Chennai 07: Stabilization or Insipidity?

11/18/2013 – The obvious pro-Carlsen view of the round is that an easy draw puts him half a point closer to the World Championship title. However there is something to be said that is favorable to Anand. After two tough losses he managed to simply survive, he has time to stabilize his game and maybe come back with something stronger not in this set of games, but the next. Analysis of today's tame game.

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FIDE World Chess Championship Anand-Carlsen 2013

The FIDE World Chess Championship match between defending champion Viswanathan Anand and his challenger world number one Magnus Carlsen is taking place from November 9 to 28 2013 in the the Hyatt Regency, Chennai, India. The match is over twelve games, with time controls of 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move starting from move 61. The games start at 3:00 p.m. Indian Time, which is 4:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (New York), 10:30h Central European Time (Paris), 1:30 p.m. Moscow Standard Time. Find your local time here.

Round seven video by GM Daniel King

Round seven report by Alejandro Ramirez

Today it just wasn't much of a game. Carlsen came up with this nice little subtlety in a variation that had already been tried several times by both players. The idea of putting the bishop on h5 to provoke the White maneuver Nf1-g3 seems counterintuitive in the Spanish, but it worked rather well in this variation because Black was going to castle long anyways.

I liked what Carlsen did, he had no problems, he didn't have to deal with almost anything. Anand's opening was insipid and he is not in the position where he can afford to waste whites. The opening had a few subtleties, which is important for grandmasters, but the fact is that when Carlsen obtained good development and essentially after he swapped the dark-squared bishops there was very little left in the game.

This man needs a win pretty soon

This one is trying to figure out how many draws will get him a nice new title

Carlsen's Caro-Kann shown on game one shocked Anand, shocked me and the entire chess population, but it is clear that his real preparation was this Berlin type of set-ups.

Friedel's analysis of a dull game seven:

[Event "FWCM 2013"] [Site "Chennai"] [Date "2013.11.18"] [Round "7"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "*"] [ECO "C65"] [WhiteElo "2775"] [BlackElo "2870"] [Annotator "Josh Friedel"] [PlyCount "64"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] [TimeControl "40/7200:20/3600:900+30"] 1. e4 {Vishy decides to stick to the move which has served him well for the majority of his career.} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. Bxc6 {Anand is the first to divert from game 6. After the capture on c6, the positions have a similar flavor to those in the Delayed Exchange Spanish.} dxc6 6. Nbd2 {This line has been rather popular recently.} Bg4 {Not the most common move, but a perfectly logical one.} 7. h3 Bh5 {This move is basically new.} (7... Bxf3 { has been played a few times, but I don't think the positions are all that different.} 8. Qxf3 Nd7 9. Qg3 Qf6 10. Nc4 O-O 11. O-O Rfe8 12. a4 Nf8 13. Bg5 Qe6 14. Bd2 Ng6 15. b4 Bf8 16. Qg4 b6 17. g3 f6 18. Bc3 Bd6 19. Ne3 Kh8 20. Kg2 a6 21. Qf3 Ne7 22. h4 b5 23. Rfb1 Qd7 24. h5 h6 25. Qg4 Qxg4 26. Nxg4 Nc8 27. Bd2 Nb6 28. a5 Nd7 29. c4 c5 30. cxb5 axb5 31. bxc5 Nxc5 32. Rxb5 Nxd3 33. Ra4 Ra6 34. Rc4 c5 35. Ne3 Rea8 36. Rc3 Nb4 37. Nc4 Be7 38. Rb3 Nc6 39. Rb6 Nb4 40. Kf3 R6a7 41. Be3 Kg8 42. Rb2 Rc7 43. Kg4 Kf7 44. Rb1 Nc6 45. R1b5 Nd4 46. Rb1 Nc6 47. R6b5 Nd4 48. Rb7 Rxb7 49. Rxb7 Ke6 50. Bd2 Ra6 51. Bc3 Bf8 52. f4 exf4 53. gxf4 f5+ 54. exf5+ Kd5 55. Ne5 Ne2 56. Be1 Bd6 57. Rxg7 Nxf4 58. Nf7 Nd3 59. Nxd6 Nxe1 60. Ne8 Rxa5 61. Rd7+ Kc6 62. Rd6+ Kb5 63. f6 Ra7 64. Re6 Nd3 65. f7 Ra4+ 66. Kg3 {1-0 (66) Adams,M (2733)-Fressinet,L (2696) Germany 2012}) 8. Nf1 {This idea is a well-known one, but here it looks rather slow, and Black really doesn't mind taking on f3 anyway.} (8. g4 {was a more aggressive, yet riskier approach.}) (8. Nc4 Nd7 9. Be3 {looks like another reasonable try for White.}) 8... Nd7 9. Ng3 Bxf3 10. Qxf3 g6 {The position is similar to the one from Adams-Fressinet, but here White's knight looks a bit foolish on g3. Even so, I don't think the assessment of the position will change all that much. White has a minor structural advantage, but it is difficult to convert this into a win.} 11. Be3 Qe7 12. O-O-O O-O-O 13. Ne2 {The knight was no longer useful on g3, and Anand probably hopes to play f4 one day.} Rhe8 14. Kb1 {Both sides make small improvements to their position without committing themselves.} b6 15. h4 Kb7 (15... h5 {looks normal to me, but the h-file probably isn't overly significant.}) 16. h5 Bxe3 17. Qxe3 Nc5 18. hxg6 hxg6 19. g3 {Despite the doubled pawns, this position can be safely called equal, as there is absolutely no way for White to use this to his advantage. However, as we know from the previous games, equal positions still demand some precision now and then.} a5 20. Rh7 {Might as well, right?} Rh8 21. Rdh1 Rxh7 22. Rxh7 Qf6 { Black prepares to trade off the intruder with Rh8. The position is still completely balanced.} 23. f4 {A logical pawn break, but it has little to no affect on the position, as it will create no weaknesses.} Rh8 24. Rxh8 (24. fxe5 Qf1+ {would not be recommended.}) 24... Qxh8 25. fxe5 Qxe5 26. Qf3 (26. d4 Qxe4 {simply loses a pawn. Even in very dry positions, little tactics tend to hold everything together, and it is very important to never turn off that calculation engine completely.}) 26... f5 27. exf5 gxf5 {If at all possible, the position has become even more equal. There are no weaknesses and no possible pawn majorities.} 28. c3 Ne6 29. Kc2 Ng5 30. Qf2 Ne6 {When neither side can really improve their position, repetitions start to loom over the position like vultures.} 31. Qf3 Ng5 32. Qf2 Ne6 {And there you have it. On some level, it is disappointed Vishy didn't show a lot of ambition today, but it is understandable in his situation as well. After two tough losses, the first priority is often just to stop the bleeding, at least according to the chessplayers and physicians I've spoken to. Now that he's done that, let's see if he can find a way to strike back at the seemingly untouchable Norwegian.} *

In some ways, this isn't all that terrible for Anand either. He does have some time to recuperate, and after all he has stopped the hemorrhage caused by the last two games. He has achieved a draw, he can maybe try to stabilize with another one tomorrow and then go all out after the rest day.

The wonderful questions keep coming in the press conference:

V Kameswaran, United New India: Anand, today did not go well. Tensions were released. Tomorrow, what is Anand going to do, do you have a plan? Is it not to allow your opponent to cross six points?

Anand: Well, in general, that is the plan

The players were clear on one thing, Black didn't have any problems. However neither seemed to really say that this was a bad thing for Anand. Partially this is due to caution on both sides, but maybe it is true that Anand needed to simply stabilize. I expect Anand to still not go all out tomorrow, especially since he will be Black. However the round after the rest day I'm starting to expect Anand to open 1. d4 or use something more bizarre like a Scotch. Hell, at some point throwing a King's Gambit at his opponent's face is better than going to for these tame positions.

"4.5 + 0.5 + 0.5 + 0.5 + 0.5. Yeah that's all I need" Actually Carlsen is not the type of person to ever count like that, he will just play for the win if he ever sees the slightest of opportunities.

Henrik Carlsen (left) discusses match strategy with the New In Chess editor Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam. Or they are planning their blitz rematch after a thrilling battle played in Saint Louis earlier this year.

There are approximately 867,800,000 mobile numbers in India, and these ladies make sure none of them bother the players.

Joshua Friedel

Josh was born in 1986 in New Hampshire, USA and is currently living in Wisconsin. He obtained his international master title in 2005 and his grandmaster in 2008. He has participated in five US Championships, including a tie for fourth in 2008. Major Open tournament victories include: the 2003 Eastern Open, 2005 Berkeley Masters, 2008 National Open, 2009 Edmonton International, 2009 North American Open, 2010 Saint Louis Open, 2010 American Open, 2013 Chicago Open.

Josh is the current US Open Champion and is the first person qualified for the 2014 US Chess Championship.

Report by Alejandro Ramirez, photos by Anastasiya Karlovich

Report in Hindi by Niklesh Jain:

आनंद कार्लसन की सातवीं बाजी ड्रॉ । कार्लसन हुए 4.5-2.5 से आगे

एक दिन के विश्राम के बाद शुरू हुए आज फीडे विश्व शतरंज प्रतियोगिता के दूसरे पड़ाव में खेली गई सातवी बाजी मात्र दो घंटे के खेल में बराबरी पर समाप्त हुई । पिछले चक्र की समाप्ती पर 4-2 से बढ़त बना चुके मेगनस के लिए ये बाजी विश्व खिताब की और बढ़ता एक और कदम नजर आयी । अब अगर मौजूदा विश्व विजेता भारत के विश्वनाथन आनंद को अपने खिताब की रक्षा करनी है तो बचे हुए 5 मैच में से उन्हे 3 मैच जीतने होंगे और दो ड्रॉ करने होंगे । जो की वर्तमान परिस्थितियों में काफी मुश्किल नजर आ रहा है । हालांकि आनंद ने पूर्व में भी विश्व चैंपियनशिप के दौरान कई बार वापसी की है और अभी भी इसे असंभव नहीं कहा जा सकता । पर इतना तय है की अगर आनंद को यह खिताब जीतना है तो ना सिर्फ उन्हे अपने खेल के स्तर को ऊपर उठाना होगा बल्कि अपनी चालो से कार्लसन को गल्ती करने के लिए मजबूर करना होगा । आज के  मैच की शुरुआत  आनंद ने सफ़ेद मोहरो से 1.e4 चलते हुए की और  जबाब में एक बार फिर कार्लसन ने पुनः 1.. e5 चलते हुए जबाब दिया । 2. Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.d3 Bc5 5.Bxc6 dxc6 खेल एक बार फिर राय लोपेज ओपेनिंग के एंटी बर्लिन डिफ़ेंसे में पहुँच गया । आज आनंद से सभी को कुछ नयी ओपनिंग की उम्मीद थी पर पता नहीं उनकी सोच में क्या रणनीति थी । 6.Nbd2!? आनंद और कार्लसन इससे पहले भी कई बार इस ओपनिंग पर अलग अलग खिलाड़ियों से मैच खेल चुके हैं । अतः आनंद का एक बार फिर इसी लाइन पर मैच खेलना विशेषज्ञो को काफी चौकने वाला रहा । इस मार्च में ही आनंद ने पूर्व विश्व चैम्पियन क्रामनिक को इसी लाइन मे हराया था ऐसे में निश्चित तौर पर कार्लसन इस पर तैयारी कर के आए होंगे ।और जबाब में कार्लसन काफी तेज भी खेल रहे थे ।  6.. Bg4 7.h3 Bh5 8.Nf1!? रोचक चाल आनंद ने अपने घोड़े को g3 से निकालने का संकेत देते हुए एक बार फिर नावेल्टी चलते हुए यह जताया की शायद उन्होने यही नयी चाल कार्लसन के लिए तैयार रखी थी और अब देखना ये था की आत्मविश्वास से भरे हुए कार्लसन के लिए ये कितना काम करने वाली थी । 8.. Nd7 9.Ng3 Bxf3 10.Qxf3 आनंद ने अपने घोड़े को g3 से निकालते हुए कार्लसन के ऊंट पर आक्रमण किया और कार्लसन ने तुरंत f3 खाने के घोड़े को बदलते हुए अपने ऊंट से मारा जबाब मे आनंद ने एकमात्र चाल के रूप में अपने वजीर को बाहर निकालते हुए विरोधी ऊंट को मारा । g6 11.Be3 Qe7 12.0–0–0 0–0–0 दोनों खिलाड़ियों के वजीर की तरफ किलेबंदी करते ही खेल एक नए दौर में पहुँच गया ।13.Ne2 Rhe8 14.Kb1 b6 15.h4!? मुख्य तौर पर इस ओपनिंग में आनंद के पास किंगसाइड आक्रमण करने की  दो योजना थी एक तो g3–f4 के जरिये और एक h फाइल की पैदल को आगे बढ़ते हुए और आनंद ने दूसरी योजना के जरिये खेल को आगे बढ़ाना उचित समझा ।15..  Kb7 16.h5 Bxe3 17.Qxe3 Nc5 18.hxg6 hxg6 इसके साथ ही h फाइल खुल गयी पर फिर भी किसी भी तरह का कोई खास फायदा नजर नहीं आ रहा था । हालांकि क्वीनसाइड  पर कार्लसन की दो पैदल एक ही फाइल में थी पर यह बात भी आनंद के पक्ष में कोई खास अंतर पैदा नहीं कर रही थी । कार्लसन का पूरा ध्यान निश्चित तौर पर आज मैच को किसी भी तरह बराबरी पर रोककर अपनी बढ़त को और मजबूत करना था और आगे के खेल में उन्होने किया भी यही । 19.g3 a5 20.Rh7 Rh8 21.Rdh1 Rxh7 22.Rxh7 Qf6 23.f4 Rh8 24.Rxh8 Qxh8 इसके साथ ही यह बाजी भी एक आसान ड्रॉ की तरफ मुड़ गयी । 25.fxe5 Qxe5 26.Qf3 f5 27.exf5 gxf5 28.c3 Ne6 29.Kc2 Ng5 30.Qf2 Ne6 31.Qf3 Ng5 32.Qf2 Ne6 चलते ही दोनों खिलाड़ी अंक बांटने पर सहमत हो गए ।इसके साथ ही कार्लसन ने आनंद के खिलाफ अपनी बढ़त 4.5-2.5 की कर ली है । भारत और आनंद के नजरिए से अभी तक का परिणाम काफी निराश करने वाला है और अब आनंद और उनकी टीम के पास सिर्फ गिने चुने मैच ही बाकी है प्रतियोगिता अब आधे से ज्यादा आगे बढ़ चुकी है और अब आनंद की सर्वश्रेस्ठ लय ही उनके खिताब को बचा सकती है । देखना ये होगा की कार्लसन आने वाले मैच मे अपने खेलने के तरीके में क्या परिवर्तन करते है क्या वह और रक्षात्मक होते है या आक्रामक आनंद से अब भी उनके प्रसंसको को बहुत उम्मीदें है और हो भी क्यों ना वे हर बार उस पर अब तक खरे भी तो उतरते आए है । खैर परिणाम जो भी हो वह इस खेल के महान खिलाड़ियो में पहले ही अपनी जगह बना चुके है। उम्मीद है की कल एक जोरदार बाजी के हम सब गवाह होंगे ... आपका निकलेश जैन      

Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
Perf.
V. Anand 2775
½
½
½
½
0
0
½
         
2.5
2768
M. Carlsen 2870
½
½
½
½
1
1
½
         
4.5
2877

Tournament details

Schedule: the match will be played over a maximum of twelve games, and the winner of the match will be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the winner scores 6.5 points in less than 12 games then the closing ceremony will take place on the day after the World Championship has been decided or one day thereafter.

07 November 2013 – Opening Ceremony
09 November 2013 – Game 1
10 November 2013 – Game 2
11 November 2013 – Rest Day
12 November 2013 – Game 3
13 November 2013 – Game 4
14 November 2013 – Rest Day
15 November 2013 – Game 5
16 November 2013 – Game 6
17 November 2013 – Rest Day
18 November 2013 – Game 7
19 November 2013 – Game 8
20 November 2013 – Rest Day
21 November 2013 – Game 9
22 November 2013 – Game 10
23 November 2013 – Rest Day
24 November 2013 – Game 11
25 November 2013 – Rest Day
26 November 2013 – Game 12
27 November 2013 – Rest Day
28 November 2013 – Tiebreak games
29 November 2013 – Closing Ceremony

Live commentary on Playchess in English

Day
Round
Live Playchess commentary in English
Nov. 09
1
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 10
2
GM Daniel King + GM Yasser Seirawan
Nov. 12
3
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 13
4
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 15
5
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 16
6
GM Daniel King + GM GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 18
7
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 19
8
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward
Nov. 21
9
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 22
10
GM Daniel King + GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
Nov. 24
11
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 26
12
GM Chris Ward + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 28
Tiebreak
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward

Live commentary in other languages

Day
Round
French German Spanish
Nov. 09
1
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 10
2
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 12
3
GM Christian Bauer GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 13
4
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 15
5
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 16
6
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 18
7
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 19
8
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 21
9
GM M. Vachier-Lagrave GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 22
10
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 24
11
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 26
12
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 28
TB
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García

The commentary will commence around 30 minutes after the start of the games. The schedule and commentators may be changed before the start of the Championship on November 9th, with long and short castlings possible.

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site, with special coverage on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


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