Beijing R02: Karjakin wins, leads.

7/5/2013 – Karjakin demolished Wang Hao's pirc with a brutal attack on the kingside. The Chinese tried to counterattack but it was too little, too late. The rest of the games were drawn, some of them relatively quickly. This gives Karjakin an early lead as he is the only one with a perfect score. Games, pictures and report.

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The fifth stage of the FIDE Grand Prix Series is taking place between the 3rd and 17th of July 2013 on the premises of the Chinese Chess Association in Beijing. The time controls are 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, 60 minutes for the next 20 moves and 15 minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move from move 61 onwards. The games start at 3 p.m. local time, except the last round. The Grand Prix Series consists of six tournaments to be held over two years (2012-2013). 18 top players participate in four of these six tournaments. The winner and second placed player overall of the Grand Prix Series will qualify for the Candidates Tournament to be held in March 2014.

Round 02 – July 05 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
1-0
Wang Hao 2752
Grischuk Alexander 2780
½-½
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
½-½
Kamsky Gata 2763
Topalov Veselin 2767
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Wang Yue 2705
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2773
Giri Anish 2734
½-½
Morozevich Alexander 2736

Showing good form Karjakin is now 2-0.

Karjakin, Sergey - Wang Hao 1-0
An unusual guest in top level practice, the Austrian attack of the Pirc gave White a clear advantage from the opening. His superior development allowed him to blast open the kingside. Black had to go for the counterattack on the opposite flank, where Karjakin's king was, but through some solid combination of defense and attack and clever tactics Karjakin took an important full point and the lead.

Analysis on this fabulous game by Karjakin by grandmaster Ipatov:

[Event "FIDE GP Beijing 2013"]
[Site "Beijing"]
[Date "2013.07.05"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Karjakin, Sergey"]
[Black "Wang, Hao"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B09"]
[WhiteElo "2782"]
[BlackElo "2746"]
[Annotator "A,Ipatov"]
[PlyCount "59"]
[EventDate "2013.??.??"]
[EventCountry "CHN"]

{This is the only game which did not finish in a draw in the second round.} 1.
e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. f4 Bg7 5. Bd3 {Less common than 5.Nf3.} e5 {Since
White doesn't have the Knight on f3 Black pushes e7-e5 himself.} 6. dxe5 dxe5
7. Nf3 (7. fxe5 {is worse because after} Ng4 8. Bb5+ c6 9. Qxd8+ Kxd8 {and
Black would get a nice outpost on e5.}) 7... exf4 8. Bxf4 O-O 9. Qd2 {White
has an isolated pawn on e4, but on the other hand Black is not able to block
it right away. Also White has nice attacking prospects on the kingside.} Nc6
10. O-O-O {Of course!} Be6 11. h3 {A good prophylactic move, White takes
control over square-g4, so Black won't be able to play Ng4 or Bg4.} Nd7 12. Bg5
$1 {White must play agressively,otherwise Black would obtain a comfortable
position after moving his Knight to e5.} Bf6 13. h4 h5 14. Qf4 {Increasing the
pressure. and threateaning to open up the h-file.} Bxg5 $6 {After this
exchange Black can hardly move his Knight to e5.} ({better was} 14... Nce5 $5 {
trying to exchange some pieces and reduce the White's dynamic potential.} 15.
Be2 Nxf3 16. gxf3 c6 {and Black might start his own attack with b7-b5-b4.}) 15.
hxg5 Qe7 16. Bb5 Nb6 17. Bxc6 bxc6 18. Ne5 Nc4 19. Nxc4 Bxc4 20. g4 $1 {White
is better coordinated so this is just the time for direct actions!} Rab8 21.
gxh5 Qb4 22. Rd4 (22. Na4 $1 {The engine considers this move as the quickest
way to victory} Qxa4 23. hxg6 fxg6 24. Qe5 $18 {and check on h8 comes. Black
cannot hold on in this position.}) 22... Qxb2+ 23. Kd2 Rfd8 24. Qf6 Rxd4+ 25.
Qxd4 {Black doesn't have any check, the Bishop is hanging and h5xg6 is coming.}
Qb6 26. Qxc4 Rd8+ 27. Kc1 Rd4 (27... Qe3+ 28. Kb1 Rb8+ 29. Ka1 {and the king
escapes}) 28. Qe2 Qc5 29. Nb1 Qxg5+ 30. Nd2 {Conclusion : A very convincing
victory by Sergei Karjakin! He didn't leave any chances to his opponent.} 1-0

 

 

 

Topalov, Veseiln - Leko, Peter ½-½
Topalov sacrificed a pawn early in this Queen's Indian defense to obtain powerful development and tactical chances against both Black's pieces and his somewhat exposed kingside. However Leko showed he is still a master of defense and after the very cunning 20...f6! he was able to stabilize his position, though at the cost of his extra pawn. The rook endgame was a very obvious draw.

Ivanchuk preferred the knights over the bishops in a closed position, but it was insufficient for an advantage.

Grischuk, Alexander - Ivanchuk, Vassily ½-½
A fight between Black's two knights against White's pair of bishops in a closed position didn't favor either side in this hedgehog. The position was too locked for the bishops to do anything while the knights didn't have the solid outposts they wanted. In the end Ivanchuk forced a strange perpetual on White's queen and the draw was agreed.

Wang Yue - Gelfand, Boris ½-½
Gelfand easily neutralized Wang Yue with the Gruenfeld and the players repeated moves very early in the game.

Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar - Kamsky, Gata ½-½
Kamsky's a6 Slav remains solid as Mamedyarov was unable to find a way to an advantage. After the simplification of the center White held no meaningful advantage and the game ended with Kamsky giving a perpetual on White's exposed king.

Kamsky got the dress code right. Almost.

Giri, Anish - Morozevich, Alexander ½-½
The game, as usual for Morozevich, was a strange French. This time again the Russian was able to obtain a fine position despite his unorthodox handling, and Giri decided best to force a repetition early on.

Giri started with two whites, but only half a point.

Information and pictures by FIDE press chief WGM Anastasiya Karlovich

Schedule and pairings

The games start at 9:00h European time, 11:00h Moscow, 3 a.m. New York. You can find your regional starting time hereThe commentary on Playchess begins one hour after the start of the games and is free for premium members. Time listed is the local round time in Beijing.

Round 01 – July 04 2013, 15:00h
Giri Anish 2734
0-1
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Morozevich Alexander 2736
½-½
Wang Yue 2705
Gelfand Boris 2773
0-1
Topalov Veselin 2767
Leko Peter 2737
½-½
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Kamsky Gata 2763
0-1
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
½-½
Wang Hao 2752
Round 02 – July 05 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
1-0
Wang Hao 2752
Grischuk Alexander 2780
½-½
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
½-½
Kamsky Gata 2763
Topalov Veselin 2767
½-½
Leko Peter 2737
Wang Yue 2705
½-½
Gelfand Boris 2773
Giri Anish 2734
½-½
Morozevich Alexander 2736
Round 03 – July 06 2013, 15:00h
Morozevich Alexander 2736
-
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Gelfand Boris 2773
-
Giri Anish 2734
Leko Peter 2737
-
Wang Yue 2705
Kamsky Gata 2763
-
Topalov Veselin 2767
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Wang Hao 2752
-
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Round 04 – July 07 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
-
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
-
Wang Hao 2752
Topalov Veselin 2767
-
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Wang Yue 2705
-
Kamsky Gata 2763
Giri Anish 2734
-
Leko Peter 2737
Morozevich Alexander 2736
-
Gelfand Boris 2773
Round 05 – July 09 2013, 15:00h
Gelfand Boris 2773
-
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Leko Peter 2737
-
Morozevich Alexander 2736
Kamsky Gata 2763
-
Giri Anish 2734
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
-
Wang Yue 2705
Wang Hao 2752
-
Topalov Veselin 2767
Grischuk Alexander 2780
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Round 06 – July 10 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Topalov Veselin 2767
-
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Wang Yue 2705
-
Wang Hao 2752
Giri Anish 2734
-
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Morozevich Alexander 2736
-
Kamsky Gata 2763
Gelfand Boris 2773
-
Leko Peter 2737
Round 07 – July 11 2013, 15:00h
Leko Peter 2737
-
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Kamsky Gata 2763
-
Gelfand Boris 2773
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
-
Morozevich Alexander 2736
Wang Hao 2752
-
Giri Anish 2734
Grischuk Alexander 2780
-
Wang Yue 2705
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
-
Topalov Veselin 2767
Round 08 – July 12 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
-
Topalov Veselin 2767
Wang Yue 2705
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Giri Anish 2734
-
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Morozevich Alexander 2736
-
Wang Hao 2752
Gelfand Boris 2773
-
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Leko Peter 2737
-
Kamsky Gata 2763
Round 09 – July 14 2013, 15:00h
Kamsky Gata 2763
-
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
-
Leko Peter 2737
Wang Hao 2752
-
Gelfand Boris 2773
Grischuk Alexander 2780
-
Morozevich Alexander 2736
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
-
Giri Anish 2734
Topalov Veselin 2767
-
Wang Yue 2705
Round 10 – July 15 2013, 15:00h
Karjakin Sergey 2776
-
Wang Yue 2705
Giri Anish 2734
-
Topalov Veselin 2767
Morozevich Alexander 2736
-
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
Gelfand Boris 2773
-
Grischuk Alexander 2780
Leko Peter 2737
-
Wang Hao 2752
Kamsky Gata 2763
-
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
Round 11 – July 16 2013, 15:00h
Ivanchuk Vassily 2733
-
Karjakin Sergey 2776
Wang Hao 2752
-
Kamsky Gata 2763
Grischuk Alexander 2780
-
Leko Peter 2737
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2761
-
Gelfand Boris 2773
Topalov Veselin 2767
-
Morozevich Alexander 2736
Wang Yue 2705
-
Giri Anish 2734

Links

The games will be broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


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