Chennai 04: The Tables Turned

11/13/2013 – With everything going right for the defending World Champion, it seemed that it was up to Carlsen to create something and prove that his game was up to par. And today he did exactly that. A slip from Anand allowed Carlsen to snatch a "poisoned pawn", but precise calculation allowed him to keep it and put the pressure on. Anand survived, through cunning and perseverance.

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FIDE World Chess Championship Anand-Carlsen 2013

The FIDE World Chess Championship match between defending champion Viswanathan Anand and his challenger world number one Magnus Carlsen is taking place from November 9 to 28 2013 in the the Hyatt Regency, Chennai, India. The match is over twelve games, with time controls of 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and then 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move starting from move 61. The games start at 3:00 p.m. Indian Time, which is 4:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (New York), 10:30h Central European Time (Paris), 1:30 p.m. Moscow Standard Time. Find your local time here.

Round four report by Alejandro Ramirez

The match started brilliantly for Anand. With three games played, Anand had neutralized one game with Black easily, slipped in the second and allowed equality, and completely outplayd Carlsen in the third despite that game ending in a draw. Today, the pattern has changed. Magnus Carlsen shows that he is here to fight and to make Vishy pay for his mistakes. The opening preparation was definitely in favour of the Norwegian, who repeated a variation favored by his second, Jon Ludvig Hammer.

Carlsen was finally in the driver's seat today

The position was already close to equal when Anand made his mistake. Did Anand miss the intrepid 18...Bxa2, or did he simply underestimate it? Grabbing the pawn seems completely unnatural, but it had to be checked. Black survived with his extra pawn and he was the one that had the chances to win through most of the game.

Anand defended well, and although he clearly was worse he was never in any decisive trouble

Clever and active play by Anand kept putting pressure on Carlsen, and although the Norwegian tried his best to set up problems for the Indian, and he tried to consistently trick his opponent in the endgame, Anand's active defense was sufficient to draw at the end.

"Lookin' fine"

Friedel's analysis of an exciting game four:

[Event "FWCM 2013"] [Site "Chennai"] [Date "2013.11.13"] [Round "4"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C67"] [WhiteElo "2775"] [BlackElo "2870"] [Annotator "Josh Friedel"] [PlyCount "127"] [EventDate "2013.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] [TimeControl "40/7200:20/3600:900+30"] 1. e4 e5 {Despite easily diffusing Vishy with the Caro-Cann, Magnus decides to switch back to his favorite response to 1. e4.} 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 {The berlin was one of the heavily anticipated openings before the match.} 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Bd7 10. Rd1 Be7 { Not the most common move, but it can't have come as a huge shock to Vishy, as the main proponent of this move is Carlsen's second Jon Ludwig Hammer.} (10... Kc8 {is a bit more common, but this allows the aggressive option} 11. g4 Ne7 12. Ng5 Be8 13. f4 {and despite Black's recent success here, it is easy to see why Magnus preferred to avoid this.}) 11. Nc3 (11. g4 {is still possible, but now Black responds with} Nh4 12. Nxh4 Bxh4 {and Black's pieces aren't quite as ridiculous as in the 10... Kc8 line. Even so, this was tried in Caruana-Grischuk just yesterday.}) 11... Kc8 12. Bg5 {This idea was played just once, but successfully by Jakovenko against Almasi. The trade of these bishops is often favorable for White, but it also makes it a bit easier for Black to coordinate.} h6 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Rd2 {All logical thus far, and following Jakovenko is the Berlin isn't a bad plan. It is very likely both players were still in prep.} c5 15. Rad1 {Finally a novelty! Doubling rooks on the d-file in the Berlin always looks rather nice, but it is not nearly as fun as it looks. Black tends to have all the squares covered as long as he can keep is light-squared bishop.} (15. Ne4 b6 16. Ng3 Bc6 17. Nh2 Ng6 18. Re1 Nf4 19. f3 Kb7 20. Kf2 Rad8 21. Rxd8 Rxd8 22. Nhf1 g6 23. Ne2 Ne6 24. Ne3 Bb5 25. Nc3 Rd2+ 26. Kg3 Bc6 27. Rd1 Rd4 28. Kf2 Kc8 29. Ne2 Rxd1 30. Nxd1 Nd4 31. c3 Kd7 32. Ne3 Nxe2 33. Kxe2 Ke6 34. f4 g5 35. g3 Be4 36. Ng4 gxf4 37. gxf4 h5 38. Nf6 Bg6 39. Kf3 c6 40. Ne8 f5 41. Nd6 h4 42. a4 Bh5+ 43. Ke3 Bd1 44. a5 bxa5 45. c4 Bb3 46. Kd3 Bd1 47. Ke3 Bb3 48. Kd3 Bd1 49. Nb7 Bf3 50. Nxc5+ Ke7 51. Nb3 Bg2 52. Nd4 Bxh3 53. Nxc6+ Kd7 54. Nd4 Bf1+ 55. Ke3 h3 56. Nf3 Bxc4 57. Kf2 Bd5 58. Kg3 h2 59. Nxh2 Kc6 60. Nf1 Kc5 61. Kf2 Kd4 62. Ng3 Be6 63. Nh5 Kd3 64. Ng7 Bc8 65. e6 Kc2 66. e7 Bd7 67. Nxf5 Kxb2 68. Nd6 a4 69. f5 a3 70. f6 a2 71. f7 a1=Q 72. f8=Q Qa2 73. Qf6+ Kc1+ 74. Kg3 Qb3+ 75. Kf4 Qb4+ 76. Ne4 Qb8+ 77. Kg5 Qb5+ 78. Kh4 Qb4 79. Qf4+ Kb2 80. Qe5+ Kb1 81. Kg5 a5 82. Nc3+ Kc2 83. Nd5 Qb5 84. Kh6 a4 85. Qe4+ Kb2 86. Qd4+ Kc2 87. Ne3+ Kb3 88. Qd1+ Kc3 89. Nd5+ Kc4 90. Ne3+ Kc3 91. Qc2+ Kd4 92. Qd2+ Ke4 93. Nc4 Qd5 94. Qe3+ Kf5 95. Qg5+ Ke4 96. Qe3+ Kf5 97. Qg5+ Ke4 98. Qg6+ Kd4 99. Nb6 Qh1+ 100. Kg7 Bc6 101. Qd6+ Ke3 102. Nd5+ {1-0 (102) Jakovenko,D (2710)-Almasi,Z (2691) Khanty Mansiysk 2007 CBM 122 [Marin,M]}) 15... Be6 (15... Bc6 {is almost always incorrect, as it allows White to play} 16. e6 $1 {and activate his pieces.}) 16. Ne1 $6 {I'm really not crazy about this move. It is common to move this knight in order to expand on the kingside, but the knight on d3 will just be too awkward.} (16. Ne2 {is a more standard move, but after} Ng6 {it isn't easy to come up with a plan for White.} (16... g5 {is playable also, but you risk running into h4 ideas later.}) 17. h4 $5 {is what I wanted to try, but after} (17. Ng3 Nf4 $1 { stops White in his tracks.}) 17... Bg4 18. Nh2 (18. e6 Bxe6 19. h5 Ne7 20. Nf4 Bg4 {also doesn't seem to do much.}) 18... Bxe2 19. Rxe2 Nxh4 20. e6 fxe6 21. Rxe6 Rd8 {and White's initiative has fizzled.}) (16. Ne4 {with similar play to the Jakovenko game might be White's best chance, though in my opinion the whole line needs to be rethought for White.}) 16... Ng6 17. Nd3 b6 18. Ne2 $6 { This was probably Anand's idea when he played 16. Ne1, but most probably he underestimated Black's next move.} (18. b3 {was probably best, but after} c4 19. bxc4 Bxc4 {only Black is the one fighting for advantage.}) 18... Bxa2 $1 { It takes some guts to snatch such pawns from the World Champion! Has the young man studied his classics, doesn't he know that Fischer proved you can't take a pawn like this? It turns out that the misplaced knight on d3 makes it not only possible, but quite strong.} 19. b3 c4 20. Ndc1 {Anand finds the best response. } cxb3 21. cxb3 Bb1 22. f4 (22. Rd7 {looks nice, but Black has the incredibly strong} Rg8 $3 {and White's play is totally shut down. Now if} 23. Rxf7 Nxe5 24. Re7 Nc6 {Black is up a pawn for 0 compensation.}) 22... Kb7 23. Nc3 Bf5 24. g4 Bc8 25. Nd3 {The dust has settled a bit, and while it is clear White has compensation for the pawn due to his kingside expansion and more active pieces, I don't think it is nearly enough for a clean pawn.} h5 $1 {A standard idea in the Berlin, activating the rook on h8 and creating pawn weaknesses.} 26. f5 Ne7 27. Nb5 (27. Rc2 {I prefer this more flexible move, planning Nb5 next move.}) 27... hxg4 (27... a6 {looks simpler, preventing any shenanigans.}) 28. hxg4 ( 28. Rc1 {looks like a more active try, but not necessarily a better one. Play would continue} Nd5 29. Nc5+ bxc5 30. Rxd5 gxh3 (30... Bxf5 {is not as clear after} 31. Rdxc5 Rac8 32. Nxc7 {with some serious counterplay in my view. Note how} gxh3 {would be an error due to} 33. Rb5# $1) 31. Rdxc5 h2+ 32. Kh1 Kb8 33. Nd4 Bb7+ 34. Nc6+ Kc8 35. Rd5 Bxc6 36. Rxc6 Rb8 37. Rdc5 Rb7 38. e6 fxe6 39. fxe6 {and White has some drawing chances but two pawns are two pawns.}) 28... Rh4 29. Nf2 Nc6 30. Rc2 {White's position is barely holding together, but it is difficult to cut the thread.} a5 {Despite the strange nature of this position, Carlsen still follows a Berlin theme, namely that it is often best to activate your rooks by pushing your rook pawns rather than trying to bring them to the center.} (30... a6 31. Rdc1 {doesn't help Black in the least.}) 31. Rc4 {a4 is prevented, and now Black's only real option is to break apart White's kingside.} g6 32. Rdc1 Bd7 33. e6 fxe6 34. fxe6 Be8 {It looks as if Black has untangled and solved most of his problems, but Anand proves this is not the case.} 35. Ne4 $1 {This move keeps White in the game. The threat is Nf6, and Nd6+ is often possible as well.} Rxg4+ 36. Kf2 Rf4+ (36... Rd8 {looks like a better try than the game continuation, but it still seems as if White can get enough counterplay. The following variation isn't completely forced, but it gives you an idea of how Black's advantage can fizzle out. Even so, I think this was the best chance.} 37. Ke3 Rg2 38. Nf6 Rg5 {The only move, as otherwise the e-pawn was getting too dangerous.} 39. Nxc7 Re5+ 40. Re4 Rxe4+ 41. Kxe4 Kxc7 42. e7 Ra8 43. Nxe8+ Rxe8 44. Kd5 Rxe7 45. Rxc6+ Kb7 46. Rxg6 { with a drawn rook ending.}) 37. Ke3 Rf8 38. Nd4 $1 {and just like that, Black's advantage is completely gone! White has a powerful e-pawn and more active pieces.} Nxd4 39. Rxc7+ Ka6 40. Kxd4 Rd8+ 41. Kc3 (41. Ke3 {and White shouldn't even be worse, but it is clear Anand's focus was on securing a drawn ending.}) 41... Rf3+ 42. Kb2 Re3 {Now Anand has to be careful again.} 43. Rc8 Rdd3 (43... Rxc8 44. Rxc8 Rxe4 45. Rxe8 {doesn't help Black, as White will trade e for g and draw quite easily.}) 44. Ra8+ Kb7 45. Rxe8 Rxe4 {There is a bit of fiddling now, but as long as Anand is careful about trading e for g there is nothing to fear.} 46. e7 Rg3 47. Rc3 Re2+ 48. Rc2 Ree3 49. Ka2 g5 50. Rd2 Re5 51. Rd7+ Kc6 52. Red8 Rge3 53. Rd6+ Kb7 54. R8d7+ Ka6 55. Rd5 Re2+ 56. Ka3 Re6 57. Rd8 g4 58. Rg5 Rxe7 59. Ra8+ Kb7 60. Rag8 a4 61. Rxg4 axb3 62. R8g7 Ka6 63. Rxe7 Rxe7 64. Kxb3 {and today the World Champion gets to breathe a sigh of relief! It was clear he was on the ropes, but I couldn't find any clear wins for Black, and perhaps he was just never winning. Nevertheless, for the first time in the match the world #1 was pressing the action, and it'll give Vishy something to think about during the rest day.} 1/2-1/2

Daniel King's analysis of game 4

The problem was that even deep analysis doesn't reveal any continuation in which surely Carlsen could have improved. There certainly were alternatives, and neither Yasser Seirawan, who I had the pleasure of doing the live commentary with today, really liked Carlsen's Rh4 move. a6 definitely smelled like the correct idea, but that being said, maybe White would also have obtained sufficient counterplay in that line.

Anand survives, and has taken no real damage. Tomorrow he can rest and prepare his strategy for the next couple of games. The players have swung at each other without causing harm, but things are starting to heat up.

The action shot!

Joshua Friedel

Josh was born in 1986 in New Hampshire, USA and is currently living in Wisconsin. He obtained his international master title in 2005 and his grandmaster in 2008. He has participated in five US Championships, including a tie for fourth in 2008. Major Open tournament victories include: the 2003 Eastern Open, 2005 Berkeley Masters, 2008 National Open, 2009 Edmonton International, 2009 North American Open, 2010 Saint Louis Open, 2010 American Open, 2013 Chicago Open.

Josh is the current US Open Champion and is the first person qualified for the 2014 US Chess Championship.

Report by Alejandro Ramirez, photos by Anastasiya Karlovich

Report in Hindi by Niklesh Jain:

शानदार खेल ,शानदार अनुभव , आनंद कार्लसन की चौंथी बाजी 64 चालोंमेफिर बराबर पर

छूटी दो नीरस मैच और फिर दो शानदार मैच मजा आ गया । कल के मैच का खुमार अभी उतरा भी नहीं था 

की आज के खेल ने सबका दिल जीत लिया । आज वाकई आनंद विश्व चैम्पियन की तरह खेले और 

कार्लसन ने भी दिखाया की उनसे बेहतर चेलेंजर कोई हो ही नहीं सकता था । बाजी भले ही बराबरी पर छूट 

गयी हो पर आज के खेल ने एक बार फिर सभी का दिल जीत लिया। इस मैच ने आज विश्व शतरंज 

प्रतियोगिता के सबसे प्रसिद्ध मैच फिशर –स्पासकी के मैच की यादें ताजा करा दी। आज आनंद सफ़ेद 

मोहरो से खेल रहे थे। कल की बाजी में जीत के काफी करीब पहुँचने के बाद सभी उनकी आज पहली चाल 

का इंतजार कर रहे थे । आनंद ने एक बार पुनः कार्लसन की तर्ज पर ही अपनी पहली चाल को दोहराते 

हुए 1.e4 पैदल चलते हुए खेल की शुरुआत की । अब सबकी निगाहे एक बार कार्लसन के जबाब की ओर 

थी जो पिछले मैच मे कारोकान खेलकर सबको चौंका चुके थे । कार्लसन ने e5 खेलकर आज कुछ ठोस 

खेलेने का संकेत दिया । अगली कुछ चालों मे  खेल राय लोपेज के बर्लिन डिफेंस मे पहुँच गया 2 Nf3 Nc6 3. 

Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 । आनंद और कार्लसन के 2011 के 

ग्रांड स्लाम फ़ाइनल के पहले चक्र में इसी लाइन मे खेल खेला गया था जो की ड्रॉ रहा था। अतः एक 

बात साफ हो चुकी थी की आगे का खेल शानदार होने वाला था। चूंकि दोनों खिलाड़ी निश्चित तौर पर 

तैयारी के तौर पर बराबर थे अब देखना ये था की आखिर कौन आज बोर्ड पर नयी चाल चलता है ।इस 

बार भी आनंद ने पहले 9वीं चाल में पहले तो जकोवेंकों और अलमासी के बीच 2007 वर्ल्ड कप में हुए मैच 

की तर्ज पर 9.h3 खेला जिसका मतलब भविष्य मे किंग्ससाइड पर पैदल की अधिकता का फायदा लेना 

था .Bd7 10. Rd1 Be7 11. Nc3 Kc8 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Rd2 c5 और फिर 15वीं चाल पर अपने पहली 

रेंक के हाथी को d1 पर लाते हुए एक बार फिर नावेल्टी चाल चली और खेल को पुरानी थ्योरी से बाहर कर 

दिया । वजीर के शुरुआत में ही खेल से बाहर हो जाने की वजह से यह साफ था की आज के खेल में एंड- 

गेम का काफी अहम रोल होगा ओर आज हुआ भी यही । कार्लसन ने Be6 चला तो ऐसा लगा की अपनी 

ओपेनिंग की कुछ समस्याओ का काफी हद तक समाधान हासिल कर लिया है । अचानक आनंद ने Ne1 

खेलते हुए अपनी f पैदल के आगे बढ्ने के संकेत दिए कार्लसन ने तुरंत अपने घोड़े को g6 पर लाते हुए 

f4 खाने पर अपनी पकड़ बनाने के साथ साथ e5 पर हमला करते हुए एक प्रकार से आनंद की पिछली चाल 

को गलत साबित करने की कोशिश की । पर आनंद ने तुरंत Nd3 खेलते हुए अपनी सोच को जारी रखा । 

कार्लसन ने जवाब अपनी c5 की पैदल को b6 से ज़ोर लगाते हुए दिया । और अब आया एतिहासिक लम्हा 

आनंद ने 18. Ne2 खेलते हुए सभी को अचरज मे डाल दिया । आज शायद उनके दिमाग मे कुछ और अलग 

चल रहा था जो शायद एक विश्व चैम्पियन ही सनझ सकता है । कार्लसन का 18..... Bxa2! फिशर की 

याद करा गया और उस मैच की तरह यह मैच भी काफी समय तक याद रखा जाएगा ।आनंद ने अगली कुछ 

चालों मे अपनी क्वीन साइड की एक पैदल कुर्बान कर दी । 19. b3 c4 20. Ndc1 cxb3 21. cxb3 Bb1 22. f4 

इसके साथ गौर करने वाली थी आनंद जंहा अपनी किंग्ससाइड की पैदल को आगे बढ़ा दबाब बना रहे थे 

वनही कार्लसन के मोहरो मे कल की ही तरह तालमेल को अभाव नजर आ रहा था । आगे की कुछ चालो 

में 22….Kb7 23. Nc3 Bf5 24. g4 Bc8 । और अब ठीक तीसरे मैच की तरह वजीर की जगह हाथी बोर्ड के कोने 

मे लगभग कैद हो गया था बस अंतर इतना था कल कार्लसन एक पैदल कम थे ओर आज आनंद । पर 

इसके बावजूद आनंद के मोहरे विशेषकर हाथी बेहतर खानों मे जगह बनाए हुए थे पर घोड़ो और पैदल के 

प्रयोग पर आगे का खेल निर्भर नजर आ रहा था । 25. Nd3 h5 ! कार्लसन को शायद अब जीत की गंध 

आने लगी थी वो अच्छे से समझ रहे थे की अगर वो अपने मोहरो को खेल मे लाने मे कामयाब हो गए तो 

इस मैच को वो जीत सकते है । . f5 Ne7 27. Nb5 !? इस चाल ने फिर सबको सोचने पर मजबूर कर दिया । 

hg4 के साथ ही कार्लसन ने अपने h8 हाथी को खेल में शामिल कर लिया । 28. hxg4 ?! आनंद यंहा और 

बेहतर Rc1 चल सकते थे ।( 28.Rc1 Nd5 29. e6 ! fe6 30.Ne5 !! ) 28……Rh4 29. Nf2 Nc6 30. Rc2 a5! बहुत ही 

शानदार चाल कार्लसन की मौजूदा स्थिति पर समझ का यह शानदार नमूना थी । जल्द ही वो अपने दूसरे 

हाथी को खेल मे लाने की तैयारी कर रहे थे । और यह आनंद के लिए चिंता की बात थी । 31. Rc4 g6! एक 

बार फिर कार्लसन ने पर स्थिति को समझकर शानदार चाल चली और लगा के शायद वे आज इस बाजी को 

जीतने के लिए प्रतिबद्ध है। पर आनद भी शानदार समझ का परिचय देते हुए 32. Rdc1 चलकर तुरंत 

जबाबी हमला शुरू कर दिया । 32. ….. Bd7 33. e6 fxe6 34. fxe6 Be8 ऐसा लगा के शायद अब आनंद के लिए 

बहुत देर के लिए खुद को सुरक्षित रखना मुश्किल होगा तभी उन्होने 35. Ne4!! खोजकर अपनी एक और 

पैदल कुर्बान करते हुए लगभग अपनी सभी समस्याओ का जैसे हल निकाल लिया और उनकी आंखे अब ड्रॉ 

को पहले ही देख चुकी थी । Rxg4+ 36. Kf2 Rf4+ 37. Ke3 Rf8 38. Nd4 Nxd4 39. Rxc7+ Ka6 40. Kxd4 Rd8+ 41. 

Kc3 !? जब शायद 99% लोग Ke3 सोच रहे थे ओर इंजन की मदद से खेल देखकर अपने अपने गुणा भाग 

लगा रहे थे आनंद की इस चाल ने जैसे सबको नींद से जगा दिया । आज एक विश्व विजेता ने यह दिखाया 

की वह इसका हकदार वाकई क्यूँ है ।41.... Rf3+ 42. Kb2 Re3 43. Rc8 Rdd3 44. Ra8+ Kb7 45. Rxe8 Rxe4। 

और इसके साथ ही यह तय हो गया की बाजी अब आज भी अनिर्णीत ही रहेगी । हालांकि कार्लसन ने अंत 

तक अपनी कोशिशे जारी रखी पर आनंद ने उन्हे कोई मौका नहीं दिया । और अंततः 64 चालों के बाद दोनों 

खिलाड़ी ड्रॉ पर सहमत हो गए ।

कुल मिलाकर आज दोनों खिलाड़ियो ने सबको इस बात का एहसास कराया की आखिर क्यूँ इस मैच को सदी 

का मैच कहा जा रहा है । एक दिन का विश्राम दोनों खिलाड़ियो को एक नयी ऊर्जा देगा । अगले मुक़ाबले 

में कार्लसन सफ़ेद मोहरो से अब क्या नया करेंगे और आनंद अपने खेल के स्तर और कितना उपर ले 

जाएंगे इस बात पर इस विश्व चैंपियनशिप का भविष्य निर्भर करेगा । आपका निकलेश जैन

 

Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
Perf.
V. Anand 2775
½
½
½
½
               
2.0
2870
M. Carlsen 2870
½
½
½
½
               
2.0
2775

Tournament details

Schedule: the match will be played over a maximum of twelve games, and the winner of the match will be the first player to score 6.5 points or more. If the winner scores 6.5 points in less than 12 games then the closing ceremony will take place on the day after the World Championship has been decided or one day thereafter.

07 November 2013 – Opening Ceremony
09 November 2013 – Game 1
10 November 2013 – Game 2
11 November 2013 – Rest Day
12 November 2013 – Game 3
13 November 2013 – Game 4
14 November 2013 – Rest Day
15 November 2013 – Game 5
16 November 2013 – Game 6
17 November 2013 – Rest Day
18 November 2013 – Game 7
19 November 2013 – Game 8
20 November 2013 – Rest Day
21 November 2013 – Game 9
22 November 2013 – Game 10
23 November 2013 – Rest Day
24 November 2013 – Game 11
25 November 2013 – Rest Day
26 November 2013 – Game 12
27 November 2013 – Rest Day
28 November 2013 – Tiebreak games
29 November 2013 – Closing Ceremony

Live commentary on Playchess in English

Day
Round
Live Playchess commentary in English
Nov. 09
1
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 10
2
GM Daniel King + GM Yasser Seirawan
Nov. 12
3
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 13
4
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 15
5
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 16
6
GM Daniel King + GM GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 18
7
GM Yasser Seirawan + GM Alejandro Ramirez
Nov. 19
8
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward
Nov. 21
9
GM Daniel King + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 22
10
GM Daniel King + GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
Nov. 24
11
GM Daniel King + GM Maurice Ashley
Nov. 26
12
GM Chris Ward + GM Simon Williams
Nov. 28
Tiebreak
GM Daniel King + GM Chris Ward

Live commentary in other languages

Day
Round
French German Spanish
Nov. 09
1
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 10
2
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 12
3
GM Christian Bauer GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 13
4
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 15
5
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Thomas Luther Leontxo García
Nov. 16
6
GM Fabien Libiszewski GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 18
7
GM Christian Bauer GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 19
8
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 21
9
GM M. Vachier-Lagrave GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 22
10
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 24
11
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 26
12
GM Yannick Pelletier GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García
Nov. 28
TB
GM Sebastien Mazé GM Klaus Bischoff Leontxo García

The commentary will commence around 30 minutes after the start of the games. The schedule and commentators may be changed before the start of the Championship on November 9th, with long and short castlings possible.

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site, with special coverage on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


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