Opening Encyclopaedia 2016

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5+0 Blitz tournament

– The classical blitz tournament starts at 8 pm. 5 minutes without increment, 9 rounds swiss system. View all events here!


Fritz 15 - English Version

New Fritz, new friend


ChessBase Magazine Extra 174

Learn openings from the classics with Sagar Shah; Andrew Martin presents the perhaps most important game of the World Championship 1972; Adrian Mikhalchishin gives a lecture on the Cozio Variation (each in video format). Plus 27.459 new games.


Evans Gambit for the new generation

The Evans Gambit is an attempt to destroy Black in gambit fashion straight out of the opening. Featuring games of old, and numerous new and exciting ideas, this DVD will give you a genuine and more exciting way of playing the Giuoco Piano.


ChessBase Magazine 174

Enjoy the best moments of recent top tournaments (Bilbao, Saint Louis and Dortmund) with analysis of top players. In addition you'll get lots of training material. For example 11 new suggestions for your opening repertoire.


How to exchange pieces

Learn to master the right exchange! Let the German WGM Elisabeth Pähtz show you how to gain a strategic winning position by exchanging pieces of equal value or to safely convert material advantage into a win.


ChessBase Magazine Extra 173

A solid concept against Benoni: Learn from GM Pert how to win with the Fianchetto Variation (video). Classics put to test: Robert Ris shows Fischer-Kholmov (1965) with an impressive knight sacrifice by the Russian (video). Plus 44,889 new games.


Master Class Vol.7: Garry Kasparov

On this DVD a team of experts gets to the bottom of Kasparov’s play. In over 8 hours of video running time the authors Rogozenko, Marin, Reeh and Müller cast light on four important aspects of Kasparov’s play: opening, strategy, tactics and endgame.


Books, boards, sets: Chess Niggemann

Bobby Fischer buried in Iceland

1/22/2008 – Chess legend Robert James Fischer, eleventh world champion, was laid to rest in the cemetery of Laugardalur Church outside the town of Selfoss, 60 km south of Reykjavik. Fischer, who died of kidney failure, had requested that only a handful of people be present at the funeral – amongst them Fischer's companion, Miyoko Watai. We bring you the wire reports and a statement by Garry Kasparov.
Opening Encyclopedia 2016

Opening Encyclopedia 2016

In chess, braving the gap often leads to disaster after a few moves. We should be able to avoid things going so far. The ChessBase Opening Encyclopaedia offers you an effective remedy against all sorts of semi-digested knowledge and a means of building up a comprehensive and powerful repertoire.


AP: Chess master Bobby Fischer buried
Reclusive chess genius Bobby Fischer has been buried in a private ceremony at a churchyard in southern Iceland, a television station has reported. Fischer, who died of kidney failure on Thursday at the age of 64, was interred at Laugardalur church outside the town of Selfoss, parish priest the Rev Kristinn Agust Fridfinnsson said. The funeral was attended by only a handful of people, including Fischer's companion, Miyoko Watai, and his Icelandic friend and spokesman Gardar Sverrisson. Full dispatch...

Fischer's grave in the Laugardalur churchyard outside Selfoss. Photo: Euruchess

Reuters: Chess champion Bobby Fischer buried in Iceland
Chess legend Bobby Fischer, who died in Iceland last week aged 64, was buried on Monday in a private ceremony near the city that hosted his famous victory over the Soviet Union's Boris Spassky 35 years ago. Fischer's spokesman, Gardar Sverrisson, said the American-born world chess champion was buried on Monday morning at a quiet ceremony attended by a few friends and his companion, Japanese chess player Miyoko Watai. The Catholic burial was held on a cold, bright day at a small country church near the southern Icelandic town of Selfoss, about 60 kilometers (37 miles) southeast of Reykjavik. One of the attendees, who declined to be identified, said Fischer had requested that only a handful of people be at his funeral. He died after an unspecified illness on Thursday in Reykjavik. Media reports have said he died of kidney failure. Full story...

Garry Kasparov statement on the death of Bobby Fischer

With the death of Bobby Fischer chess has lost one of its greatest figures. Fischer’s status as world champion and celebrity came from a charismatic and combative personality matched with unstoppable play. I recall thrilling over the games of his 1972 Reykjavik world championship match against Boris Spassky when I was nine years old. The American had his share of supporters in the USSR even then, and not only for his chess prowess. His outspokenness and individuality also earned him the quiet respect of many of my compatriots.

Fischer’s beautiful chess and his immortal games will stand forever as a central pillar in the history of our game. And the story of the Brooklynite iconoclast’s rise from prodigy to world champion has few peers for drama. Apart from a brief and peculiar reappearance in 1992, Bobby Fischer’s chess career ended in 1972. After conquering the chess Olympus he was unable to find a new target for his power and passion.

Fischer’s relentless energy exhausted everything it touched – the resources of the game itself, his opponents on and off the board, and, sadly, his own mind and body. While we can never entirely separate the deeds from the man, I would prefer to speak of his global achievements instead of his inner tragedies. It is with justice that he spent his final days in Iceland, the site of his greatest triumph. There he has always been loved and seen in the best possible way: as a chessplayer.

Garry Kasparov
Moscow – January 18, 2008

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