to create counterplay.} 17. Bd4 Rfd8 18. h3 Qc7 19. Rfd1 Qa5 20. Qd2 Kf8 21. Qb2 Kg8 {These last two moves may not make too much sense, but it's hard to suggest something active for Black. He is just waiting for the correct time to counterattack. The question would be what happens if White doesn't do anything.} 22. a4 Qh5 23. Ne2 Bf6 24. Rc3 Bxd4 25. Rxd4 Qe5 26. Qd2 Nf6 27. Re3 Rd7 28. a5 {White's even manged to put a little squeeze on Black and holds a slight edge.} Qg5 $2 {A difficult to explain blunder.} 29. e5 Ne8 30. exd6 $2 { And a difficult to explain blunder back. Basically any move that kept the tension won:} (30. Nc3 {with the dual idea of Na4 forking everything and Ne4 forking the queen and the pawn on d6.} Qf5 31. Na4 Rc6 32. Nb6 Rd8 33. Re1 { And Black is so tied down it is hard to believe he will survive.}) (30. b4 { preparing an eventual c5 after taking on d6.} Qd8 (30... Rc6 31. c5 d5 32. Rg4 Qe7 33. Reg3 {is going to get Black mated.}) 31. Nc3 {and again the intrusion to b6 is lethal.}) (30. Ng3 {makes very little sense to me compared to Nc3 but is also winning.} Rc6 31. b4 $1 {also looks hopeless.}) 30... Rc6 {Now Black will regain the pawn on d6 without issues and he will be close to equality, though White's pawn majority on the queenside still gives him a pull.} 31. f4 Qd8 32. Red3 Rcxd6 33. Rxd6 Rxd6 34. Rxd6 Qxd6 35. Qxd6 Nxd6 36. Kf2 {Only White can win this endgame. Maybe with perfect play it is a draw though.} Kf8 37. Ke3 Ke7 $6 (37... Nf5+ $1 {I believe this move was superior.} 38. Ke4 Ke7 39. g4 Nd6+ 40. Kd4 f5 {The point is that Black is considerably closer to creating counterplay in this line.}) 38. Kd4 Kd7 39. Kc5 Kc7 {The king is just in time to keep White out of b6, but now he is kind of zugzwanged.} (39... Ne4+ 40. Kb6 Kc8 41. c5 $1 {is not pleasant.}) 40. Nc3 Nf5 41. Ne4 Ne3 42. g3 f5 { Forced basically.} (42... Nf1 {does not make for a happy knight, but it was pretty much the only alternative to the text.}) 43. Nd6 (43. Nd2 $1 {Albert Silver has pointed to this move as being winning. Black's chances lie entirely on counterplay with the knight, but I cannot find a refutation.} Nd1 $1 (43... g5 44. fxg5 hxg5 45. Kd4 Nc2+ 46. Ke5 {should be winning for White as he will have a passed h-pawn very soon.}) 44. Kd4 Nf2 45. h4 Ng4 (45... Nh1 $1 46. Nf1 Nf2 47. b4 Ne4 48. g4 $1 {This is key.} Nd6 $1 {Black must force g5.} (48... Kd6 49. gxf5 (49. c5+ Kd7 50. Ne3 {might be easier and stronger though.}) 49... exf5 50. Ne3 Ke6 51. h5 Nf6 52. b5 {and it looks like White should win this position since h5 is poisoned.}) 49. g5 Ne4 50. gxh6 gxh6 51. Nh2 Nd2 52. Kd3 Nb3 53. Nf3 Nc1+ 54. Kd4 Kd6 55. Ne5 Nb3+ 56. Kc3 Nc1 57. Kd2 Nb3+ 58. Kc2 $1 Nd4+ 59. Kd3 Nb3 60. h5 Nc1+ 61. Ke3 Kc7 62. Nf7 Kd7 63. Nxh6 Ke7 64. Kd4 $18) 46. b4 Kd6 47. b5 $18 {White has too many threats in the queenside and Black's knight is completely out of play.}) 43... g5 44. Ne8+ Kd7 45. Nf6+ Ke7 46. Ng8+ Kf8 47. Nxh6 gxf4 48. gxf4 Kg7 {White's knight is trapped, but he has enough counterplay on the other side of the board to guarantee a draw.} 49. Nxf5+ exf5 50. Kb6 Ng2 51. Kxb7 Nxf4 {The rest is straightforward.} 52. Kxa6 Ne6 53. Kb6 f4 54. a6 f3 55. a7 f2 56. a8=Q f1=Q {The queen can draw against the queen and knight duo as long as the stronger side doesn't have any pawns left. The draw here is trivial for both sides.} 57. Qd5 Qe1 58. Qd6 Qe3+ 59. Ka6 Nc5+ 60. Kb5 Nxb3 61. Qc7+ Kh6 62. Qb6+ Qxb6+ 63. Kxb6 Kh5 64. h4 Kxh4 65. c5 Nxc5 {And Carlsen is the new World Chess Champion} 1/2-1/2

Anand thinking about which opening to play in his last game as World Champion

Anand mentioned that today's game was like a 'microcosm' of the match. He simply played chess and at some point he started making mistakes. He was overall dissapointed with his overall level of play. He was asked what strategy he came with into the match, and he responded that he could have chosen any strategy, that really didn't matter - in his view the game was all about execution. In this year things have not been going well for Anand in terms of execution and it did not go well for him in this match.

Anand will participate in the Candidate's next year and will have a chance to challenge Carlsen if he wins

Carlsen revealed very little during the press conference, and he kept confidential the name of his seconds and of his girlfriend. In his view the match was decided over the board and he simply did not feel any psychological warfare.

Obligatory thrown-in-the-pool celebration picture. (@MagnusCarlsen)

Report by Alejandro Ramirez, photos by Anastasiya Karlovich

Report in Hindi by Niklesh Jain:

कार्लसन बने विश्व शतरंज चैम्पियन

स्थान चेन्नई ,भारत -,मेगनस कार्लसन ,उम्र 23 वर्ष ,शानदार कद काठी ,विश्व के नंबर 1 शतरंज खिलाड़ी ,विश्व भर मे शानदार लोकप्रियता ,खिताब विश्व विजेता !!!

 विश्व शतरंज का परिद्र्श्य बदल चुका है भारत की शान विश्वनाथन आनंद अब पूर्व विश्व विजेता है और नया ताज अब नयी पीढ़ी के प्रतिनिधि मेगनस कार्लसन के पास है जो बने है विश्व शतरंज इतिहास के तीसरे सबसे युवा विश्व शतरंज चैम्पियन ।जैसे ही दसवें राउंड का खेल बराबरी पर छूटा पूरा का पूरा हयात होटल,चेन्नई का प्रांगण तालियो की गड़गड़ाहट मे डूब गया । मौका था विश्व शतरंज के एक नए युग के सिरमौर एक नए विश्व विजेता के आगमन का और साथ ही साथ एक युग की शुरुआत और एक युग के अंत का ।  विश्वनाथन आनंद जो की शायद इस प्रतियोगिता में अपनी अब तक की सबसे खराब लय मे नजर आए जिन्होने पिछले 25 वर्षो से भारत को शीर्ष पर रखा है और दुनिया भर मे देश को सम्मान दिलाया इस बार भले ही उम्र और प्रतिभा के आगे बेबस नजर आए पर वह बेशक खेल के महान खिलाड़ियो में हमेशा के लिए अपना स्थान पहले ही बना चुके है । 

आज आनंद को जंहा खेल में बने रहने के लिए किसी भी कीमत में जीतना जरूरी  था । वंही कार्लसन के लिए कम से कम आधा अंक भी उन्हे विश्व विजेता बनाने के लिए काफी था । और आज कार्लसन ने मैच की शुरुआत की पहली चाल 1.e4 चलकर की और पहली बार आनंद ने इस प्रतियोगिता में  c5 चलते हुए सिसिलियन वेरिएसन में खेल को ले जाने का निर्णय लिया। 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+कार्लसन ने अपनी बेहद पसंदीदा मॉस्को वेरिएसन से खेल को आगे ले जाने का निश्चय किया Nd7 4.d4 cxd4 5.Qxd4 a6 6.Bxd7+ Bxd7 7.c4 Nf6 8.Bg5 e6 9.Nc3 Be7 10.0–0 Bc6 11.Qd3 0–0 12.Nd4 Rc8 13.b3 नावेल्टी के साथ ही खेल एकदम नए मोड़ पर आ गया और Qc7 14.Nxc6 कार्लसन ने आनंद के सफ़ेद खानो के ऊंट को अपने घोड़े से बदलते हुए बाहर करने का निश्चय किया Qxc6 15.Rac1 h6 16.Be3 Nd7 17.Bd4 Rfd8 18.h3 Qc7 19.Rfd1 Qa5 20.Qd2 Kf8 21.Qb2 Kg8 22.a4 Qh5 कार्लसन के किंग्स साइड पर खेली गयी इस चाल से यह साफ था के आज आनंद कार्लसन को आसानी से आधा अंक भी नहीं देना चाहते थे। 23.Ne2 Bf6 24.Rc3 Bxd4 25.Rxd4 इसके साथ ही काले खाने के ऊंट खेल से बाहर थे और Qe5 26.Qd2 Nf6 27.Re3 Rd7 28.a5 Qg5 ? इस गलत चाल से आनंद अचानक खतरे में नजर आने लगे 29.e5 Ne8 30.exd6?!इस गलती के साथ कार्लसन ने आनंद को वापस खेल मे लौटा दिया वो अपने घोड़े को g3 पर ले जाकर खेल को जीत की तरफ सीधे मोड़ सकते थे  Rc6 31.f4!आने वाले मोहरो के बदलाव को भाँपते हुए कार्लसन ने यह चाल अपने राजा को सेंटर की तरफ ले जाने की बढ़िया चाल थी  Qd8 32.Red3 Rcxd6 33.Rxd6 Rxd6 34.Rxd6 Qxd6 35.Qxd6 Nxd6  और अब बोर्ड पर पहली बार माइनर मोहरो का एंडगेम था । 36.Kf2 Kf8 37.Ke3 Ke7 38.Kd4 Kd7 39.Kc5 Kc7 40.Nc3 Nf5 41.Ne4 Ne3 42.g3 f5 43.Nd6 g5 44.Ne8+ Kd7 45.Nf6+ Ke7 46.Ng8+ Kf8 47.Nxh6 gxf4 48.gxf4 Kg7 49.Nxf5+!? कार्लसन ने अपने घोड़े का बलिदान करते हुए अपने शानदार आकलन का परिचय दिया और साथ ही दर्शको में उत्सुकता बढ़ा दी  exf5 50.Kb6 Ng2 51.Kxb7 Nxf4 52.Kxa6 Ne6 53.Kb6 f4 54.a6 f3 55.a7 f2 56.a8Q f1Q 57.Qd5 Qe1 58.Qd6 Qe3+ 59.Ka6 Nc5+ 60.Kb5 Nxb3 61.Qc7+ Kh6 62.Qb6+ Qxb6+ 63.Kxb6 Kh5 64.h4 Kxh4 65.c5 Nxc5 और इसके साथ ही खेल बराबरी पर रुक गया और कार्लसन बन गए विश्व शतरंज चैम्पियन । भारत की महान धरती गवाह बनी शतरंज के एक नए युग की शुरुआत की –कार्लसन युग की शुरुआत की  । आनंद ने मैच के बाद सभी प्रसंसको और देश के लिए संदेश देते हुए एक अच्छा मैच ना खेल पाने के लिए अफसोस व्यक्त किया । वंही कार्लसन ने मेरे पूछे प्रश्न के जबाब में कहा के भारत के वें बहुत आभारी है और उन्हे और उनकी टीम को बहुत बढ़िया तरीके से सुविधाएं दी गई । और उन्होने कहा की तीसरा और चौंथा मैच प्रतियोगिता का सबसे निर्णायक क्षण था । खैर अब विश्वनाथन आनंद विश्व शतरंज चैम्पियन नहीं है , उम्मीद है वह इस झटके से उबरकर जोरदार वापसी करेंगे । देश को गर्व करने के लिए किए गए उनके हर एक प्रदर्शन को हर एक देशवासी सलाम करता है , युवा कार्लसन को बहुत बहुत बधाई और उम्मीद है की वह इस खेल को लोकप्रियता के नए पैमाने पर ले जाएंगे । आप सभी ने मेरे लेखो को पढ़ा और पसंद किया उसके लिए बहुत बहुत धन्यवाद उम्मीद है के आप अपने सुझाव हमे देते रहेंगे और में आपके लिए यूं ही हिन्दी में लिखता रहूँगा .....आपका निकलेश जैन !

Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
Perf.
V. Anand 2775
½
½
½
½
0
0
½
½
0
½
   
3.5
2763
M. Carlsen 2870
½
½
½
½
1
1
½
½
1
½
   
6.5
2882

Tournament details

Schedule: the match will be played over a maximum of twelve games, and the winner of the match will be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the winner scores 6.5 points in less than 12 games then the closing ceremony will take place on the day after the World Championship has been decided or one day thereafter.

07 November 2013 – Opening Ceremony
09 November 2013 – Game 1
10 November 2013 – Game 2
11 November 2013 – Rest Day
12 November 2013 – Game 3
13 November 2013 – Game 4
14 November 2013 – Rest Day
15 November 2013 – Game 5
16 November 2013 – Game 6
17 November 2013 – Rest Day
18 November 2013 – Game 7
19 November 2013 – Game 8
20 November 2013 – Rest Day
21 November 2013 – Game 9
22 November 2013 – Game 10
23 November 2013 – Rest Day
24 November 2013 – Game 11
25 November 2013 – Rest Day
26 November 2013 – Game 12
27 November 2013 – Rest Day
28 November 2013 – Tiebreak games
29 November 2013 – Closing Ceremony

Live commentary on Playchess in English

Day
Round
Live Playchess commentary in English
Nov. 09
1
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 10
2
GM Daniel King + GM Yasser Seirawan
Nov. 12
3
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 13
4
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 15
5
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 16
6
GM Daniel King + GM GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 18
7
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 19
8
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward
Nov. 21
9
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 22
10
GM Daniel King + GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
Nov. 24
11
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 26
12
GM Chris Ward + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 28
Tiebreak
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward

Live commentary in other languages

Day
Round
French German Spanish
Nov. 09
1
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 10
2
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 12
3
GM Christian Bauer GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 13
4
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 15
5
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 16
6
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 18
7
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 19
8
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 21
9
GM M. Vachier-Lagrave GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 22
10
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 24
11
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 26
12
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 28
TB
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García

The commentary will commence around 30 minutes after the start of the games. The schedule and commentators may be changed before the start of the Championship on November 9th, with long and short castlings possible.

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site, with special coverage on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.

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