Chennai 06: Disaster for India

11/16/2013 – The match isn't quite over, but Anand is in such a disadvantage. Psychologically he might be able to recover, but the damage done in the scoreboard and the obvious fact that his preparation isn't causing Carlsen problems should worry him greatly. Tomorrow is as rest day, a much needed one for himself and his team as they try to conjure some ideas. Analysis of today's major mistake.

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FIDE World Chess Championship Anand-Carlsen 2013

The FIDE World Chess Championship match between defending champion Viswanathan Anand and his challenger world number one Magnus Carlsen is taking place from November 9 to 28 2013 in the the Hyatt Regency, Chennai, India. The match is over twelve games, with time controls of 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move starting from move 61. The games start at 3:00 p.m. Indian Time, which is 4:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (New York), 10:30h Central European Time (Paris), 1:30 p.m. Moscow Standard Time. Find your local time here.

Round five video by GM Daniel King

 

Round six report by Alejandro Ramirez

Who is the happiest person in this photo?

Carlsen spotted him

There is no easy way to put it for Team Anand. This was a complete disaster. Anand came into the game with a novelty, an interesting idea in an anti-Berlin Spanish. Almost immediately he lost the opening advantage, its likely that to have any he should have traded the bishops on e6 as soon as possible. His maneuvers on the kingside led to nothing and the game was completely level. The commentators (including myself) were just waiting for the peace treaty to be signed.

And yet, Carlsen was just Carlsen. He kept making moves that didn't allow an immediate draw but didn't make his position any worse. And Anand slowly self destructed. For some reason he allowed a horrible pawn structure on e3/e4, then he exposed this weakness. Almost immediately after he 'sacrificed' a pawn for a drawn rook endgame, which should have been held with good play. And yet when the draw was almost there Anand made a completely incomprehensible blunder. The move 60.Ra4 made absolutely no sense: there was no point in trying to stop the pawn from the side and the only hope was to push his own pawns.

Anand came in well prepared theoretically, but he just did not play well today

Tea didn't help today

Friedel's analysis of a mysterious game six:

[Event "FWCM 2013"] [Site "Chennai"] [Date "2013.11.16"] [Round "6"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C65"] [WhiteElo "2775"] [BlackElo "2870"] [Annotator "Josh Friedel"] [PlyCount "134"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] [TimeControl "40/7200:20/3600:900+30"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 {Vishy decides to avoid main line Berlin this time.} Bc5 5. c3 O-O 6. O-O Re8 {This move has been popular lately, the main purpose being to discourage Bxc6 options.} (6... d6 {has been the main line for awhile, and now for instance if} 7. h3 a6 {White has the option of} 8. Bxc6 {which leads to positions where Black relies on dynamic play with the bishops in order to compensate for his weak pawns.} bxc6 9. d4 Bb6 {etc.}) 7. Re1 (7. Nbd2 {has been slightly more popular, with play continuing} a6 8. Ba4 b5 9. Bb3 d6 {with normal position for such lines. Nbd2 is slightly more useful than Re1 I'd say, but now Bg5 options are cut off, one which Vishy used in the game.}) 7... a6 8. Ba4 (8. Bxc6 dxc6 {reveals the point of Black's 6... Re8 move order, and if White ever plays d4 then after ed cd Bb6 (or a7) Black will have excellent play against the center.}) 8... b5 9. Bb3 d6 (9... h6 {It was possible to be clever with this move, but now White can try} 10. a4) 10. Bg5 {This was clearly preparation by Anand, and Carlsen was already thinking a bit.} Be6 {Carlsen avoids the invitation to sharpen the game.} (10... h6 11. Bh4 g5 {was more ambitious, but it is a riskier way to play, especially when you consider that your opponent has prepared it and you haven't.}) 11. Nbd2 ( 11. Bxe6 {was not unreasonable, and play would likely follow} fxe6 (11... Rxe6 12. d4 exd4 13. cxd4 Bb4 14. Nc3 {is simply better for White.}) 12. b4 Bb6 13. a4 {and I like White's prospects here, as b5 is weak and the pin on the knight is still annoying. Also note that the rook would rather be back on f8 now.}) 11... h6 12. Bh4 Bxb3 13. axb3 {Taking back with the pawn is usually best, as it activates the a1 rook and neither the queen or knight really want to be on b3.} Nb8 {Computers will likely frown on such a move, but I like it a lot. Trading the light-squared bishops helps Black in some ways, as d4 is less effective now and there is a bit more room for Black's pieces. The drawback, however, is that the f5 square is more difficult to control. This means that playing g5 is a positional no-no, and thus Magnus finds another way to take care of this pin.} 14. h3 (14. b4 Bb6 15. Ra3 {was an alternative, preparing to put pressure on the a-pawn, but Vishy had his sights set elsewhere.}) 14... Nbd7 15. Nh2 (15. b4 Bb6 16. Nf1 {looks a bit more pointed, and now if} Nf8 17. Ne3 {Black probably has to take the e3 knight, as if} Ng6 (17... Bxe3 18. fxe3 {may not be much, but I'd still rather be White.}) 18. Bxf6 (18. Nf5 $5 {is also interesting.}) 18... Qxf6 19. Nd5 Qd8 20. g3 {and White has a small edge due to a6 and the fact that Black's knight on g6 isn't so hot now.}) 15... Qe7 16. Ndf1 Bb6 17. Ne3 Qe6 {Carlsen has achieved the ideal setup, and now the position is level.} 18. b4 a5 {and he eliminates his last weakness.} 19. bxa5 Bxa5 20. Nhg4 Bb6 21. Bxf6 Nxf6 22. Nxf6+ Qxf6 {It is hard to get more level than this. The bishop really doesn't have much on the knight here, though it does look somewhat prettier.} 23. Qg4 {I'm not super crazy about allowing the doubled e-pawns, but I doubt it is anything serious.} (23. Qe2 $11) 23... Bxe3 24. fxe3 Qe7 25. Rf1 c5 {The trouble with the doubled e-pawns is that in some situations e4 might be weak. Of course this shouldn't be a huge issue, but as we saw from yesterday's game, Carlsen doesn't need a lot of objective advantage to put the pressure on.} 26. Kh2 c4 27. d4 Rxa1 (27... g6 {I kind of like this move, just keeping the tension on the a-file. Of course everything is pretty close to even.}) 28. Rxa1 Qb7 29. Rd1 (29. d5 {looks like a simpler draw, since Black can't try anything on the queenside without letting White's queen in.}) 29... Qc6 (29... exd4 30. Rxd4 Re6 31. Rd5 {and the e-pawns aren't super meaningful since d6 and b5 both require defense as well. Having the rook on d5 is key here.}) 30. Qf5 (30. d5 {is still drawish.}) 30... exd4 31. Rxd4 Re5 {Now White has to start being careful, as we have the same position has mentioned in the move 29 note, but here Black gets the rook to the 5th rank first.} 32. Qf3 {Here White's strategy will simply be to wait, and it is only a question of whether Black can find a way to create problems.} Qc7 33. Kh1 Qe7 34. Qg4 {White is mostly sitting, but it doesn't hurt to make mini threats, in this case of Qc8+ followed by Qc6.} Kh7 {Ah well, another day.} 35. Qf4 g6 36. Kh2 Kg7 {Black makes small improvements. You want to make as many as possible before you initiate concrete action when your opponent is moving back and forth. Also, when your opponent is just waiting, it is usually a good psychological strategy to make them wait as long as you can. In other words, pretend you are a cable repairman.} 37. Qf3 Re6 38. Qg3 {An strange decision in my opinion. Vishy provokes Magnus into taking the pawn on e4.} (38. Kg1 { would keep the status quo, but perhaps Vishy thought sitting would be bad in the long term here. Ideas like Rf6 always have to be considered, and sometimes even queen swings like Qa7-a1. Nevertheless, it isn't obvious to me how Black will break through, and White isn't going to lose any material.}) 38... Rxe4 39. Qxd6 Rxe3 (39... Qxd6+ 40. Rxd6 Rxe3 41. Rd5 b4 42. cxb4 Rb3 43. b5 Rxb2 44. Rc5 {and the b/c pawns will be hacked off, leading to a drawn 3 vs. 2 rook ending. This is almost certainly what Vishy hoped for.}) 40. Qxe7 Rxe7 41. Rd5 Rb7 {White is likely drawing here with best play due to his active rook, but at least Black keeps the queenside and can make him sweat. I can't imagine Vishy would opt for this over the position with the doubled e-pawns, so it is possible he miscalculated something.} 42. Rd6 {This is almost certainly the correct idea, preventing Kf6-e6. Note how if the black rook moves from guarding the b-pawn you can always play Rd5 or Rb6.} f6 {Moving the f-pawn is always a committal decision in these endings. His idea is to advance the king on the kingside rather than try to bring it to the queenside.} (42... Kf8 {was the main alternative, but I don't see how to make progress after} 43. Kg3 Ke7 44. Rc6 {and Black can't really activate his king or rook, since if} Kd7 {then} 45. Rf6 Ke7 46. Rc6 {and if} Rd7 {then} 47. Rc5 {and the rook has to go back again.}) (42... h5 {is similar, but Carlsen prefers to be more flexible with his g/h pawns.}) 43. h4 {White prepares to respond to g5 with h5.} Kf7 (43... h5 {kills the option played in the game, and already Re7 is playable next. I almost certainly prefer this to Carlsen's move. Play could continue} 44. Kg3 Re7 45. Kf3 Re5 46. g3 Rf5+ 47. Kg2 Kf7 {and clearly Black is making some progress.}) 44. h5 {Once again, Vishy tries to find a concrete solution to his problems. In this case, unlike before, I really like his decision.} gxh5 { Other moves fail to impress.} (44... g5 45. Kg3 Re7 46. Rb6 Re5 47. Kf3 {and Black can't make any progress.}) (44... Re7 45. Rb6 {and} Re5 {is met by} 46. Rb7+ {with a draw.}) (44... Ke7 45. Rc6 {doesn't change anything.}) 45. Rd5 { This is the main point. White's rook can't really be chased from the 5th rank now, as the f5 and h5 squares cannot be defended. This means that Black's rook will remain passive or he'll have to sacrifice b5.} Kg6 46. Kg3 Rb6 47. Rc5 f5 48. Kh4 Re6 {This is Carlsen's only idea.} 49. Rxb5 Re4+ 50. Kh3 (50. Kg3 { would have spared Anand a lot of grief, as now the king will go to f2 rather than getting stuck in the corner.}) 50... Kg5 51. Rb8 h4 52. Rg8+ Kh5 53. Rf8 Rf4 54. Rc8 Rg4 55. Rf8 {It looks as if Black is stuck, but there are a few tricks left.} Rg3+ 56. Kh2 Kg5 57. Rg8+ Kf4 {The world #1 puts his fighting spirit on display. He sacrifices his c4 in order to improve his king. This had to be extremely well calculated and he does it all for one more chance to win.} 58. Rc8 Ke3 59. Rxc4 f4 {This is the key moment. The position is a strange one, as the b+c pawns actually hinder White by blocking his rook from giving checks. This means the passed f-pawn Black will obtain after h3 will be particularly nasty. Also, if there were ever an advertisement for the importance of king position in rook endings, this is it.} 60. Ra4 $4 (60. b4 {is cold-blooded, but Black seems to have no way to win now. Here are a few variations. The basic idea is that Black will play h3 in order to free his f-pawn, and While will try to check Black's king in front of it while creating a dangerous pawn as soon as possible.} h3 61. gxh3 Rg5 {is a crafty idea, trying to prevent the b5 push, but White draws here as well after} (61... Rg6 62. Rc7 f3 63. Re7+ Kd2 (63... Kf2 64. b5 {is the same.}) 64. Rd7+ Ke2 65. Re7+ Kf1 66. b5 f2 67. c4 { and White draws comfortably since there is no way to maneuver the rook around without letting White queen.}) 62. Rc6 f3 63. Re6+ Kf2 64. Rxh6 Kf1 65. h4 { simplest.} Re5 66. Rf6 f2 67. c4 {it is also drawn, since after} Ke1 68. Kg2 Re2 69. Kg3 f1=Q 70. Rxf1+ Kxf1 71. c5 Re3+ 72. Kf4 {White just has too many pawns and Black isn't in time. I'll give a sample line.} Kf2 73. c6 Rc3 74. b5 Rc5 75. h5 Rxb5 76. c7 Rc5 77. h6 Rxc7 78. Kf5 Kf3 79. Kg6 Kg4 80. h7 $11) 60... h3 61. gxh3 Rg6 {Now we have a similar situation, but White's pawns are farther back, and that makes all the difference. The rook is also poorly placed on a4.} 62. c4 f3 63. Ra3+ (63. Ra7 Rg2+ 64. Kh1 Re2 $1 {is cleanest, and now after} 65. Re7+ Kd2 66. Rf7 f2 67. Kg2 Ke1 {Black wins comfortably.}) 63... Ke2 64. b4 f2 65. Ra2+ Kf3 66. Ra3+ Kf4 67. Ra8 (67. Ra1 Re6 {followed by Ra1 also doesn't help.}) 67... Rg1 {and White resigned, as his rook has to sacrifice for the f-pawn and the connected passers are too far back. Once again, Magnus kept applying pressure with a small edge and it paid off, and all it required was one late game blunder from Vishy. This will be a brutal pill to swallow for the World Champ, but let's see if he'll find a way to fight back in the second half of the match.} 0-1

Anand's position is very desperate. It's not something that is impossible to recover from, but certainly is very hard. Carlsen seems to be the better player, and even Anand's preparation just failed to do much of anything. Anand snapped a little to the journalists today during the press conference, though admittedly the questions were as inappropiate and annoying as they were repetitive:

Reporter A: How do you move on from this massive blow? (asked for the millionth time in one way or another)

Anand: Well, I'll just to my best

Reporter B: can you clarify by "do your best"?

Anand: Try your best means try your best. I don't know why you don't understand English.

If there is anyone in the world that has the psychological strength to recover from this, it is Anand. He has been behind in two World Championship matches and made it back to win them. The question here is not so much his psychological stability - he has that, he has the experience. The question is wether he has the playing strength to overcome Carlsen.

The match is not over, but Team Anand must be in panic mode. The match is half way through, and Carlsen leads by a full two games.

Carlsen never really stares at any one given place. He usually just looks around a lot like he is very distracted.

Clearly not looking at the board

His 'I'm focusing' look

Nakamura had something to say about today's games, and what it means for chess:

The number four in the World and America's number one also pointed out another sad fact for India: Sachin Tendulkar has retired. Tomorrow is a rest day, and let's hope Anand can bring some fight into this World Championship and it doesn't become an Ushenina-Hou Yifan from earlier this year.

Joshua Friedel

Josh was born in 1986 in New Hampshire, USA and is currently living in Wisconsin. He obtained his international master title in 2005 and his grandmaster in 2008. He has participated in five US Championships, including a tie for fourth in 2008. Major Open tournament victories include: the 2003 Eastern Open, 2005 Berkeley Masters, 2008 National Open, 2009 Edmonton International, 2009 North American Open, 2010 Saint Louis Open, 2010 American Open, 2013 Chicago Open.

Josh is the current US Open Champion and is the first person qualified for the 2014 US Chess Championship.

Report by Alejandro Ramirez, photos by Anastasiya Karlovich

Report in Hindi by Niklesh Jain:

मेगनस कार्लसन की आनंद पर अविश्वसनीय जीत !! 4-2 से हुए आगे !!

चेन्नई भारत मे चल रही फीडे विश्व शतरंज चैंपियनशिप मे आज एक बार फिर नार्वे के मेगनस कार्लसन ने मौजूदा विश्व चैम्पियन भारत के विश्वनाथन आनंद को लगातार दूसरे मैच में पराजित करते हुए अविश्वसनीय 4-2 की बढ़त हंसिल कर ली है। आनंद ने आज पूरी तरह दबाव में आते हुए एक के बाद एक जल्दी चालें चलते हुए कई बिना वजह गलतियाँ की और एक बार पुनः बराबर चल रहे एंडगेम को गंवा बैठे । 22 वर्षीय मेगनस कार्लसन की पाँच बार के विश्व चैम्पियन 44 वर्षीय विश्वनाथन आनंद के उपर 5 घंटे चले मुक़ाबले मे मिलीं इस दूसरी जीत ने पूरे विश्व शतरंज जगत मे खलबली मचा दी है । इसके साथ ही कार्लसन ने विश्व शतरंज जगत के सबसे युवा विश्व चैम्पियन बनने की और अपने कदम बेहद मजबूती से बढ़ा दिए है । यंहा से आनंद के लिए वापसी करना बहुत ही मुश्किल नजर आ रहा है। आज खेल की शुरुआत सफ़ेद मोहरो से खेल रहे आनंद ने लगातार तीसरी बार 1. e4 चलकर की और कार्लसन ने एक बार पुनः 1... e5 चलते हुए जबाब दिया । अगली कुछ चाल 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 से खेल एक बार पुनः चौथे मैच के तर्ज पर राय लोपेज ओपेनिंग में पहुँच गया । कार्लसन की 3-2 की बढ़त को ध्यान मे रखते हुए आज आनंद से जोरदार खेल की उम्मीद थी और शुरुआत में आनंद काफी सहज और आत्मविश्वास से भरे हुए भी नजर आए और खेल के पहले 3 घंटो मे बेहतर खेले भी ।  3... Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. c3 O-O 6. O-O Re8 7. Re1 a6 8. Ba4  8...b5 9.Bb3 d6. इसके साथ ही खेल क्लोज़  बर्लिन डिफ़ेंस वेरिएसन में पहुँच गया ।  10. Bg5 !?N आनंद ने जल्द ही ऊंट की यह चाल चलते हुए ऐसा संकेत दिया के आज शायद वो कुछ नया तैयार कर के आए है । इससे पहले आनंद ने अर्नोनियन के खिलाफ इसी चाल पर Nbd2 खेला था और वह मैच ड्रॉ पर छूटा था ।  कार्लसन ने 10... Be6 चलते हुए आनंद के बहुत महत्वपूर्ण सफ़ेद खाने के ऊंट को लगभग चुनौती देते हुए अपने ऊंट को बाहर निकाला । उसके बाद खेल कुछ इस तरह से आगे बढ़ा । 11. Nbd2 h6 12. Bh4  Bxb3 इस चाल के साथ ही कार्लसेन ने अपने ऊंट को आनंद के ऊंट से बदलते हुए खेल से बाहर कर दिया । 13.ab3 आनंद ने अपनी पैदल से ऊंट को मारते हुए अपनी महत्वपूर्ण a फ़ाइल खोल ली ।
13... Nb8 !? कार्लसन ने रोचक चाल चली और अपने घोड़े का भविष्य दूसरे रास्ते से तय कर दिया । 14. h3 !? इस बार रोचक चाल चलते हुए  आनंद ने अपने घोड़े को Nh2-Ng4 के जरिये बाहर लाने का संकेत दिया । 14... Nbd7 15. Nh2 Qe7  16. Ndf1 !? ऐसा लग रहा था की आनंद आज वापसी करने के पूरे मूड़ में है और कार्लसन को अपने राजा की तरफ हमले के लिए तैयार रहना होगा । आनंद की योजना कार्लसन के कमजोर नजर आ रहे f5 खाने का फायदा उठाने की लग रही थी ।  16... Bb6  17. Ne3 Qe6 18. b4  a5 19. bxa5 Bxa5 इसके साथ ही कार्लसन ने खेल में बराबरी हासिल कर ली थी । 20. Nhg4 Bb6 21. Bxf6 ?!आनंद ने एक बार पुनः पिछले मैच की तरह खुद ही मोहरो की अदला बदली शुरू कर खेल को कार्लसन के मजबूत पक्ष के तरफ मोड़ दिया । 21... Nxf6 22. Nxf6+ Qxf6  23... Bxe3 24. fxe3 Qe7 25. Rf1 c5  अचानक कार्लसन की पकड़ ज्यादा मजबूत नजर आने लगी और शायद यही खेल का निर्णायक दौर साबित हुआ आनंद जीतने के दबाव मे कुछ हटकर चालें चलते हुए लगातार गलतियाँ करने लगे । 26. Kh2 c4 !27. d4 Rxa1 28. Rxa1 और लगा के यह बाजी अब ड्रॉ की तरफ बढ़ जाएगी .28..Qb7 इसके साथ ही कार्लसन ने जीतने के लिए खेलने के संकेत दिए पर इस समय ऐसा कुछ भी नजर नहीं आ रहा था ।  29. Rd1  29... Qc6 30. Qf5!?आनंद लगातार कुछ असमान्य करने की कोशिश में गलत चालें चलने लगे थे और कार्लसन ने यह भाँप लिया था के शायद आनंद दबाव महसूस कर रहे हैं  । 30..exd4 31. Rxd4 Re5 32. Qf3 32... Qc7  33. Kh1 Qe7  34. Qg4 Kh7 35. Qf4 g6  36. Kh2 Kg7 37. Qf3 Re6 38. Qg3 !?Rxe4 39. Qxd6 Rxe3 40. Qxe7 Rxe7 41. Rd5 Rb7 
42. Rd6 f6 43. h4 Kf7 44. h5 gxh5 45. Rd5 Kg6 46. Kg3 Rb6 47. Rc5 f5 48. Kh4 Re6 
49. Rxb5 Re4+ 50. Kh3 Kg5 51. Rb8 h4 52. Rg8+ Kh5 53. Rf8 Rf4 54. Rc8 Rg4 55. Rf8 Rg3+ 
56. Kh2 Kg5 57. Rg8+ Kf4 58. Rc8 Ke3 59. Rxc4 f4 60. Ra4 ?? भयंकर भूल ??एक बार फिर आनंद ने काफी तेजी से एक गलत चाल खेली वो b4 चलकर आसानी से खेल बराबरी पर ला  सकते थे । अचानक अब बाजी लगभग अंत के करीब आ गयी  60... h3 61. gxh3 Rg6!!इस चाल ने कार्लसन की कल की Rh6 की याद दिला दी और यह बता दिया के वो एंडगेम के कितने महारथी बन चुके हैं ।   62. c4 f3 63. Ra3+ Ke2 64. b4 f2 65. Ra2+ Kf3 66. Ra3+ Kf4 67. Ra8 Rg1 और आनंद ने एक बार फिर अपनी हार स्वीकार कर ली । इसके साथ ही युवा और चमत्कारिक कार्लसन ने निर्णायक सी 4-2 की बढ़त बना ली है । यह मैच एक बार फिर कार्लसन के शानदार खेल और हमेशा जीतने के लिए खेलने वाले स्वभाव के साथ साथ आनंद के अंत समय में उनके स्तर से काफी नीचे खेले गए खेल की वजह से जाना जाएगा । आनंद को यह समझना होगा की वह पाँच बार के विश्व चैम्पियन हैं और उनका बिना दबाव में खेला  गया उनका स्वाभाविक खेल ही अब वापसी का एकमात्र रास्ता है । हालांकि भारत के इस  बेटे जिसने हमेशा देश को गौरान्वित किया है  पूरा भारत अभी भी उनके साथ समर्थन में खड़ा हुआ है । भारत के नजरिए से अब आनंद की इच्छाशक्ति ही उन्हे इस खेल में वापस ला सकती है । कल के आराम के दौरान उन्हे अपनी गल्तियो से सबक लेते हुए अपने खेल में जोरदार सुधार करना होगा । उम्मीद है कि एक दिन बाद हमें एक नये और सकारात्मक ऊर्जा से भरे आनंद नजर आएंगे । पर अंत में युवा कार्लसन के हमेशा जीतने के लिए खेलने वाले जज्बे के लिए उन्हे बधाई ......आपका निकलेश जैन  

Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
Perf.
V. Anand 2775
½
½
½
½
0
0
           
2.0
2750
M. Carlsen 2870
½
½
½
½
1
1
           
4.0
2895

Tournament details

Schedule: the match will be played over a maximum of twelve games, and the winner of the match will be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the winner scores 6.5 points in less than 12 games then the closing ceremony will take place on the day after the World Championship has been decided or one day thereafter.

07 November 2013 – Opening Ceremony
09 November 2013 – Game 1
10 November 2013 – Game 2
11 November 2013 – Rest Day
12 November 2013 – Game 3
13 November 2013 – Game 4
14 November 2013 – Rest Day
15 November 2013 – Game 5
16 November 2013 – Game 6
17 November 2013 – Rest Day
18 November 2013 – Game 7
19 November 2013 – Game 8
20 November 2013 – Rest Day
21 November 2013 – Game 9
22 November 2013 – Game 10
23 November 2013 – Rest Day
24 November 2013 – Game 11
25 November 2013 – Rest Day
26 November 2013 – Game 12
27 November 2013 – Rest Day
28 November 2013 – Tiebreak games
29 November 2013 – Closing Ceremony

Live commentary on Playchess in English

Day
Round
Live Playchess commentary in English
Nov. 09
1
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 10
2
GM Daniel King + GM Yasser Seirawan
Nov. 12
3
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 13
4
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 15
5
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 16
6
GM Daniel King + GM GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 18
7
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 19
8
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward
Nov. 21
9
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 22
10
GM Daniel King + GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
Nov. 24
11
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 26
12
GM Chris Ward + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 28
Tiebreak
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward

Live commentary in other languages

Day
Round
French German Spanish
Nov. 09
1
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 10
2
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 12
3
GM Christian Bauer GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 13
4
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 15
5
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 16
6
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 18
7
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 19
8
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 21
9
GM M. Vachier-Lagrave GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 22
10
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 24
11
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 26
12
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 28
TB
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García

The commentary will commence around 30 minutes after the start of the games. The schedule and commentators may be changed before the start of the Championship on November 9th, with long and short castlings possible.

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site, with special coverage on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


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