2016 Baku Rd6: India takes sole lead in Open!

by Albert Silver
9/9/2016 – With the field at the top winnowed down to a handful the matches of the day were of paramount importance. The big match between Holland and India was epic: The Dutch started strong on all boards, but the Indians rallied and emerged victorious. The Ukrainians, who had shared the lead, faced Team USA, and it was Caruana's victory over Eljanov that decided their fate. The Women's event was no less dramatic as the Ukrainians squandered a sure win to draw with Russia, while China was held to a draw by Romania. Here is the report with instructive notes by GM Elshan Moradiabadi.

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2016 Baku Olympiad

All games start at 3 p.m. local time = 1 p.m. in Europe (CEST), one hour earlier in Britain, and 2 p.m. in Moscow. You can find the starting time at your location here.

Watch it live on Playchess!

Round six

The sixth round saw players refreshed, walking with a slightly lighter step, having enjoyed not only a well-deserved rest day, but also the famous Bermuda Party. What is the Bermuda Party you might ask? Try to imagine a humongous bash with alcohol galore, snacks, music and over a thousand chess players, and you have the chess player’s dream. It is the Revenge of the Nerds in style. You know those stories of chess nerds being ostracized in normal high school environments, while the more ‘normal’ crowd is partying. This is the antithesis. And a joyous bash it is!

Many players will come all the way to the Olympiad for the sole purpose of the Bermuda Party, and one look at the one in Baku shows why. The timing is especially well-chosen as it falls the night before the rest day, so that those who over-indulged have the chance to recover… (click image for high-res)

Here are the Indians enjoying the day off. You may have read the cheerful account by IM Sagar Shah.

The Russian delegation also enjoyed a nice lunch together (photo by B. Dolmatovski)

As well as a nice day at the beach. Here Sergey Karjakin enjoys some beach volleyball with Natalija Pogonina. (photo by B. Dolmatovski)

The rest day came at a perfect time, since the midpoint is clearly where the heaviest action is going to take place. This isn’t to suggest the last rounds are in any way less important, but this is when the leaders are most likely going to meet. After that, whatever the standings, it will be a race to see who outscores who, but now is when the grudge fight between the leaders takes place.

Leyla Aliyeva, daughter of the Azerbaijan president, and well-known socialite in her country, plays the opening move for the cameras on Magnus Carlsen's board. It may seem incredible to read, but Magnus was in deep trouble in his game and can consider himself fortunate to have drawn. What was surprising is that his opponent was... (photo by David Llada)

... GM Julio Sadorro from the Philippines, rated 2560, but far from a rating one would expect Carlsen to break a sweat over. (photo by Paul Truong)

At this point, the Open section had three teams left with unblemished scores: Ukraine, Netherlands, and India. The four top seeds, Russia, USA, China, and Azerbaijan, had all drawn or lost a match by now. Ukraine came carrying the greatest momentum, if only because they had just defeated the almighty Russians and then the Chinese. For that reason alone, they were the team to beat.

A glimpse at the massive playing hall. In the center at the bottom, you can make out the Georgian team, and slightly aboe to the right is Caruana facing Eljanov with Hikaru Nakamura watching, knowing it is all down to his colleague now. (click on the image for a high-res look) (photo by Paul Truong)

Their opponents in round six were none other than the American Dream Team, and if they passed this hurdle, it seemed as if nothing could hold them. Note that small, but rather important ‘if’. Boards two, three, and four were essentially good scores for them, draws against the American players. This is by no means to besmirch the Ukrainians in any way, but there was no question they were still the underdogs in spite of their previous successes.

It came down to board one, where Fabiano Caruana faced Pavel Eljanov, a former Top 10 himself, and who had shined especially brightly in his last visit to Baku during the World Cup when he started with 6.0/6 and earned almost 40 Elo by the end. (photo by David Llada)

Fabiano Caruana - Pavel Eljanov (annotated by Elshan Moradiabadi)

The King is dead, long live the king!? Not quite. While it was a setback for the Ukrainians, there are still five rounds to go, but so far no one is running away with the tournament. Even when China took a historic gold in Tromso in 2014 they had drawn three of their matches on the way. As to the US team, they move up to sole second with only a single drawn match conceded, but now is the true test of fire as they meet all the leaders, such as China, Russia, and tomorrow: India.

While Russia has been playing catchup after the unexpected loss in round four to Ukraine, one player who has been helping greatly in that mission is Ian Nepomniachtchi, who is the top-scoring player in the evennt so far with 6.0/6! (photo by David Llada)

The other top match of the day was between the two other leaders: India and Holland, and what a campaign both have had until now. While it is true, the Netherlands had not faced the list of top teams Ukraine had contended with, the one they did face, England, they carpet bombed. Belligerant war metaphor? How else should one describe a match where the no.11 beats the no.6 by a score of 3.5-0.5? Furthermore, their board one player, Anish Giri, whose results had not been terribly awe-inspiring of late, had scored a fantastic 4.0/5, and there was nothing drawish about his play.

With 4.0/5, Anish Giri is turning on the heat at precisely the right time: when his team needs him the most. He has played solid, but enterprising chess, and has been rewarded for his efforts so far. (photo by M. Emelianova)

India's team has something few others have as deeply: a team spirit that is second to none. The players are friends, supportive, and have a positivity that you cannot fake. This is not to suggest it is to make up for technical deficiencies at the board, but rather that somehow the sum is greater than the parts. On board one is Pentala Harikrishna, rated 2752, and no one could descirbe as anything less than elite. He faced three 2700+ players with no losses, and defeated Mamedyarov when the latter seemed unstoppable. WHile he is that cneter no one can knock down, the heavy scorers have been GM Adhiban and Gujrathi. How heavy?

After six rounds, Vidit Gujrathi is on 5.5/6 with a staggering 2951 performance, and five of those opponents were grandmasters. (photo by David Llada)

Nevertheless, the hero of the day was Baskaran Adhiban, who scored the key victory. Adhiban, rated 2671, is currently on 5.0/6 with a superb 2820 performance. (photo by David Llada)

Erwin L'Ami - B. Adhiban(annotated by Elshan Moradiabadi)

[Event "42nd Olympiad Baku 2016 Open"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2016.09.08"] [Round "6.2"] [White "L'Ami, Erwin"] [Black "Adhiban, B."] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E33"] [WhiteElo "2611"] [BlackElo "2671"] [Annotator "GM Elshan Moradiabadi"] [PlyCount "132"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventCountry "AZE"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [WhiteTeam "Netherlands"] [BlackTeam "India"] [WhiteTeamCountry "NED"] [BlackTeamCountry "IND"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] {India-Netherlands was the crucial match of round six. The winner of this match would take the sole lead in the event at this point. In what turned out to be a close match, Erwin L'Ami's decisive blunder turned out to be the pivotal factor in India's victory.} 1. d4 {(0s)} Nf6 {(0s)} 2. c4 {(0s)} e6 { (0s)} 3. Nc3 {(0s)} Bb4 {(0s)} 4. Qc2 {(17s)} Nc6 $5 {(0s) Interesting and rare choice but Adhiban.} 5. Nf3 {(109s)} d6 {(0s)} (5... O-O 6. Bd2 (6. a3 Bxc3+ 7. Qxc3 d6 8. Bg5 (8. b4 e5 $1 {This is a famous and interesting gambit}) 8... h6 9. Bh4 g5 10. Bg3 Ne4 11. Qc2 f5 12. h3 Nxg3 13. fxg3 Qf6 14. e3 e5 15. d5 e4 16. dxc6 exf3 17. cxb7 Bxb7 18. O-O-O Rab8 19. Re1 Be4 20. Qc3 Qxc3+ 21. bxc3 Rb1+ 22. Kd2 Rb2+ 23. Kc1 Rfb8 24. gxf3 Rc2+ 25. Kd1 Rb1# {0-1 (25) Duenas,A (1936)-Benjamin,J (2583) ICC INT 2009}) 6... d5 {was another possible option.} (6... d6 {transposes})) 6. Bd2 {(114s)} Qe7 {(46s)} 7. a3 {(144s)} Bxc3 {(8s)} 8. Bxc3 {(7s)} a5 {(4s) Black has to prevent White from further expansion on the queenside.} 9. e3 {(243s)} (9. e4 e5 10. d5 Nb8 11. c5 Nbd7 12. cxd6 cxd6 13. Nd2 O-O 14. Be2 Nc5 15. b4 axb4 16. axb4 Rxa1+ 17. Bxa1 Na6 18. Qb3 Bg4 19. f3 Bd7 {1/2-1/2 (45) Carlsen,M (2776)-Ivanchuk,V (2779) Nice 2009}) 9... O-O {(35s)} 10. Bd3 {(211s)} h6 $146 {(433s) I don't know what the point of this novelty is. Maybe it was Adhiban's improvisation.} 11. O-O { (137s)} e5 {(232s)} 12. d5 {(619s)} ({I prefer} 12. Nd2 Bd7 13. Rae1) 12... Nb8 {(63s)} 13. Nd2 {(42s)} a4 {(274s) Adhiban manages to fix the pawn structure on the queenside, however, White is ahead in development and opens up the game in the center!} 14. f4 $1 {(314s)} Nbd7 {(30s)} 15. Rae1 {(295s)} Re8 {(45s)} ( 15... Nc5 16. fxe5 dxe5 17. Bb4 {Looks bad}) 16. Bf5 {(515s)} (16. Ne4 Nxe4 17. Bxe4 Nf6 18. Bf3 {is equally strong and worthy of consideration. I do not believe that Black would want to touch his e-pawn in any case. A move which will leave White with a monster on c3.}) 16... c6 {(997s) Counter intuitive as it opens the game in White's favor. Nevertheless, Black needs to do something!} 17. dxc6 {(603s)} bxc6 {(1s)} 18. Ne4 {(26s)} Nxe4 {(330s)} 19. Bxe4 {(31s)} Ra6 {(313s)} 20. Rd1 $6 {(156s) After this prosaic move, white's advantage starts to fizzle out.} (20. c5 $1 Nxc5 (20... dxc5 {is just too 'ugly'.} 21. h3 c4 22. Qe2 Nc5 23. Qxc4 Nxe4 (23... Be6 24. Qe2) 24. Qxe4 Qb7 25. Rd1 f5 (25... Bd7 26. Bxe5) 26. Qc4+ Be6 27. Qc5 exf4 28. Rxf4 { [#] Botvinnik would be so happy to see this position. He believed that if you have opposite colored bishops when you have the initiative it is as you were already a piece up in your attack!}) 21. Bh7+ Kh8 22. fxe5 Nb7 (22... dxe5 23. Bb4 $18) 23. exd6 Nxd6 24. Bd3 {And I doubt whether Black can keep his head above water for long.}) 20... Nf6 {(466s)} 21. Bf3 {(356s)} c5 $1 {(188s) No more c5 for White! Black gives away the less relevant square of d5 to shut down White's bishop on c3.} 22. Rxd6 $6 {(186s) L'Ami senses the danger and transforms the position into an endgame with equal but unbalanced material. Nevertheless, he still makes Black's task easier. It would have been better if he had kept the tension in this position.} Rxd6 {(697s)} 23. fxe5 {(9s)} Rd7 { (164s)} (23... Rdd8 {should lead to the same thing as in the game.}) 24. exf6 { (81s)} Qxe3+ {(2s)} 25. Kh1 {(239s)} Qd3 {( 294s) almost forced.} 26. Qxd3 { (225s)} Rxd3 {(1s)} 27. fxg7 { [#] (17s) White has two pawns for the sacrificed exchange, nevertheless, Black can always return the exchange and get a position in which he has a slight edge. Therefore despite the engines screaming equality, it is Black who enjoys the better practical chances.} Ba6 {(532s)} 28. Bc6 {(285s)} Re2 {(309s)} 29. Bd5 {(139s)} Re7 {(128s)} 30. Bf6 {(108s)} Re8 { (64s)} 31. Rc1 {(151s)} Re2 {(497s)} 32. Kg1 {(49s)} Red2 {(116s)} 33. Bf3 { (92s)} Re3 {(65s)} 34. Bc3 {(107s)} Rd6 {(46s)} 35. Bd5 {(47s)} Re7 {( 34s)} 36. Rd1 $4 {(194s) And finally L'Ami blunders in an absolutely equal position. } (36. Rb1 Bc8 (36... Bb7 37. b4) 37. h3 Be6 38. Re1 Re8 (38... Red7 39. Bf6 { and White is better}) 39. Kf2 Red8 40. Bxe6 Rxe6 41. Rxe6 fxe6 42. Ke3 Rd1 43. Ke4 Kf7 $11) (36. h3) 36... Bxc4 {(4s)} 37. Bf3 {(181s) L'Ami missed:} (37. Bxf7+ $4 Rxf7 38. Rxd6 Rf1#) 37... Rxd1+ {(2s)} 38. Bxd1 {(8s)} Bb5 {(3s) The endgame is winning despite the fact that Black still has some work to do to force White's resignation.} 39. Bf3 {(301s)} Re6 {(33s)} 40. Kf2 {(0s)} Bc6 {(0s)} 41. Bg4 {(664s)} Rd6 {(27s)} 42. Be5 {(358s)} Rd2+ {( 30s)} 43. Ke3 {(6s)} Rxg2 { (7s)} 44. h3 {(17s)} h5 {(390s)} 45. Bd1 {(202s)} (45. Bxh5 Rg5 $19) 45... h4 { (166s)} 46. Kf4 {( 255s)} Bd7 {(70s)} 47. Bf3 {(104s)} Rg1 {(130s)} 48. Bf6 { (41s)} Rf1 {(162s)} 49. Ke3 {(23s)} Bxh3 {(139s)} 50. Bxh4 {(21s)} Kxg7 {(6s)} 51. Bc6 {(76s)} Rb1 {(29s)} 52. Bxa4 {(18s)} Rxb2 {(39s)} 53. Be7 {(28s)} c4 { (12s)} 54. Bb4 {(31s)} Kg6 {(31s)} 55. Kd4 {(79s)} Be6 {(88s)} 56. Kc3 {(286s)} Ra2 {(12s)} 57. Bc6 {(47s)} f5 {(34s)} 58. a4 {(33s)} f4 {(137s)} 59. a5 {(15s) } Kf5 {(13s)} 60. Bb7 {( 145s)} Ke5 {(34s)} 61. a6 {(5s)} Bd5 {(22s)} 62. Bc5 { (2s)} f3 {(56s)} 63. Bd4+ {(37s)} Kd6 {(37s)} 64. Bxd5 {(37s)} Kxd5 {(4s)} 65. a7 {(4s)} Kc6 {(66s)} 66. Kxc4 {(19s)} Kb7 {(3s) A painful defeat for Erwin and a good victory for Adhiban, whom Caissa likes very much these days!} 0-1

A heartbreaking loss for the Dutch player, whcih at the same time had Indian fans around the world cheering, not believing their nation has taken the sole lead. Of course... now comes the wave of elite teams, starting with the US in round seven. (photo by M. Emelianova)

The Azeri team seems to have lost a bit of their mojo after their loss to India in round five. They were in danger of losing to Greece in round six had it not been for fourth board Eltaj Safarli's key win to save the draw. (photo by David Llada)

China is another top team on the comeback (so to speak) after taking a hit from Ukraine. In round six they beat Argentina, though not unscathed as the South American team drew blood when Sandro Mareco unexpectedly beat Wang Yue on board one. (photo by David Llada)

Eric Hansen (Canada) - Andrei Zhigalko (Belarus)

White would be the first to agree it had not been his best game (a polite way of saying he was in big trouble), but he played his opportunistic best and was rewarded when Black fell for a trap he had set. White to play and win.

28.e5!! and Black loses the bishop since either 28...dxe5 or Bxe5 is met with the dsicovered check 29.Nxe6+! and the black queen is lost.

IM Semetey Tologontegin hails from Kyrgyzstan, a small former Soviet republic, deeply mountainous and located in central Asia between Kazakhstan on the north (south of Russia) and China to the south. Although the men have mostly adopted western style clothes, the traditional Kolpok hat, worn by all the Kyrgyz players, remains their traditional standout to this day. (photo by David Llada)

After a bitter defeat to the Dutch, the English team has been hitting back with a vengeance and has defeated Vietnam and Chile by 3-1 scores. Both David Howell and Nigel Short were on the lineup in round six. Round seven will be a do-or-die round possibly as they face the powerful Chinese team. (photo by David Llada)

The mammoth playing hall also has mammoth displays so that spectators and players can follow the action on the other boards. (photo by Paul Truong)

GM Eugenio Torre from the Philippines is on a record 23rd participation in an Olympiad (photo by David Llada)

The Women’s event saw their own clash of the titans with the much awaited match between Russia and Ukraine, the two sole leaders left by round six. It was an extremely tense match with crazy swings all over. By all means Ukraine should have taken the day considering the board positions. This is not due to their players holding ‘an advantage’ but rather outright winning games. Somehow, things did not quite pan out however, and the wiley Russians managed to save the day through resourcefulness, and not a bit of luck.

An example of the former came in the following game between GM Valentina Gunina and Mariya Muzychuk. It was an absolute massacre, and White was staring at a minus 10 score by the engines. Really. White set up a clever tempter as the time control approached, a last desperate try, and a few moves later, Black fell for it and the game was saved. See for yourself:

Valentina Gunina (Russia) - Mariya Muzychuk (Ukraine)

[Event "42nd Olympiad Baku 2016 Women"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2016.09.08"] [Round "6.2"] [White "Gunina, Valentina"] [Black "Muzychuk, Mariya"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D70"] [WhiteElo "2520"] [BlackElo "2539"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventType "team-tourn"] [EventCountry "AZE"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [WhiteTeam "Russia"] [BlackTeam "Ukraine"] [WhiteTeamCountry "RUS"] [BlackTeamCountry "UKR"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] 1. d4 {(00:00)} Nf6 {(00:00)} 2. c4 {(00:00)} g6 {( 00:00)} 3. f3 {(00:12)} d5 {(00:00)} 4. cxd5 {(00:19)} Nxd5 {(00:05)} 5. e4 {(00:22)} Nb6 {(00:05)} 6. Nc3 {(00:40)} Bg7 {(00:09)} 7. Be3 {(00:08)} Nc6 {(00:09)} 8. d5 {(05:55)} Ne5 { (00:10)} 9. f4 {(01:16)} Ng4 {(00:19)} 10. Bb5+ {(20:04)} Bd7 {(00:14)} 11. Qxg4 {(01:59)} Bxc3+ {(00:36)} 12. bxc3 {(00:04)} Bxb5 {( 00:03)} 13. Bd4 { (02:36)} Rf8 {(02:12)} 14. f5 {(09:33)} Qd7 {(05:03)} 15. Nf3 {(05:06)} gxf5 { (01:20)} 16. exf5 {(03:50)} Bd3 {(15:05)} 17. Qg3 {(13:42)} Qxf5 {(09:43)} 18. Ne5 {(07:26)} Ba6 {(03:48)} 19. O-O-O {(09:40)} Nxd5 {(01:58)} 20. c4 {(08:07)} Nb4 {(17:48)} 21. Qb3 {(00:51)} f6 {(16:59)} 22. Nf3 {(07:53)} Nc6 {(01:36)} 23. Be3 {(00:27)} Qg4 {(09:25)} 24. Nd4 {(00:45)} Ne5 {(01:17)} 25. h3 {(00:52) } Qg8 {(00:42)} 26. Qa4+ {(00:28)} c6 {(00:32)} 27. Bh6 {(00:31)} Bxc4 {(08:28) } 28. Rhe1 {(00:28)} Bxa2 {(01:45)} 29. Kb2 {(00:37)} Bd5 {(00:48)} 30. g4 { (00:20)} Rf7 {(01:44)} 31. g5 {(00:44)} Qg6 {(00:28)} 32. Ka1 {(00:04)} Nd3 { [#] (00:55)} 33. Re6 $1 {(00:55) The exclamation point is not because it changes the situation in any way, but with a -10 evaluation (really), this at least sets up a trap Black should have known better than to fall for. Move 40 was looming though, and one must presume adrenaline played no small part in this.} Nc5 {(00:29)} 34. Qb4 {(00:19)} Nxe6 {(01:48)} 35. Qxb7 {(00:32)} Rd8 $4 {(00:09) Finally missing the right continuation.} 36. Nxe6 $3 {(00:37) Yes, now it is a draw.} Bxe6 {(01:25)} 37. Qxc6+ {(00:08)} Bd7 {( 00:18)} 38. Rxd7 { (00:03)} Rxd7 {(00:44)} 39. Qc8+ {(00:07)} Rd8 {(00:03)} 40. Qc6+ {(00:00)} Rd7 {(00:00)} 41. Qc8+ {(00:08)} 1/2-1/2

The real clincher though was the last game running between Russian Olga Girya and Ukrainian Anna Ushenina. Olga Girya had had a large advantage in most of the game, but had squandered it and the position was effectively balanced and equal. As time eroded away, the position got out of control. Everyone watched it closely. Here the Russian team captain Sergey Rublevsky clearly was praying to whatever chess gods were willing to listen. (photo by M. Emelianova)

By no small miracle, the Ukrainian began to lose control of her position, and Olga Girya (above) seized her chance with a fury and won the day, saving the match for a 2-2 draw. (photo by David Llada)

As to the Chinese, they let Hou Yifan rest this round, no doubt expecting a painless victory, and were instead rewarded with a shock draw with Romania.

Among those who have helped make the live broadcasts such a pleasure to watch, is Anna Rudolf, ever-smiling and ever-spunky, with her enjoyable presentations. (photo by David Llada)

Anastasiya Karlovich has been conducting interviews also shared during the live transmissions (photo by M. Emelianova)

Speaking of whom, Maria Emelianova has been an invaluable source of fine portraits during the coverage, many of which you will find in the reports. (photo by David Llada)

About GM Elshan Moradiabadi

Elshan Moradiabadi is a GM born and raised in Tehran, Iran. He moved to the US in 2012. Ever since, he has been active in US college chess scenes and in US chess.

Elshan co-authored "Chess and the Art of War: Ancient Wisdom to Make You a Better Player" with Al Lawrence. He has also published written articles for ChessBase, and edited opening materials for fellow authors.

Elshan Moradiabadi is a veteran instructor and teaches chess to every level, with students ranging from beginners to IM. He can be contacted for projects or teaching at his email.

You can contact him at his email or follow him on Twitter.

Round six games (with times per move)

Select games from the list below the board

Open section (top pairings)

Bo.
9
India (IND)
Rtg
-
11
Netherlands (NED)
Rtg
2½:1½
1.1
GM
Harikrishna, P.
2752
-
GM
Giri, Anish
2755
½-½
1.2
GM
Adhiban, B.
2671
-
GM
L'Ami, Erwin
2611
1-0
1.3
GM
Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi
2669
-
GM
Van Wely, Loek
2674
½-½
1.4
GM
Sethuraman, S.P.
2640
-
GM
Bok, Benjamin
2592
½-½
Bo.
2
United States of America (USA)
Rtg
-
5
Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
2½:1½
2.1
GM
Caruana, Fabiano
2808
-
GM
Eljanov, Pavel
2739
1-0
2.2
GM
Nakamura, Hikaru
2789
-
GM
Ponomariov, Ruslan
2709
½-½
2.3
GM
So, Wesley
2782
-
GM
Kryvoruchko, Yuriy
2693
½-½
2.4
GM
Shankland, Samuel L
2679
-
GM
Korobov, Anton
2675
½-½
Bo.
17
Czech Republic (CZE)
Rtg
-
20
Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
2:2
3.1
GM
Navara, David
2742
-
GM
Jobava, Baadur
2665
½-½
3.2
GM
Laznicka, Viktor
2651
-
GM
Mchedlishvili, Mikheil
2609
½-½
3.3
GM
Hracek, Zbynek
2591
-
GM
Pantsulaia, Levan
2601
½-½
3.4
IM
Plat, Vojtech
2519
-
GM
Gelashvili, Tamaz
2575
½-½
Bo.
27
Greece (GRE)
Rtg
-
4
Azerbaijan 1 (AZE)
Rtg
2:2
4.1
GM
Mastrovasilis, Dimitrios
2601
-
GM
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar
2761
½-½
4.2
GM
Banikas, Hristos
2571
-
GM
Radjabov, Teimour
2722
½-½
4.3
GM
Mastrovasilis, Athanasios
2555
-
GM
Naiditsch, Arkadij
2696
1-0
4.4
GM
Halkias, Stelios
2565
-
GM
Safarli, Eltaj
2688
0-1
Bo.
25
Canada (CAN)
Rtg
-
23
Belarus (BLR)
Rtg
2½:1½
5.1
GM
Bareev, Evgeny
2675
-
GM
Zhigalko, Sergei
2652
½-½
5.2
GM
Kovalyov, Anton
2617
-
GM
Kovalev, Vladislav
2599
½-½
5.3
GM
Hansen, Eric
2582
-
GM
Zhigalko, Andrey
2591
1-0
5.4
IM
Krnan, Tomas
2430
-
GM
Aleksandrov, Aleksej
2547
½-½
Bo.
13
Germany (GER)
Rtg
-
1
Russia (RUS)
Rtg
1:3
6.1
GM
Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter
2687
-
GM
Karjakin, Sergey
2769
½-½
6.2
GM
Meier, Georg
2654
-
GM
Kramnik, Vladimir
2808
0-1
6.3
GM
Bluebaum, Matthias
2626
-
GM
Tomashevsky, Evgeny
2731
½-½
6.4
GM
Fridman, Daniel
2618
-
GM
Nepomniachtchi, Ian
2740
0-1
Bo.
3
China (CHN)
Rtg
-
26
Argentina (ARG)
Rtg
2½:1½
7.1
GM
Wang, Yue
2737
-
GM
Mareco, Sandro
2606
0-1
7.2
GM
Ding, Liren
2753
-
GM
Perez Ponsa, Federico
2585
1-0
7.3
GM
Li, Chao b
2746
-
GM
Flores, Diego
2595
1-0
7.4
GM
Wei, Yi
2717
-
GM
Pichot, Alan
2536
½-½
Bo.
30
Romania (ROU)
Rtg
-
28
Azerbaijan 2 (AZE2)
Rtg
2½:1½
8.1
GM
Lupulescu, Constantin
2618
-
GM
Durarbayli, Vasif
2612
1-0
8.2
GM
Parligras, Mircea-Emilian
2595
-
GM
Abasov, Nijat
2552
1-0
8.3
IM
Deac, Bogdan-Daniel
2524
-
GM
Guseinov, Gadir
2625
½-½
8.4
GM
Marin, Mihail
2572
-
GM
Guliyev, Namig
2577
0-1
Bo.
44
Iceland (ISL)
Rtg
-
19
Turkey (TUR)
Rtg
2:2
9.1
GM
Stefansson, Hannes
2574
-
GM
Solak, Dragan
2635
½-½
9.2
GM
Gretarsson, Hjorvar Steinn
2547
-
GM
Ipatov, Alexander
2652
½-½
9.3
GM
Hjartarson, Johann
2545
-
GM
Yilmaz, Mustafa
2616
½-½
9.4
IM
Thorfinnsson, Bragi
2430
-
GM
Can, Emre
2565
½-½
Bo.
37
Kazakhstan (KAZ)
Rtg
-
21
Latvia (LAT)
Rtg
1½:2½
10.1
GM
Jumabayev, Rinat
2604
-
GM
Shirov, Alexei
2673
1-0
10.2
 
Utegaliyev, Azamat
2513
-
GM
Kovalenko, Igor
2651
0-1
10.3
GM
Kazhgaleyev, Murtas
2594
-
GM
Neiksans, Arturs
2628
0-1
10.4
GM
Ismagambetov, Anuar
2542
-
IM
Meskovs, Nikita
2476
½-½
Bo.
47
Chile (CHI)
Rtg
-
6
England (ENG)
Rtg
1:3
11.1
GM
Morovic Fernandez, Ivan
2554
-
GM
Howell, David W L
2665
½-½
11.2
GM
Vasquez Schroeder, Rodrigo
2546
-
GM
McShane, Luke J
2671
0-1
11.3
IM
Henriquez Villagra, Cristobal
2508
-
GM
Jones, Gawain C B
2635
0-1
11.4
FM
Perez Gormaz, Matias
2444
-
GM
Short, Nigel D
2666
½-½
Bo.
12
Norway (NOR)
Rtg
-
53
Philippines (PHI)
Rtg
2:2
12.1
GM
Carlsen, Magnus
2857
-
GM
Sadorra, Julio Catalino
2560
½-½
12.2
GM
Hammer, Jon Ludvig
2651
-
GM
Gomez, John Paul
2492
½-½
12.3
GM
Tari, Aryan
2570
-
GM
Torre, Eugenio
2447
½-½
12.4
GM
Urkedal, Frode
2537
-
GM
Barcenilla, Rogelio
2455
½-½
Bo.
7
Poland (POL)
Rtg
-
39
Paraguay (PAR)
Rtg
2:2
13.1
GM
Wojtaszek, Radoslaw
2736
-
GM
Delgado Ramirez, Neuris
2618
½-½
13.2
GM
Duda, Jan-Krzysztof
2675
-
GM
Bachmann, Axel
2641
½-½
13.3
GM
Piorun, Kacper
2681
-
GM
Cubas, Jose Fernando
2470
0-1
13.4
GM
Swiercz, Dariusz
2639
-
GM
Franco Ocampos, Zenon
2496
1-0
Bo.
22
Bulgaria (BUL)
Rtg
-
29
Slovenia (SLO)
Rtg
½:3½
14.1
GM
Nikolov, Momchil
2585
-
GM
Beliavsky, Alexander G
2602
0-1
14.2
GM
Iotov, Valentin
2518
-
GM
Lenic, Luka
2622
0-1
14.3
GM
Rusev, Krasimir
2548
-
GM
Skoberne, Jure
2562
½-½
14.4
IM
Petrov, Martin
2458
-
GM
Sebenik, Matej
2526
0-1
Bo.
46
Iran (IRI)
Rtg
-
35
Moldova (MDA)
Rtg
2½:1½
15.1
GM
Ghaem Maghami, Ehsan
2566
-
GM
Bologan, Victor
2648
½-½
15.2
 
Maghsoodloo, Parham
2566
-
GM
Iordachescu, Viorel
2584
½-½
15.3
IM
Lorparizangeneh, Shahin
2478
-
GM
Svetushkin, Dmitry
2543
1-0
15.4
 
Firouzja, Alireza
2463
-
IM
Hamitevici, Vladimir
2489
½-½
Bo.
34
Peru (PER)
Rtg
-
24
Serbia (SRB)
Rtg
2½:1½
16.1
GM
Cordova, Emilio
2638
-
GM
Ivanisevic, Ivan
2650
½-½
16.2
GM
Cori, Jorge
2609
-
GM
Markus, Robert
2662
1-0
16.3
IM
Vera Siguenas, Deivy
2499
-
GM
Sedlak, Nikola
2537
1-0
16.4
GM
Cruz, Cristhian
2519
-
GM
Indjic, Aleksandar
2548
0-1
Bo.
42
Denmark (DEN)
Rtg
-
18
Croatia (CRO)
Rtg
1½:2½
17.1
GM
Hansen, Sune Berg
2595
-
GM
Saric, Ivan
2668
½-½
17.2
GM
Andersen, Mads
2535
-
GM
Palac, Mladen
2623
½-½
17.3
GM
Rasmussen, Allan Stig
2522
-
GM
Kozul, Zdenko
2622
0-1
17.4
GM
Schandorff, Lars
2515
-
GM
Brkic, Ante
2584
½-½
Bo.
36
Italy (ITA)
Rtg
-
54
Finland (FIN)
Rtg
3½:½
18.1
GM
Vocaturo, Daniele
2583
-
GM
Nyback, Tomi
2580
1-0
18.2
GM
Dvirnyy, Danyyil
2543
-
IM
Karttunen, Mika
2458
1-0
18.3
GM
Rombaldoni, Axel
2567
-
IM
Ebeling, Daniel
2468
½-½
18.4
FM
Moroni, Luca Jr
2459
-
IM
Sipila, Vilka
2447
1-0
Bo.
60
Portugal (POR)
Rtg
-
14
Spain (ESP)
Rtg
1½:2½
19.1
IM
Ferreira, Jorge Viterbo
2511
-
GM
Salgado Lopez, Ivan
2662
1-0
19.2
GM
Galego, Luis
2458
-
GM
Anton Guijarro, David
2630
0-1
19.3
IM
Damaso, Rui
2444
-
GM
Vazquez Igarza, Renier
2580
0-1
19.4
GM
Fernandes, Antonio
2413
-
GM
Ibarra Jerez, Jose Carlos
2566
½-½

Women's section (top pairings)

Bo.
2
Ukraine (UKR)
Rtg
-
3
Russia (RUS)
Rtg
2:2
1.1
GM
Muzychuk, Anna
2550
-
GM
Kosteniuk, Alexandra
2538
1-0
1.2
GM
Muzychuk, Mariya
2539
-
GM
Gunina, Valentina
2520
½-½
1.3
GM
Zhukova, Natalia
2475
-
WGM
Goryachkina, Aleksandra
2475
½-½
1.4
GM
Ushenina, Anna
2457
-
WGM
Girya, Olga
2452
0-1
Bo.
11
Romania (ROU)
Rtg
-
1
China (CHN)
Rtg
2:2
2.1
IM
Peptan, Corina-Isabela
2394
-
GM
Ju, Wenjun
2583
1-0
2.2
IM
Foisor, Cristina-Adela
2353
-
GM
Zhao, Xue
2522
½-½
2.3
WGM
Cosma, Elena-Luminita
2331
-
WGM
Tan, Zhongyi
2475
½-½
2.4
IM
Bulmaga, Irina
2395
-
IM
Guo, Qi
2417
0-1
Bo.
31
Kazakhstan (KAZ)
Rtg
-
8
Hungary (HUN)
Rtg
2:2
3.1
WGM
Abdumalik, Zhansaya
2389
-
GM
Hoang, Thanh Trang
2467
½-½
3.2
WIM
Dauletova, Gulmira
2275
-
IM
Lazarne Vajda, Szidonia
2372
½-½
3.3
WFM
Zhylkaidarova, Sholpan
2162
-
WGM
Papp, Petra
2336
½-½
3.4
 
Mukhit, Aisezym
2065
-
IM
Gara, Anita
2355
½-½
Bo.
4
Georgia (GEO)
Rtg
-
16
Azerbaijan 1 (AZE)
Rtg
2:2
4.1
GM
Dzagnidze, Nana
2522
-
WGM
Mamedjarova, Zeinab
2295
1-0
4.2
IM
Javakhishvili, Lela
2486
-
WGM
Mammadzada, Gunay
2361
½-½
4.3
IM
Batsiashvili, Nino
2474
-
WGM
Mammadova, Gulnar
2304
0-1
4.4
IM
Melia, Salome
2419
-
WGM
Kazimova, Narmin
2302
½-½
Bo.
7
Poland (POL)
Rtg
-
19
Vietnam (VIE)
Rtg
3:1
5.1
GM
Socko, Monika
2437
-
IM
Pham, Le Thao Nguyen
2338
1-0
5.2
WGM
Zawadzka, Jolanta
2429
-
WGM
Hoang, Thi Bao Tram
2325
0-1
5.3
WGM
Szczepkowska-Horowska, Karina
2409
-
WGM
Nguyen, Thi Mai Hung
2316
1-0
5.4
WGM
Kulon, Klaudia
2346
-
WGM
Nguyen, Thi Thanh An
2249
1-0
Bo.
5
India (IND)
Rtg
-
29
Latvia (LAT)
Rtg
2½:1½
6.1
GM
Harika, Dronavalli
2542
-
WGM
Reizniece-Ozola, Dana
2243
1-0
6.2
IM
Padmini, Rout
2408
-
WGM
Rogule, Laura
2306
½-½
6.3
IM
Tania, Sachdev
2402
-
WGM
Berzina, Ilze
2241
0-1
6.4
WGM
Soumya, Swaminathan
2379
-
WGM
Erneste, Inguna
2178
1-0
Bo.
17
Turkey (TUR)
Rtg
-
6
United States of America (USA)
Rtg
½:3½
7.1
IM
Atalik, Ekaterina
2422
-
GM
Krush, Irina
2444
0-1
7.2
WGM
Yildiz, Betul Cemre
2369
-
IM
Paikidze, Nazi
2366
½-½
7.3
WGM
Ozturk, Kubra
2277
-
IM
Zatonskih, Anna
2449
0-1
7.4
WIM
Isgandarova, Khayala
2188
-
WGM
Nemcova, Katerina
2365
0-1
Bo.
21
Netherlands (NED)
Rtg
-
27
Serbia (SRB)
Rtg
2½:1½
8.1
GM
Peng, Zhaoqin
2368
-
WGM
Chelushkina, Irina
2221
1-0
8.2
WGM
Haast, Anne
2306
-
 
Velikic, Adela
2260
½-½
8.3
IM
Lanchava, Tea
2258
-
WIM
Eric, Jovana
2161
1-0
8.4
 
Keetman, Maaike
2221
-
WIM
Drljevic, Ljilja
2207
0-1
Bo.
36
Belarus (BLR)
Rtg
-
18
Israel (ISR)
Rtg
1½:2½
9.1
IM
Ziaziulkina, Nastassia
2382
-
WIM
Shvayger, Yuliya
2408
½-½
9.2
FM
Stetsko, Lanita
2170
-
WIM
Efroimski, Marsel
2322
0-1
9.3
 
Badelka, Olga
2222
-
WIM
Gutmakher, Olga
2216
½-½
9.4
WFM
Bogdan, Ekaterina
2120
-
 
Lahav, Michal
2054
½-½
Bo.
34
Croatia (CRO)
Rtg
-
10
Germany (GER)
Rtg
1½:2½
10.1
WGM
Golubenko, Valentina
2245
-
IM
Paehtz, Elisabeth
2474
½-½
10.2
WIM
Franciskovic, Borka
2267
-
WGM
Michna, Marta
2383
½-½
10.3
WIM
Saric, Kristina
2201
-
WGM
Lubbe, Melanie
2324
0-1
10.4
WFM
Deur Saric, Zrinka
2185
-
WIM
Fuchs, Judith
2287
½-½
Bo.
59
Bolivia (BOL)
Rtg
-
30
Greece (GRE)
Rtg
0:4
11.1
WFM
Ramirez, Maria Eugenia
2104
-
WIM
Pavlidou, Ekaterini
2140
0-1
11.2
WIM
Monroy G., Nataly A.
2105
-
WFM
Avramidou, Anastasia
2273
0-1
11.3
WIM
Cordero, Daniela
1954
-
WFM
Markantonaki, Haritomeni
2188
0-1
11.4
WIM
Estrada, Lucia
1941
-
WGM
Kouvatsou, Maria
2085
0-1
Bo.
20
Italy (ITA)
Rtg
-
48
Norway (NOR)
Rtg
2½:1½
12.1
FM
Brunello, Marina
2376
-
WIM
Sahl, Sheila Barth
2181
½-½
12.2
WFM
Movileanu, Daniela
2268
-
WGM
Dolzhikova, Olga
2167
0-1
12.3
WFM
Di Benedetto, Desiree
2183
-
WIM
Hagesather, Ellen
2139
1-0
12.4
WFM
Santeramo, Alessia
2001
-
 
Machlik, Edit
2056
1-0
Bo.
57
Mexico (MEX)
Rtg
-
46
Philippines (PHI)
Rtg
1:3
13.1
WIM
Guerrero Rodriguez, Alejandra
2043
-
WIM
Frayna, Janelle Mae
2281
0-1
13.2
WIM
Fuentes Godoy, Lilia Ivonne
2142
-
WIM
Fronda, Jan Jodilyn
2128
0-1
13.3
WFM
Parkhurst Casas, Miriam
1993
-
WIM
Secopito, Catherine
2119
0-1
13.4
WIM
Garcia Morales, Ivette Ale
2006
-
WFM
Mendoza, Shania Mae
1965
1-0
Bo.
38
Slovenia (SLO)
Rtg
-
22
Uzbekistan (UZB)
Rtg
1½:2½
14.1
WIM
Unuk, Laura
2332
-
WGM
Muminova, Nafisa
2324
½-½
14.2
WGM
Krivec, Jana
2259
-
WIM
Tokhirjonova, Gulrukhbegim
2289
0-1
14.3
WFM
Kolaric, Spela
2079
-
WIM
Gevorgyan, Irina
2324
1-0
14.4
WFM
Vidic, Teja
2121
-
WIM
Kurbonboeva, Sarvinoz
2223
0-1
Bo.
52
Turkmenistan (TKM)
Rtg
-
55
Singapore (SIN)
Rtg
3:1
15.1
WGM
Geldiyeva, Mahri
2285
-
IM
Li, Ruofan
2353
½-½
15.2
WFM
Ovezdurdiyeva, Jemal
2031
-
WIM
Gong, Qianyun
2262
½-½
15.3
WFM
Atabayeva, Gozel
2021
-
 
Tin, Ruiqi
1892
1-0
15.4
WFM
Hallaeva, Bahar
2103
-
 
Hng, Mei-En Emmanuelle
1883
1-0
Bo.
56
Estonia (EST)
Rtg
-
13
Iran (IRI)
Rtg
2½:1½
16.1
WIM
Narva, Mai
2238
-
IM
Khademalsharieh, Sarasadat
2429
½-½
16.2
WIM
Tsiganova, Monika
2095
-
WGM
Pourkashiyan, Atousa
2335
½-½
16.3
 
Olde, Margareth
2003
-
WGM
Hejazipour, Mitra
2314
½-½
16.4
WCM
Narva, Triin
2023
-
WIM
Hakimifard, Ghazal
2308
1-0
Bo.
43
Sweden (SWE)
Rtg
-
14
Spain (ESP)
Rtg
2½:1½
17.1
GM
Cramling, Pia
2444
-
WGM
Calzetta Ruiz, Monica
2249
1-0
17.2
WIM
Agrest, Inna
2222
-
IM
Vega Gutierrez, Sabrina
2411
½-½
17.3
 
Bengtsson, Jessica
2005
-
IM
Matnadze, Ana
2383
0-1
17.4
 
Fransson, Angelina
1996
-
WIM
Aranaz Murillo, Amalia
2279
1-0
Bo.
42
Montenegro (MNE)
Rtg
-
15
Mongolia (MGL)
Rtg
1:3
18.1
WIM
Milovic, Aleksandra
2252
-
IM
Nomin-Erdene, Davaademberel
2422
0-1
18.2
WIM
Blagojevic, Tijana
2223
-
IM
Batchimeg, Tuvshintugs
2391
1-0
18.3
WIM
Stojanovic, Marija R
2127
-
WGM
Enkhtuul, Altan-Ulzii
2288
0-1
18.4
WFM
Blagojevic, Lidija
1957
-
WIM
Lkhamsuren, Uuganbayar
2147
0-1
Bo.
12
Lithuania (LTU)
Rtg
-
44
Moldova (MDA)
Rtg
1:3
19.1
GM
Cmilyte, Viktorija
2536
-
WIM
Baciu, Diana
2279
0-1
19.2
IM
Daulyte, Deimante
2421
-
IM
Petrenko, Svetlana
2176
1-0
19.3
WIM
Zaksaite, Salomeja
2298
-
WFM
Hincu, Olga
2125
0-1
19.4
WFM
Domarkaite, Laima
2161
-
WGM
Partac, Elena
2086
0-1

Olympiad schedule

Date Time Event, function
1 September 18:30/20:30 Arrival, Opening, Captains meeting
2 September 10:00/15:00 Arbiters meeting/Round 1
3 September 15:00 Round 2
4 September 15:00 Round 3
5 September 15:00 Round 4
6 September 15:00/22:00 Round 5/Bermuda Party
7 September   Day Off
8 September 15:00 Round 6
9 September 15:00 Round 7
10 September 15:00 Round 8
11 September 15:00 Round 9
12 September 15:00 Round 10
13 September 11:00/19:30 Round 11/Closing Ceremony
14 September All day Departure day

Links

The games are being broadcast live on the official web site and on the server Playchess.com. If you are not a member you can download a free Playchess client there and get immediate access. You can also use ChessBase or any of our Fritz compatible chess programs.
 


Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


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Bertman Bertman 9/10/2016 07:39
@Lavanda

I agree, and it will be included in round seven and beyond. Cheers.
Lavanda Lavanda 9/9/2016 10:15
I'm well aware and clearly remember that ChessBase is the first chess news site of this kind, however I agree with Aighearach that including the standings, let's say top 5 or top 10, after each round would make the report more complete.
scoobeedo scoobeedo 9/9/2016 06:20
This Chess Olympiad is until now the most interesting that I ever followed.

The Level of the so-called weaker chess nations improved a lot and the usual suspects for the medals have to be careful against every opponent.

It makes this chess meeting outstanding!

WHo will win this olympiad? My Tip is the USA. But only because it is a team with calmn players on the boards 1-3 and a incredible talented Youngster on 4.

We remember the chess olympiad when Kramnik was 17 years!.

The US Team is similar to the russian team from this time.

- - -

I wish all teams good luck to get the best results!
Bertman Bertman 9/9/2016 04:44
@fightingchess

If it had been a good game at least, no doubt, but as it is, the event carries over over 270 grandmasters alone so providing interesting and comprehensive coverage is challenging to say the least. I cannot even claim we showed all the best or important games.
Bertman Bertman 9/9/2016 04:40
@Aighearach

New at the news? ChessBase? ChessBase is easily one of the oldest chess news sources on the internet, and I think only TWIC can claim to be older. ChessBase was the first to start using photos and more in reports and in ChessBase Magazine.
Aighearach Aighearach 9/9/2016 04:19
One great addition to think about would be including the standings in the report.

I know you're knew at the "news" side of chess, but it is something to think about! I'm not convinced there is value in half-reporting, but reporting on an event as if you're a professional has real commercial promotion value for your products. Forcing people who want the news from you to also use another site is basically guaranteeing that your promotion reaches a smaller audience than has demand for your promotion; and those users respect the effort less.

Overheard at a chess club: "Well, I think chessbase just assumes you already got the results somewhere else, and that it would be redundant to tell you what happened."
fightingchess fightingchess 9/9/2016 12:48
if the world champion is in trouble with white against a 2500 rated player, i would like to see the annotated game. how many world champions do we have?
Camembert Camembert 9/9/2016 10:42
Wang Yue was winning but on time pressure, Wang Yue blundered.
Catastrophe Catastrophe 9/9/2016 09:27
No mention of the Kramnik game :/
Bertman Bertman 9/9/2016 09:23
@GregEs

Quite right, and fixed. Thanks.
GregEs GregEs 9/9/2016 09:09
The lateral pin trick of Hansen vs Zighalko is instructive. Thanks for including that little tactic.
GregEs GregEs 9/9/2016 08:44
Great report. But I noticed I was confused with the label just above the annotated game of Adhiban. The label just above the game or should I say just below the photo of Baskaran Adhiban, the confusing label is: " B. Adhiban - Erwin L'Ami (annotated by Elshan Moradiabadi) " but the real game is L'Ami-Adhiban where Adhiban is black.
sicilian_D sicilian_D 9/9/2016 08:43
again, good report, thanks.
sicilian_D sicilian_D 9/9/2016 07:25
congratulations India!
jsaldea12 jsaldea12 9/9/2016 01:08
Sideline: HOW ABOUT GATES AND BUFFETS SPONSORING GRAND CHESS TOURNAMENT?

Regarding that punch line: match between Carlsen Vs. Gate? Carlsen is world chess champion while Gate is richest billionaire. If that happen, there would be exchanges: Gate swaps his wealth to Carlsen while Carlsen swaps his chess prowess to Gate. BUT HONESTLY SPEAKING, BILL GATE S AND WARREN BUFFETS CAN EXPAND AREAS OF THEIR FOUNDATION, TO INCLUDE SPORT, LIKE CHESS. How about that Bill Gates and Warren Buffets . Make millions of chess players happy, make Bill and Warren take time and be happy too. (sent to Bill Gates)
jsaldea12 jsaldea12 9/9/2016 12:55
Congratrulation to Caruana, persistent and unwavering fighter, beating Eljanol. Congrats to Sadorra, Philippine, fighting and drawing with Carlsen and to Philippines Team, Women, for beating Mexico 3-1.
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