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Chennai 05: First blood, what next?

11/15/2013 – Carlsen won, he has proven that he can obtain the kind of positions that he is strong in, and that even Anand cannot always hold positions which can technically be held b ut are very uncomfortable. The World Champion has been in this situation before but he will need to conjure up all his tricks tomorrow to be able to put on the pressure on the Challenger. Full analysis of today's round.
 

FIDE World Chess Championship Anand-Carlsen 2013

The FIDE World Chess Championship match between defending champion Viswanathan Anand and his challenger world number one Magnus Carlsen is taking place from November 9 to 28 2013 in the the Hyatt Regency, Chennai, India. The match is over twelve games, with time controls of 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move starting from move 61. The games start at 3:00 p.m. Indian Time, which is 4:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (New York), 10:30h Central European Time (Paris), 1:30 p.m. Moscow Standard Time. Find your local time here.

Round five video by GM Daniel King

Round five report by Alejandro Ramirez

And Carlsen wins. This is really all that matters. For Anand, though, it is also important to know what happened. If I had to describe what this game was, I would simply say it was a typical Carlsen game. He held the slightest of slight advantages t hroughout the game, but he kept making annoying and precise moves that kept his opponent thinking and possibly making mistakes until it happened. Anand's 45...Rc1+? is being considered as the losing mistake, but there was already pressure mounting in the position.

Power food might be the secret behind his success...

Focusing before the game. 7 minutes and 03 seconds before the game.

Playing Carlsen is not easy. It's not just that he is the best player in the world, its the way he is the best player in the world. He pushes all of his opponent's buttons until they crack. Today, this is what happened to Anand. Unfortunately, even the slightest of positional advantages means that Carlsen has something to play with, something to annoy you with. Sometimes - with perfect play, its possible to hold, but this is not easy for every player.

"Yeah, I did it"

Indeed it was maybe even more comfortable for Anand to hold the previous game as he was in a clear disadvatange but had to keep finding ways ot counterattack with the initiative. In this case, there was no clear plan, simply the task of finding exact moves. This can be too much for any player. This is the type of position Carlsen loves.

Friedel's analysis of an important game five:

[Event "FWCM 2013"] [Site "Chennai"] [Date "2013.11.15"] [Round "5"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D31"] [WhiteElo "2870"] [BlackElo "2775"] [Annotator "Josh Friedel"] [PlyCount "115"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] [TimeControl "40/7200:20/3600:900+30"] 1. c4 {Carlsen decides that he's had enough of 1. Nf3.} e6 2. d4 d5 {Vishy opts for the Queen's Gambit Declined, with which he won the decisive last game in his match against Topalov.} 3. Nc3 c6 {Psyche! Now it is a triangle Semi Slav.} 4. e4 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Bb4+ {Is Magnus going to take Vishy on in the main lines of the Marshall Gambit?} 6. Nc3 {Nope. This is a quieter option for White, but it has plenty of sting.} c5 7. a3 Ba5 8. Nf3 Nf6 9. Be3 Nc6 (9... Ne4 {is the main alternative, but now after} 10. Qc2 Nxc3 11. bxc3 cxd4 12. Bxd4 {I think White's piece activity and development more than compensate for the doubled c pawns.}) 10. Qd3 {Carlsen shows his homework. This move might look a bit funny but it has some logic to it. First off, he prepares to take back on c3 with the queen. Second, Taking on c5 is more favorable now, since Black will have to take on d3 before taking on c3, developing White's f1 bishop and taking the queens off will surely favor Carlsen. Finally, White has the options of Rd1 and 0-0-0.} (10. dxc5 Bxc3+ 11. bxc3 Qa5 {This is Black's usual idea for counterplay in such positions.} 12. Qc2 Ng4 13. Qc1 O-O 14. Be2 Nxe3 15. Qxe3 Ne7 16. O-O Nf5 17. Qe4 Qxc5 18. Rfd1 f6 19. Bd3 g6 20. h4 Ng7 21. Qd4 Qxd4 22. cxd4 Bd7 23. Be4 Rab8 24. Rab1 Rfc8 25. Bxb7 Rxc4 26. d5 Rc7 27. dxe6 Bxe6 28. Be4 Rxb1 29. Rxb1 Nf5 30. Rb8+ Kf7 31. a4 Nd6 32. Bd3 Rc8 33. Rb4 Rc3 34. Be2 Rb3 35. Rf4 Ke7 36. Nd4 Rb1+ 37. Kh2 Bd7 38. Nc2 a5 39. Bf3 Nf5 40. h5 g5 41. Rc4 Rc1 {1/2-1/2 (41) Polgar,Z (2560)-Portisch,L (2580) Budapest 1993}) 10... cxd4 11. Nxd4 Ng4 {It is worth losing time to go after the bishop on e3.} (11... Ne5 {is an interesting alternative.}) 12. O-O-O Nxe3 13. fxe3 ( 13. Qxe3 Bb6 {is not to be recommended.}) 13... Bc7 {In my opinion, this move is just a tad imprecise.} (13... O-O 14. Nxc6 bxc6 15. Qxd8 Bxd8 {looks similar, but Black has gained a tempo to get his king out of the center, which I think is a huge plus. Now if} 16. Be2 {as he played in the game, Black is in time.} Bb6 17. Rd3 e5 $1 18. Bf3 Bf5 {and Black has sufficient counterplay.}) 14. Nxc6 bxc6 15. Qxd8+ Bxd8 {Black has the two bishops, but White's development is superior and the c6 pawn will cause major problems.} 16. Be2 Ke7 (16... Bb6 {still looks like a better move.} 17. Rd3 (17. Bf3 Bxe3+ 18. Kb1 { looks like a lot of compensation, but at least Black has a pawn for his troubles.}) 17... Ke7 18. Bf3 Ba6 $1 {followed by Rad8 with counterplay.}) 17. Bf3 Bd7 18. Ne4 {It is clear something has gone wrong for Black. For the first time in the match, White has the advantage!} Bb6 {Vishy cashes in his two bishops for an opportunity to activate his rook on the b-file. Doesn't make sense? You'll see in a few moves.} (18... Bc7 19. Nc5 Be8 {looks depressing, but Black is still solid and the bishops may create counterplay eventually.}) 19. c5 f5 20. cxb6 fxe4 21. b7 $1 {Of course White doesn't allow Black to fix his pawn structure.} Rab8 22. Bxe4 Rxb7 {White's advantage may not look like much, but the weak c-pawn isn't going to be fixed anytime soon, so Black at least will have to suffer awhile here. This is exactly the type of position Carlsen wants. That being said, it is well in the drawing zone, and some real errors will have to be made for White to win.} 23. Rhf1 Rb5 24. Rf4 (24. Rd4 { I prefer this rook lift, as now e5 can be met by Rc4.}) 24... g5 (24... e5 25. Rf2 Be6 {and Black has untangled a bit. If} 26. Bxc6 $4 Rc5+ 27. Rc2 Rxc2+ 28. Kxc2 Rc8 {Black wins the bishop.}) 25. Rf3 h5 {This expansion doesn't do a whole lot.} 26. Rdf1 Be8 27. Bc2 Rc5 28. Rf6 $1 {This move paralyzes the e8 bishop and h8 rook in one go.} h4 29. e4 a5 30. Kd2 Rb5 31. b3 Bh5 32. Kc3 Rc5+ 33. Kb2 Rd8 34. R1f2 Rd4 {Vishy found activity like he often does, but there are still challenges to be solved. Black has some potential weaknesses, and if his activity fizzles he'll have real problems.} 35. Rh6 (35. Bb1 {is an attempt to be clever, though after} Rd2+ 36. Rxd2 Kxf6 {Black should have sufficient counterplay.}) 35... Bd1 36. Bb1 {It is important that White keep the bishops on the board, as with just rooks the advantage would completely disappear.} Rb5 37. Kc3 c5 38. Rb2 e5 39. Rg6 {With the rook on the 5th rank cut off, Magnus goes after Vishy's weakened kingside. Even so, Black has a lot of counterplay.} a4 (39... g4 {looks like the simpler path.} 40. Bd3 (40. Rh6 a4 $1 {is far better than the game.}) 40... Rxb3+ 41. Rxb3 Bxb3 42. Rxg4 c4 43. Be2 Kd6 44. Rxh4 Kc5 {with excellent counterplay for the pawn.}) 40. Rxg5 (40. bxa4 Rxb2 41. Kxb2 Bxa4 42. Rxg5 {and White has won a pawn, but his bishop on b1 is really sad.}) 40... Rxb3+ 41. Rxb3 Bxb3 42. Rxe5+ {This is similar, but White wins the very important e5 pawn.} Kd6 43. Rh5 Rd1 44. e5+ Kd5 45. Bh7 { Extremely precise play is required of Black now, and Vishy loses the thread.} Rc1+ $2 {Anand goes after the g-pawn, which isn't the correct approach.} (45... Ra1 {was necessary immediately, and now after} 46. Bg8+ (46. Rxh4 Rxa3 {is also drawn.}) 46... Kc6 47. Bxb3 Rxa3 48. Rxh4 Rxb3+ 49. Kc2 (49. Kc4 $4 Rb4+ { is not recommended.}) 49... Ra3 {and Black should draw comfortably due to superior king and pawns. Note that the e-pawn is a major weakness. A possible line would continue} 50. Kb2 Rb3+ 51. Ka2 Re3 52. Rxa4 Re2+ 53. Kb3 Rxg2 54. h4 Kd5 $11) 46. Kb2 Rg1 47. Bg8+ Kc6 (47... Kd4 {looks like a better attempt, but after} 48. Rxh4+ Kd3 (48... Kxe5 49. Bxb3 axb3 50. g3 {wins for White.}) 49. Rg4 (49. Rh3+ Kd4 50. Bxb3 axb3 51. Rh4+ Kd3 {with major counterplay.}) 49... Bxg8 50. Rxg8 Re1 51. Rd8+ Kc4 52. Rd2 {and White ought to win with the outside pasers now that Black's 2nd rank counterplay has stopped.}) 48. Rh6+ $1 {Precise, as he doesn't want Black to have Kd5 after the bishop trade.} Kd7 ( 48... Kb5 49. Bxb3 axb3 50. Kxb3 c4+ 51. Kc3 {is also lost.}) 49. Bxb3 axb3 50. Kxb3 Rxg2 51. Rxh4 {White's pawns are scattered, but he is up two of them and unlike in previous lines he has a good king!} Ke6 52. a4 {The a-pawn will become a menace very quickly.} Kxe5 53. a5 Kd6 54. Rh7 $1 {One last accurate move, and now it is over.} Kd5 55. a6 c4+ 56. Kc3 Ra2 57. a7 Kc5 58. h4 {and Black resigned since there is no defense to h5-h6-Rg7 and queening the pawn. Carlsen's advantage was microscopic for most of the game and Vishy was extremely close to a draw even towards the end, but one slip of 45... Rc1+ was enough to allow the world #1 to steal the point.} 1-0

The match isn't over yet, by any means, but Anand has to prove something tomorrow

So what next? Of course Anand can come back - he did agaist both Gelfand and Topalov. The match is far from over. But he should try to strike back soon. The following erudite opinion was given by GM Parimarjan Negi:

Tomorrow is psychologically a key game. Anand was worse with white in the last game and he lost today. He must at least prove that he can push Carlsen against the ropes, even if he doesn't give him a knock out blow.

The "Best Wishes" board is going to have a few more wishes for Anand coming up

In some positive news for Anand:

Well, its better than nothing.

Anand has been in this situation before, and he won both of those matches. It's all part of the plan, obviously.

Joshua Friedel

Josh was born in 1986 in New Hampshire, USA and is currently living in Wisconsin. He obtained his international master title in 2005 and his grandmaster in 2008. He has participated in five US Championships, including a tie for fourth in 2008. Major Open tournament victories include: the 2003 Eastern Open, 2005 Berkeley Masters, 2008 National Open, 2009 Edmonton International, 2009 North American Open, 2010 Saint Louis Open, 2010 American Open, 2013 Chicago Open.

Josh is the current US Open Champion and is the first person qualified for the 2014 US Chess Championship.

Report by Alejandro Ramirez, photos by Anastasiya Karlovich

Report in Hindi by Niklesh Jain:

पांचवे मैच में कार्लसन ने आनंद को किया पराजित ,3-2 से बनाई बढ़त

विश्व शतरंज चैंपियनशिप का पांचवा मैच भारत के लिए एक बुरी खबर ओर नार्वे के लिए खुशखबरी बन कर सामने आया । अपनी रणनीति को सही साबित करते हुए कार्लसन ने लगभग बराबर से लग रहे मैच में आनंद को पराजित करते हुए विश्व चैम्पियन बनने की ओर अपने कदम आगे बढ़ा दिये है । अब मौजूदा विश्व चैम्पियन विश्वनाथन आनंद किस तरह वापसी करते है इसी बात पर प्रतियोगिता का भविष्य निर्भर करेगा । कार्लसन ने आज पुनः लंबे चले एंडगेम में अपनी महारत सिद्ध करते हुए मौजूदा विश्व चैम्पियन आनंद की एक गल्ती का फायदा उठाते हुए उन्हे वापसी का कोई मौका नहीं दिया । मैच की शुरुआत आज कार्लसन ने अपने पिछले दो मैच से हटकर  1. c4 चाल चल कर की और आनंद  ने उनका जबाब e6  चलकर दिया । अगली कुछ चालों मे खेल क्वीन गेंबिट डिकलाइन में पहुँच गया । 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 c6 4.e4 dxe4 5.Nxe4 Bb4+ 6.Nc3 c5 7.a3 Ba5 8.Nf3 Nf6 9.Be3 Nc6 । ऐसा लग रहा था की आनंद एक बार फिर आसानी से मोहरो को बदलते हुए मैच को ड्रॉ की ओर मोड़ देंगे पर आज कार्लसन कुछ और ही ठान कर आए थे ।10.Qd3 !? कार्लसन ने अपने वजीर की इस चाल से कुछ नया प्रयोग करने के संकेत दिए । इससे पहले कभी भी शीर्ष स्तर पर इस चाल का प्रयोग नहीं किया गया था और कार्लसन की रणनीति आनंद को उनकी तैयारी से बाहर खींच कर लाने की थी और वो  इसमें आज पूरी तरह सफल साबित हुए। आगे का मैच कुछ इस तरह आगे बढ़ा 10.. cxd4 11.Nxd4 Ng4 12.0-0-0 !? एक बार फिर कार्लसन ने अपनी गहरी तैयारी का परिचय देते हुए क्वीनसाइड किलेबंदी करते हुए विशेषज्ञो को चौंका दिया । Nxe3 आनंद ने तुरंत अपने घोड़े से कार्लसन के काले खानो वाले ऊंट का बदलाव करते हुए काले खानो पर अपनी पकड़ बनाने का संकेत दिया । पर आनंद के मोहरे खास तौर पर उनके सफ़ेद खानो वाले ऊंट का खेल में अभी तक ना आना चिंता का विषय था।13.fxe3 Bc7?! आनंद इससे कहीं बेहतर d4 पर घोड़े को तुरंत बदलते हुए भी खेल को आगे बढ़ा सकते थे । इसके बाद की चालों में दोनों का एक एक घोड़ा और वजीर खेल से बाहर थे 14.Nxc6 bxc6 15.Qxd8+ Bxd8 16.Be2 Ke7?!अपने ऊंट को बंद करते हुए राजा की यह चाल सभी को हैरान कर गयी। आनंद के सभी मोहरे जंहा अंतिम पंक्ति मे आ गए थे और यह उनके लिए चिंता की बात थी । ।17.Bf3! इसके साथ ही कार्लसन ने आनंद के उपर दवाब बनाना शुरू कर दिया। आनंद का c6 पैदल अब कार्लसन के निशाने पर था । आनंद की समस्या अब बढ़ रही थी। आनंद के पैदल की पंक्ति बिखरी नजर आ रही थी और उनके मोहरो का अभी तक खेल में सही खानो पर न होना चिंताजनक था। 17..Bd7 18.Ne4 Bb6 19.c5 f5 !?आनंद ने अपने काले खाने के ऊंट को ना बचाते हुए उसके बदले कार्लसन का घोड़ा लेने का निश्चय किया।20.cxb6 fxe4 21.b7!कार्लसन ने शानदार चाल चलते हुए आनंद की पैदल की पंक्ति की स्थिति काफी खराब कर दी। हालांकि मैच अब भी बराबर था और आनंद के सही खेल खेलने पर बराबरी पर ही छूटने के आसार थे । Rab8 22.Bxe4 Rxb7 23.Rhf1 Rb5 24.Rf4 g5 25.Rf3 h5 26.Rdf1 Be8 27.Bc2 Rc5 28.Rf6 h4 29.e4 a5 30.Kd2 Rb5 31.b3 Bh5 32.Kc3 Rc5+ 33.Kb2 Rd8 34.R1f2 Rd4 35.Rh6 Bd1 36.Bb1 Rb5 37.Kc3 c5 38.Rb2 e5 39.Rg6 a4 40.Rxg5 Rxb3+ 41.Rxb3 Bxb3 इसके साथ ही आनंद ने अपने और कार्लसन के हाथी को बदलते हुए मैच के ड्रॉ होने की संभावनाए और बलशाली कर दी । हालांकि आनंद के किंगसाइड की पैदल जाती नजर आ रही थी पर उनके ऊंट हाथी और राजा की बेहतर अवस्था खेल को संतुलित किए हुए थी। 42.Rxe5+ Kd6 43.Rh5 Rd1 44.e5+ Kd5 45.Bh7 Rc1+?? और इसके साथ ही आनंद शायद कुछ चाल पढ़ना चूक गए और एक बड़ी गल्ती कर बैठे । आनंद कार्लसन की a3 पैदल को मारने की कोशिश करते हुए खेल का संतुलन बनाए रख सकते थे । पर शायद ये आज उनका दिन नहीं था। आगे 46.Kb2 Rg1 47.Bg8+ Kc6 48.Rh6+!! शानदार चाल और इसके साथ ही आनंद की हार तय हो गयी । Kd7 49.Bxb3 axb3 50.Kxb3 Rxg2 51.Rxh4 Ke6 52.a4 Kxe5 53.a5 Kd6 54.Rh7 Kd5 55.a6 c4+ 56.Kc3 Ra2 57.a7 Kc5 58.h4 और आनंद ने खेल में अपनी हार स्वीकार कर ली । विश्वनाथन आनंद के प्रशंसको के लिए बहुत निराशा का क्षण था। क्या आनंद एक बार फिर पिछली विश्व चैंपियनशिप की तरह वापसी कर पाएंगे ? क्या कार्लसन इस जीत का खुमार सम्हाल कर रख पाएंगे ? यह सवाल अब भविष्य का खेल तय करेगा। कार्लसन और उनकी टीम जंहा इस जीत से अपनी रणनीति और तैयारी पर खुश होगी । वंही आनंद को किसी भी तरह कार्लसन को मुख्य ओपेनिंग की तरफ खींचना होगा । अब देखना यह होगा कि आनंद और उनकी टीम इस बड़े झटके से कैसे उबरते है और वापसी करते है ।कल का मैच अब तक का सब से शानदार मैच होगा इसी  कामना के साथ...आपका निकलेश जैन । 

Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
Perf.
V. Anand 2775
½
½
½
½
0
             
2.0
2799
M. Carlsen 2870
½
½
½
½
1
             
3.0
2846

Tournament details

Schedule: the match will be played over a maximum of twelve games, and the winner of the match will be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the winner scores 6.5 points in less than 12 games then the closing ceremony will take place on the day after the World Championship has been decided or one day thereafter.

07 November 2013 – Opening Ceremony
09 November 2013 – Game 1
10 November 2013 – Game 2
11 November 2013 – Rest Day
12 November 2013 – Game 3
13 November 2013 – Game 4
14 November 2013 – Rest Day
15 November 2013 – Game 5
16 November 2013 – Game 6
17 November 2013 – Rest Day
18 November 2013 – Game 7
19 November 2013 – Game 8
20 November 2013 – Rest Day
21 November 2013 – Game 9
22 November 2013 – Game 10
23 November 2013 – Rest Day
24 November 2013 – Game 11
25 November 2013 – Rest Day
26 November 2013 – Game 12
27 November 2013 – Rest Day
28 November 2013 – Tiebreak games
29 November 2013 – Closing Ceremony

Live commentary on Playchess in English

Day
Round
Live Playchess commentary in English
Nov. 09
1
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 10
2
GM Daniel King + GM Yasser Seirawan
Nov. 12
3
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 13
4
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 15
5
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 16
6
GM Daniel King + GM GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 18
7
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 19
8
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward
Nov. 21
9
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 22
10
GM Daniel King + GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
Nov. 24
11
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 26
12
GM Chris Ward + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 28
Tiebreak
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward

Live commentary in other languages

Day
Round
French German Spanish
Nov. 09
1
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 10
2
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 12
3
GM Christian Bauer GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 13
4
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 15
5
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 16
6
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 18
7
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 19
8
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 21
9
GM M. Vachier-Lagrave GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 22
10
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 24
11
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 26
12
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 28
TB
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García

The commentary will commence around 30 minutes after the start of the games. The schedule and commentators may be changed before the start of the Championship on November 9th, with long and short castlings possible.

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site, with special coverage on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.

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