Antipov and Buksa are World Junior Champions

by Sagar Shah
9/21/2015 – The prestigious World Junior Championships 2015 witnessed intense fights right to the end. Duda and Abdumalik were leading in the open and girls section respectively for majority of the tournament, but thanks to a dramatic finish Mikhail Antipov and Nataliya Buksa snatched the titles. We have an interview with Antipov, and he also sent us a meticulously annotated game.

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Mikhail Antipov and Nataliya Buksa are World Junior Champions

World Junior Championships took place from the 31st of August to 16th of September 2015 in the city of Khanty Mansiysk, Russia. The Open group saw 62 players from 33 countries, including nine grandmasters and 22 International Masters. The average rating was 2351. The girls section witnessed 48 entries from 27 countries, with two International Masters and four WGMs taking part – average Elo 2154. It was a thirteen round event with one round every day and one rest day. The first eight rounds of the tournament were covered in a previous report on our newspage.

The last round of almost any tournament is filled with excitement; more so when the event is as important as the World Juniors. As the players took their seats in order to begin the final round it seemed like Jan-Krzysztof Duda was the clear favourite, leading the pack by a half-point margin, with a score of 9.5/12. Right on his heels was Mikhail Antipov with 9.0/12. The next player was on eight points and had no chance of fighting for the gold medal. Duda faced Benjamin Bok with the black pieces on the first board, while Antipov was white against Francesco Rambaldi on the second.

Benjamin Bok (left) with the white pieces was pressing throughout the game,
but Jan-Krzysztof Duda managed to salvage the half point

Mikhail Antipov won the final round game against Francesco Rambaldi, but not without drama

[Event "World Junior Open 2015"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2015.09.15"] [Round "13.2"] [White "Antipov, Mikhail Al"] [Black "Rambaldi, Francesco"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B12"] [WhiteElo "2538"] [BlackElo "2540"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "99"] [EventDate "2015.09.02"] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. Nd2 e6 5. Nb3 Nd7 6. Nf3 h6 7. Be2 Ne7 8. O-O g5 9. Ne1 Qc7 10. Nd3 Ng6 11. Bd2 O-O-O 12. a4 f6 13. exf6 Bd6 14. g3 Rdf8 15. Ndc5 Bxc5 16. Nxc5 Nxc5 17. dxc5 Bh3 18. Re1 Rxf6 19. Bg4 Bxg4 20. Qxg4 h5 21. Qxg5 Qf7 22. Qe3 e5 23. b4 Rf8 24. Rf1 h4 25. Qe2 e4 26. Bc3 Rf3 27. Bd4 Qd7 28. Kh1 Qg4 29. Rfe1 e3 30. Bxe3 hxg3 31. hxg3 {Diagram [#] Black is two pawns down but he has broken through to White's king. In this position there are many ways to win – the simplest is Qh3+ followed by Ne5-g4 or Rh8.} Nh4 ( 31... Qh3+ 32. Kg1 Ne5 $1 {defending the f3 rook and preparing Rh8.} (32... Rh8 33. Qxf3 $18) 33. Bf4 (33. Bh6 Rxf2 $19) 33... Rh8 $19) 32. Kh2 d4 $2 {After this move the win is no longer so clear.} (32... Nf5 $1 {A check on h8 and sacirifces on g3 loom large. There is absolutely no way to defend.} 33. Bg5 Qh5+ 34. Kg2 Nd4 $19) 33. Bf4 (33. Bxd4 Qxd4 $19) 33... Rxf2+ $2 {One mistake followed by another.} (33... R3xf4 {was relatively better but then the game would end in a draw with} 34. Qxg4+ Rxg4 35. Kh3 $1 Rg7 36. gxh4 Rf3+ 37. Kh2 Rxf2+ 38. Kh3 Rxc2 39. Rec1 Rcg2 40. Ra3 $15 {White has to defend accurately but it will be a draw.}) 34. Qxf2 Nf3+ 35. Kg2 Rxf4 {Black might have thought that this is a decisive attack, but Antipov shows that it can be easily parried.} 36. Re8+ Kd7 37. Rae1 Nxe1+ (37... Nh4+ 38. Kh1 $1 Rxf2 39. R1e7# { is the neat trick.}) 38. Qxe1 {It looks like there should be a direct win against the white king, but he is quite safe thanks to the g3 pawn. The black king, on the other hand, is completely exposed.} Rf7 (38... Qf3+ 39. Kg1 $18) 39. Rb8 Qf3+ 40. Kg1 Rf8 41. Rxb7+ Kc8 42. Rxa7 Kb8 43. Re7 Rd8 44. b5 {White has cleaned up the pawns and maintains complete control.} d3 45. Qe5+ Ka8 46. Ra7+ Kxa7 47. Qc7+ Ka8 48. Qxd8+ Kb7 49. Qd7+ Kb8 50. Qxd3 {A nice finish but Rambaldi must have been livid with himself for missing out on such a golden opportunity.} 1-0

As Duda drew his game and Antipov won his, the scores were tied at 10.0/13. The first tiebreak was their direct encounter. But Duda and Antipov had drawn their individual battle against each other in the ninth round. The next tiebreak was Buchholz which was also equal. The third tiebreak was able to resolve the issue, with Antipov having an extra point over Duda. Thus, the World Junior Champion was decided on the basis of the third tiebreak. That’s how close it was.

With 10.0/13, Mikhail Antipov became the World Junior Champion 2015

Jan-Krzysztof Duda led the tournament from the start but had to settle for the silver medal

One of the most talented players of Germany, Matthias Bluebaum, finished third and won the bronze medal

After the tournament ended, Mikhail Antipov was kind enough to give us an interview. Here is what he had to say:

Sagar Shah: The last round was extremely crucial for you. You were trailing Duda by half point and found yourself in a completely lost position.

What was going through your mind at this point? And what did you think after your opponent’s not so accurate move 32…d4?

Mikhail Antipov: Around ten moves earlier I understood that my position was very bad and I just need to play confidently and keep a calm mind in order to have some practical chances. When I got to this position I thought that it isn't easy for him to find the right way to play. After his inaccurate 32…d4 and my move 33.Bf4 I felt a bit relaxed, because I was sure that I will make a draw at the very least.

SS: How does it feel to be the World Junior Champion? Did you expect that you would win the gold medal when you set foot in Khanty Mansiysk?

MA: It was a big surprise for me that I became World Junior Champion – it is still hard for me to believe this! When I came to this tournament my goal was to do my best. I thought that a place in top three in such a long and strong tournament will be good for me.

SS: Whom would you like to dedicate this victory to?

MA: I would like to dedicate this victory to all the fans of creative and interesting chess!

Antipov opened five out of his six white games with 1.e4 and loves to play attacking chess

SS: Did you make any special preparations prior to the tournament?

MA: Before this tournament I tried to improve my fitness as much as possible, because it was always hard for me to keep good concentration during such a long event.

SS: You played some amazing attacking games, like the one against Jorden van Foreest and Daniel Yuffa. Which was your favourite game from the event?

MA: My favourite game was against Jorden van Foreest. I think it is the best game that I have played in my life. [Ed: The following game with annotations was sent to us by Antipov]

[Event "WJCC 2015"] [Site "?"] [Date "2015.09.10"] [Round "8.3"] [White "Antipov, Mikhail Al"] [Black "Van Foreest, Jorden"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C54"] [WhiteElo "2538"] [BlackElo "2541"] [Annotator "Mikhail Antipov"] [PlyCount "53"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. O-O O-O 6. c3 d5 (6... d6 {is another way to play this position.}) 7. exd5 Nxd5 8. b4 Be7 9. b5 Na5 10. Bxd5 (10. Nxe5 Bf6 11. f4 Nxc3 $1 12. Nxc3 Qd4+ $15 {has been scoring dismally for White.}) 10... Qxd5 11. c4 Qd7 $5 (11... Qd8 $6 12. Bd2 e4 13. Bxa5 exf3 14. Qxf3 a6 15. a4 $1 $14 axb5 16. axb5 $14 Bb4 $2 17. Bxc7 {That's one of the reasons why the queen is not well placed on d8.}) 12. Nc3 (12. Bd2 e4 13. Bxa5 exf3 14. Qxf3 a6 $15 15. a4 Rd8 $1 16. Rd1 axb5 17. axb5 Bb4 $17) 12... f6 $6 ( 12... b6 $5 13. Nd5 (13. Nxe5 Qd4 14. Bd2 Qxe5 (14... Bd6 $1 15. Nf3 Qxd3 $17) 15. Re1 Qd6 16. Nd5 Bd8 17. Bb4 Qd7 18. Bxf8 Kxf8 19. Re5 $36) 13... Bd6 14. Bd2 c6 15. bxc6 Nxc6 $15) 13. Nd5 Bd8 14. Ba3 Re8 15. Rc1 $5 (15. Qa4 $2 b6 $1 $17) (15. Rb1 $6 a6 16. b6 cxb6 17. Nxb6 (17. Rxb6 $5 Qf7 $15) 17... Bxb6 18. Rxb6 e4 19. Rd6 Qf7 20. dxe4 Nxc4 21. Rd8 Bg4 $17) 15... a6 $1 {Black is already better. The position is opening up and the two bishops are going to get into the game.} 16. b6 $5 cxb6 $2 (16... c6 $5 {followed by Bxb6 would have been better though White retains compensation.} 17. Ne3 Bxb6 18. c5 Bc7 19. Bb4 $44) 17. Nd2 f5 18. f4 e4 $6 (18... exf4 19. Qf3 $36) (18... b5 $5) 19. Re1 b5 $6 (19... exd3 20. Qh5 Re2 $1 (20... g6 $2 21. Qh6 Qf7 22. Rxe8+ Qxe8 23. Nf3 d2 24. Nxd2 $18) 21. Rxe2 dxe2 22. Qxe2 Qf7 $13) (19... e3 $2 20. Nf3 $16) 20. dxe4 fxe4 $2 (20... Qf7 $1 $13) (20... Nxc4 21. Nxc4 bxc4 22. Rxc4 $14 ) 21. Nxe4 Nxc4 {Diagram [#] The position is completely crazy. White is a pawn down but that is hardly the most important factor here. His development is better. Look at the rook on a8 and the bishop on c8. White must do something quickly.} 22. Qh5 $1 Re6 (22... Nxa3 23. Nef6+ $18 {[%cal Ge1e8]}) (22... g6 23. Qh6 $1 Qf7 24. Nef6+ Bxf6 25. Nxf6+ Qxf6 26. Rxe8+ Kf7 27. Qf8#) 23. f5 $3 (23. Rcd1 Qf7 24. Ndf6+ Bxf6 25. Nxf6+ Qxf6 $19) 23... Qxd5 (23... Re5 24. Nd6 $1 $18 (24. Ng5 Bxg5 25. Rxe5 Nxe5 26. Rc7 Qd8 (26... Bd8 27. Rxd7 Bxd7 28. Bb2 $18) 27. f6 $18) 24... Rxe1+ (24... Nxa3 25. Rxe5 $18) 25. Rxe1 Nxd6 26. Bxd6 $1 $18 {There is absoutely no way to prevent Re8#.}) 24. Ng5 $1 (24. Nf6+ gxf6 25. Rxe6 Bb6+ 26. Rxb6 Bxf5 27. Rd1 Qe5 28. Rxb7 $18) (24. fxe6 $4 Qxh5 $19) 24... Bxg5 (24... Rxe1+ 25. Rxe1 Bb6+ 26. Kh1 Bxf5 27. Re8+ Rxe8 28. Qxe8#) 25. Qe8+ $3 {A very nice finish.} Rxe8 26. Rxe8+ Kf7 27. Rf8# 1-0

SS: What do you study in your academic career?

MA: I am studying educational psychology in RSUH (Russian State University for Humanities)

SS: Now that you are a World Junior champion, how does your life change and what are your future plans?

MA: I will try to do my best in chess, improve my skills and solve the problems in my play.

SS: Who do you think will win the World Cup in Baku?

MA: I think Caruana has good chances to win this tournament.

SS: Thank you Mikhail for answering the questions for our readers.

Top final standings (after 13 rounds)

Rk. SNo Ti. Name FED Rtg Pts.  TB1   TB2   TB3  Rp rtg+/-
1 8 GM Antipov Mikhail Al. RUS 2538 10.0 0.5 96.0 103.0 2724 30.6
2 1 GM Duda Jan-Krzysztof POL 2645 10.0 0.5 96.0 102.0 2730 13.3
3 5 GM Bluebaum Matthias GER 2580 9.0 0.0 94.0 99.5 2621 7.8
4 28 IM Loiseau Quentin FRA 2419 8.5 0.0 90.0 93.5 2559 29.5
5 9 GM Bajarani Ulvi AZE 2535 8.0 0.0 98.5 104.5 2597 10.5
6 6 IM Van Foreest Jorden NED 2541 8.0 0.0 95.0 101.0 2585 7.4
7 4 GM Bok Benjamin NED 2586 8.0 0.0 94.0 100.5 2599 2.0
8 7 IM Rambaldi Francesco ITA 2540 8.0 0.0 93.5 99.0 2560 3.2
9 39 IM Akash G IND 2382 8.0 0.0 92.0 97.0 2522 25.8
10 20 IM Yuffa Daniil RUS 2476 8.0 0.0 91.5 96.5 2524 9.4
11 15 GM Abasov Nijat AZE 2511 8.0 0.0 89.5 95.5 2547 6.1
12 14 IM Tari Aryan NOR 2518 8.0 0.0 88.0 93.0 2547 4.7
13 29 IM Tran Tuan Minh VIE 2417 8.0 0.0 88.0 91.5 2547 27.0
14 11 IM Pichot Alan ARG 2528 8.0 0.0 87.0 93.0 2499 -4.7
15 3 GM Grigoryan Karen H. ARM 2609 7.5 0.0 95.5 101.5 2554 -9.1
16 27 IM Ali Marandi Cemil Can TUR 2422 7.5 0.0 91.5 94.0 2500 17.1
17 16 FM Gordievsky Dmitry RUS 2511 7.5 0.0 90.5 95.5 2518 1.2
18 10 IM Chigaev Maksim RUS 2531 7.5 0.0 88.5 94.0 2471 -10.0
19 25 IM Laurusas Tomas LTU 2429 7.5 0.0 86.5 91.5 2448 5.8
20 35 IM Johansson Linus SWE 2400 7.5 0.0 83.0 88.0 2491 16.0
21 32 IM Iskandarov Misratdin AZE 2405 7.5 0.0 82.0 87.0 2446 10.3

Girls section

In the girls section we had a surprising winner. At the half way stage it was WGM Zhansaya Abdumalik who was cruising towards the finish line with a score of 7.5/8, as previously reported. A draw in the ninth round was followed by two losses to Alina Bivol and Dorsa Derakhshani. Her tournament ended with a win against WIM Ulviyya Fataliyeva in the penultimate round and a draw with Alexandra Makarenko in the last game. In that game against Makarenko she was pushing throughout. A victory would have given her the title because in the direct encounter she had beaten Nataliya Buksa. But she wasn’t able to break through. Zhansaya scored 9.5/13, gained ten Elo points and finished third. But it was nowhere as spectacular as her 7.0/7 start.

Bronze medal for the prodigious Zhansaya Abumalik from Kazakhstan

Alina Bivol from Russia won the silver medal

Alina’s best achievement in this tournament was her tenth round victory over Zhansaya Abdumalik. When the Kazakh was unbeaten and running away with the tournament it was this Russian who stopped her. Pay special attention to the natural opening mistake committed by Zhansaya in the game below.

[Event "World Junior Girls 2015"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2015.09.12"] [Round "10.1"] [White "Bivol, Alina"] [Black "Abdumalik, Zhansaya"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A33"] [WhiteElo "2321"] [BlackElo "2380"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "117"] [EventDate "2015.09.02"] 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 e6 6. g3 Qb6 7. Ndb5 Ne5 8. Bf4 d6 $6 {Black does not have so much time after developing her queen on the sixth move. White now smoothly finishes her development.} (8... Nfg4 $1 {is the critical move.} 9. Qa4 {has been played recently in many top level encounters.} (9. e3 a6 10. h3 axb5 11. hxg4 Qc6 12. Bxe5 Qxh1 13. Nxb5 Bb4+ 14. Bc3 Bxc3+ 15. Nxc3) 9... g5 10. Bxe5 Qxf2+ 11. Kd1 Nxe5 12. Nc7+ Kd8 13. Nxa8 Qd4+ 14. Kc2 Nxc4 15. e4 {This is all pretty forced. At this point, Karjakin forgot his theory against Nakamura and instead of Qd2+ played Ne3+ and quickly lost the game.} Qd2+ {This correct way to draw was shown by Peter Leko against Samuel Shankland.} (15... Ne3+ $2 16. Kb3 $16 {1-0 (27) Nakamura,H (2776) -Karjakin,S (2760) Zuerich 2015}) 16. Kb3 Qxb2+ 17. Kxc4 Bg7 18. Qa5+ b6 19. Qxg5+ f6 20. Qb5 Ba6 21. Qxa6 f5 22. Qxa7 Qxc3+ 23. Kb5 {1/2-1/2 (23) Shankland,S (2661)-Leko,P (2713) Tsaghkadzor 2015} Qc6+ 24. Ka6 Qa4+ 25. Kb7 Qxe4+ 26. Ka6 Qa4+ $11) 9. Bg2 Nfg4 10. O-O $16 {White has no developmental issues and he could 0-0 without any problems. To get such a substantial advantage in just ten moves against the tournament leader was great news for Alina Bivol.} a6 11. Na4 Qd8 12. Na3 Ng6 13. Bc1 Be7 14. Qd4 e5 15. Qb6 O-O 16. h3 Nf6 17. Qxd8 Bxd8 18. Be3 Nd7 19. Rfd1 Bc7 {Diagram [#] What should White play?} 20. c5 $1 {When ahead in development you should, of course, open the position.} Nxc5 21. Nxc5 dxc5 22. Bxc5 $16 Re8 23. Nc4 e4 24. Bb6 Bxb6 25. Nxb6 Rb8 26. Rac1 Be6 27. Bxe4 Bxh3 28. f3 Be6 29. Nd7 Rbd8 30. Nc5 Rxd1+ 31. Rxd1 Bxa2 32. Bxb7 a5 33. b3 Nf8 34. Rd2 Bb1 35. Bd5 Bf5 36. Ra2 h5 37. e4 Be6 38. Rxa5 Bxd5 39. exd5 Rd8 40. Ne4 Rb8 41. Nc5 Rd8 42. Nb7 Rd7 43. Rb5 Nh7 44. Kf2 g5 45. d6 Kf8 46. Rb6 Nf6 47. Nc5 Rd8 48. Rc6 Ke8 49. b4 Rb8 50. b5 g4 51. b6 Kd8 52. b7 Nd7 53. Nxd7 Kxd7 54. Rb6 Ke6 55. fxg4 hxg4 56. Ke3 f6 57. Kd4 f5 58. Kc5 Kd7 59. Rb4 {With this nice victory, Alina was able to stop Zhansaya's strong run in the tournament.} 1-0

The player of the tournament in the girls section was definitely the 19-year-old Ukrainian Nataliya Buksa who started as the 23rd seed and won the event with a score of 10.0/13.

World Junior girls champion 2015 – Nataliya Buksa

Nataliya also gained 88 Elo points for her effort. She beat a lot of strong players like Andrea Rodriguez, Bayarjargal Bayarmaa, Alina Bivol, Andrea-Cristina Navrotescu, Dinara Saduakassova and Sabina Ibrahimova – all rated higher than her. She drew her last three games and emerged as the champion.

Though Nataliya played many fine games in the tournament, I think the one which represents her style very well is the one she won against the silver medalist Alina Bivol.

[Event "World Junior Girls 2015"] [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"] [Date "2015.09.06"] [Round "5.2"] [White "Buksa, Nataliya"] [Black "Bivol, Alina"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B90"] [WhiteElo "2199"] [BlackElo "2321"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "51"] [EventDate "2015.09.02"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 {The English Attack is one of the most aggressive ways to play against the Najdorf Variation.} e6 { Going for the Scheveningen setup. Another way is to play ...e5 here.} 7. f3 Be7 8. Qd2 O-O 9. O-O-O b5 10. g4 {Opposite side castling and pawns storming down the board, this is what we call exciting chess!} Bb7 11. g5 Nfd7 12. h4 Nc6 13. Nxc6 Bxc6 14. Ne2 (14. h5 Ne5 15. f4 Ng4 16. Bh3 Nxe3 17. Qxe3 {with a complex position.}) 14... Ne5 (14... d5 {is a possibility. A sample line could go something like this} 15. Nd4 Bb7 16. h5 dxe4 17. Nxe6 fxe6 18. Qxd7 Bd5 19. Rxd5 exd5 20. Qe6+ Kh8 21. h6 $1 $18) 15. Nd4 Bd7 $6 (15... Qc7 $142) 16. h5 Rc8 17. Kb1 {Always a useful move. Now a queen taking on c2 as in the game will not result in a mate.} Qc7 18. Rg1 Nc4 19. Bxc4 Qxc4 20. f4 (20. g6 $5 fxg6 21. hxg6 h6 22. Bxh6 $5 $40) 20... e5 21. Nf5 Rfe8 (21... Bxf5 22. exf5 Rfe8 23. f6 $40) 22. Nxe7+ Rxe7 23. Qxd6 Qxc2+ 24. Ka1 Rce8 25. f5 $1 Bc8 ( 25... Bc6 26. Rc1 Qxe4 27. Bb6 Bb7 28. Bd8 $1 $18) 26. Qxe7 $1 {The back rank weakness decides the game. The entire game was played with such a free flow. It's a game which every attacker would like to boast about.} (26. Qxe7 Rxe7 27. Rd8+ Re8 28. Rxe8#) 1-0

If you are interested to learn the aggressive English Attack which was used by Nataliya to beat her opponent then you must definitely look into the latest ChessBase DVD by Daniel Gormally:

English Attack by Daniel Gormally

The English Attack against the Najdorf and the Scheveningen is one of the most exciting and entertaining variations in modern chess. The line, developed in the 1980s by the English top players John Nunn and Nigel Short, was a mainstay of such chess legends as Garry Kasparov and Vishy Anand, and is now also a favourite of players of the younger generation such as Fabiano Caruana and Alexander Grischuk.

On this instructive DVD English Grandmaster Daniel Gormally, himself an accomplished attacking player, explains the most important lines of this fascinating system. Gormally demonstrates that the English attack is not a one-dimensional opening although in many lines White is happily hacking away on the kingside. This DVD shows how White can combine strategic ideas with attacking flair to use the English attack as a deadly weapon against the Sicilian defence.

Gormally believes that adding the English attack to your repertoire will straight away improve your results. It is the kind of opening that rewards hard work – you are more likely to get more interesting positions than in the anti-Sicilian lines, while playing and studying this opening will also improve your understanding of chess.

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Top final standings (after 13 rounds)

Rk. SNo Title Name FED Rtg Pts.  TB1   TB2   TB3  Rp
1 23 WFM Buksa Nataliya UKR 2199 10.0 0.0 97.0 99.0 2448
2 8 WIM Bivol Alina RUS 2321 9.5 1.0 90.0 94.5 2387
3 4 WGM Abdumalik Zhansaya KAZ 2380 9.5 0.0 100.0 105.5 2438
4 2 WGM Saduakassova Dinara KAZ 2409 9.0 1.0 93.5 99.0 2340
5 3 IM Ziaziulkina Nastassia BLR 2401 9.0 0.0 97.0 103.5 2388
6 16 WIM Derakhshani Dorsa IRI 2244 8.5 0.0 94.0 99.0 2353
7 6 WGM Mammadzada Gunay AZE 2355 8.0 1.5 92.0 97.5 2317
8 19 WFM Makarenko Alexandra RUS 2229 8.0 1.0 93.0 95.0 2287
9 10 WIM Fataliyeva Ulviyya AZE 2301 8.0 0.5 85.0 90.0 2270
10 34   Gaboyan Susanna ARM 2107 7.5 0.0 95.5 101.5 2305
11 43 WFM Nguyen Thi Thuy Trien VIE 1939 7.5 0.0 94.0 99.5 2331
12 15   Drogovoz Irina RUS 2253 7.5 0.0 91.5 97.5 2262
13 13 WFM Navrotescu Andreea-C. FRA 2263 7.5 0.0 87.0 92.0 2283
14 21 WIM Ibrahimova Sabina AZE 2215 7.5 0.0 87.0 89.0 2235
15 11 WFM Khomeriki Nino GEO 2296 7.5 0.0 85.5 90.0 2285
16 9 WIM Osmanodja Filiz GER 2309 7.5 0.0 83.0 85.0 2213
17 28 WCM Amrayeva Aytan AZE 2145 7.5 0.0 76.5 78.5 2203
18 5 IM Rodriguez Rueda Paula Andrea COL 2358 7.0 0.0 85.5 91.0 2207
19 1 WGM Aulia Medina Warda INA 2417 7.0 0.0 79.0 84.5 2191
20 29 WFM Saranya J IND 2144 7.0 -1.0 72.5 74.5 2119

Picture gallery

The champions, Mikhail Antipov and Nataliya Buksa, in a relaxed chat after an intense 13-round tournament

Quentin Loiseau finished fourth with a score of 8.5/13. Earlier in the year we had reported about this talented French player, when he had won the Lucopen in Lille.

Fifth: GM Ulvi Bajarani of Azerbaijan

Jorden van Foreest, who finished sixth, became Netherland’s latest grandmaster

Seventh: Benjamin Bok played a huge role in determining the World Junior Champion
by drawing against Duda in the last round

Eight: Francesco Rambaldi let the eventual champion, Mikhail Antipov, escape in the last round
with a full point from a position where he had an advantage of nearly five points

Ninth: Akash Ganesan from India had a good tournament as he scored 8.0/13 and gained 25 Elo points

Tenth: Daniel Yuffa from Russia

The only player from China Bai Jinshi didn’t do so well and finished 30th

GM Jorge Cori missed the World Cup 2015 to participate in the World Juniors.
He had maybe the worst tournament of his life as he scored 7.0/13, losing 35 Elo points.

GM Karen Grigoryan from Armenia was one of the favourites, but had to be content with the 15th spot

Aleksandra Goryachkina didn’t fare so well in the open section, finishing 34th and losing 17 Elo points

In the Girls Section Dinara Saduakassova finished fourth…

….ahead of Nastassia Ziazulkina. Dinara and Nastassia both scored 9.0/13
but the tiebreaks favoured the former because…

….in the clash between the second and third seeds, it was Dinara (right) who emerged victorious

Sixth: WIM Dorsa Derakhshani from Iran had a great event, scoring 8.5/13,
gaining 80 Elo points, and climbing to 2357 on the live rating list

Seventh: Gunay Mammadza from Azerbaijan

Eighth: Alexandra Makarenko from Russia

Can the thumb bear the weight of all those variations in her head?!

Chess can be exhausting and brutal

Bus transport was provided by the organizers …

… so that the participants reached the playing hall on time

A final goodbye to Khanty Mansiysk which organized the World Junior Championships in a very professional and efficient manner

Pictures from the official website by Maria Emilianova and Vladimir Barsky

 


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The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the chess server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase 12 or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.


Sagar Shah is an International Master from India with two GM norms. He is also a chartered accountant and would like to become the first CA+GM of India. He loves to cover chess tournaments, as that helps him understand and improve at the game he loves so much. He is the co-founder of the ChessBase India website.
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KevinC KevinC 9/21/2015 06:40
@Riccardo, both win handily per the computer. There is nothing to explain since it is just a matter of choice. Now that the N is on e5, Rh8 and Qh1 is a winning threat.

Nh4 is great, but in either case, white can delay his execution briefly, ...Nh4; gh Qh4; Bg5 (I know, stupid), Qg5 Kf1. Indeed, had black played Qh3 Kg4 Nh4, white probably would have resigned, maybe even sooner than after Ne5.

riccardo riccardo 9/21/2015 02:09
I'm sorry, but on Antipov-Rambaldi above, after 31) ... Qh3+ 32) Rg1 Nh4 - instead of Ne5 - how is white going to save the checkmate on g2 ? On 33)Qf1 then Rxg3+ 34)fxg3 Rf1+ and checkmate on g2 if instead 33) gxh4 then Rg8+ and checkmate next. If 33) Qxf3 then Nf3. What am I missing ?
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