2016 Baku Rd1: Bulgaria held to draw by Sudan

by Albert Silver
9/2/2016 – The 2016 Baku Olympiad certainly lives up to its name with no fewer than 180 teams ranging from Russia to Djibouti in the Open section, and 140 teams in the Women's section. The opening round saw results that reflected the huge rating disparities, with the occasional heroic result, but the greatest surprise was without a doubt Bulgaria's draw against Sudan, in which two of the Bulgarian fell prey to their Sudanese opponents. Big report with GM commentary.

2016 Baku Olympiad

All games start at 3 p.m. local time = 15 p.m. in Europe (CEST), one hour earlier in Britain, and 2 p.m. in Moscow. You can find the starting time at your location here.

Watch it live on Playchess!

Round one

The numbers are unquestionably impressive: 894 players in the Open section, including a staggering 253 grandmasters, and a similar number of masters, while the Women’s section has 693 players, of which 435 are titled.

 

It all started with a spectacular Opening Ceremony (see footage at 2:00)

The teams are all immensely strong needless to say though the lineups are not without a few surprises and omissions. At the very top of the Open section is the Russian team, which comes as no surprise. Their average rating of 2768 is comprised of Sergey Karjakin on first board, followed by Vladimir Kramnik, Evgeny Tomashevksky, Ian Nepomniachtchi, and finally Alexander Grischuk. Considering just how deep the talent runs in Russia, one could bring up names such as Svidler, Andreikin, and more, but it is just the nature of such a situation. In spite of their favoritism on paper, the Russians have not taken gold since 2002, the last time Kasparov himself played, a reminder of just how tough the competition is.

Russia, with Sergey Karjakin on board one, had no issues with Nigeria (photo by Eteri Kublashvili)

In second, with only three Elo separating them, is the US team with an average rating of 2765 FIDE, and it should be noted that the top three boards outrate any other three, with Top Ten names Fabiano Caruana, Hikaru Nakamura, and Wesley So, followed by Ray Robson and Sam Shankland to bolster the last board.

Sam Shankland (USA) - Joan Fernandez Lopez (Andorra)

White wins a piece here. Can you see how? Hint: be wary of the 'obvious'

In third is China, with a stellar lineup of their own, including Ding Liren, Li Chao, Wang Yue, Yu Yangyi, and of course the Chinese talent Wei Yi. It should be noted that not one of their players is over 30, though the US team can make a similar claim, and if it comes down to youth, Iran’s mostly teenage team probably has the strongest claim.

Anish Giri won his first game, and posted a tongue-in-cheek Tweet

With such a massive tournament, one could easily go on and on, justifiably so, but of note also are the missing members. The most noteworthy is the absence of the entire team of Armenia, which for geopolitical reasons has refused to send a team, a true loss for chess as they won gold no fewer than three out of the last five Olympiads.

Israel is both there and not, and is unlikely to vie for any medals this time, despite having taken silver in 2008 and bronze in 2010 ahead of much higher rated rivals. For reasons that are related to issues between the government, the federation and the top players, none of the top players such as Gelfand or Sutovsky will be playing.

The Azeri team is coached by Alexey Dreev and Etienne Bacrot

Many teams sought out coaching help from foreign players. Above, Ivory Coast brought in GM Maurice Ashley to help, but other examples include Bulgarian GM Georgiev who is the captain of Egypt's team, Polish GM Krasenkov who is captain of Turkey, and GM Ivan Sokolov who is helping Iran.

Team Jamaica (photo by Eteri Kublashvili)

The Women’s section also has their outright favorites and here we already have the first surprise. The Chinese team is the clear top seed with an average 2560 rating, with Hou Yifan on first board, followed by Ju Wenjun, Zhao Xue, Tan Zhongyi and Gui Qi. They outrate their nearest rivals by 55 Elo, the second seed…. Ukraine! It has been such a consistent story of numbers for the last years: China and Russia fighting over the top honors that it was easy to not realize that a change had taken place, even if by a single Elo point, and this year Ukraine is the second seed with a 2505 average, led by Anna Muzychuk, Mariya Muzychuk, Natalia Zhukova, Anna Ushenina (all GMs) and Inna Gaponenko.

Hou Yifan missed out on the first round, but nor was she needed (photo by Rasim Huseynov)

The Russian Women's team have taken gold ahead of China in the last three Olympiads 

 

Aleksandra Goryachkina is playing on Russia's second board (photo by Eteri Kublashvili)

The opening day saw a number of fascinating results and mishaps, some at the board and some off. For the most part, aside from the occasional draws here or there, the favorites won by massive scores. In the Open section, the top ten matches saw the favorites drop only a single draw out of 40 games. Mind oyu, though favorites, there were chances of more upsets, such as Wesley So, who found himself facing a full grandmaster right off the bat, but he held his cool and won cleanly.

Round one highlights by GM Daniel King

 

Yusuf Ndoe proudly representing Team Tanzania! (photo by David Llada)

Match preparation taken to the next level. Notice the elaborate nail polish. (photo by David Llada)

Diana Real Pereyra from Mexico stares down her opponent (photo by David Llada)

There were some surprises though, at least for those watching the games. Spectators watching online were shocked to see England being wiped out by the IBCA, the team of blind players. No disrespect meant to the IBCA players, all of whom are full-fledged masters in their own right, but a surprise whitewash against England seemed incredible.

A similar tale was told of Iran, who were facing a massacre by the team from Botswana, losing on all boards. Thankfully, it turned out to be merely a technical glitch that had inverted the names in the transmissions, and the corrected scores brought sighs of relief to many.

Then there was the astonishing result by Bulgaria. Facing a quite modest team by Sudan, and enjoying a majestic Topalov on board one, they showed an incredible 2-2 result at the end. Was this yet another case of equipment malfunction? No, indeed. Was this perhaps a highly unfortunate result of catastrophic blunders by two of the Bulgarian players? This would seem the most likely explanation, but the truth was even more startling: the two Sudanese players had quite simply outplayed their much higher rated opponents as if their Elos had been inverted. See for yourself.

Mohamed Abdalla Abdelazeez - Martin Petrov (annotated by GM Elshan Moradiabadi)

[Event "42nd Olympiad Baku 2016 Open"] [Site "Baku"] [Date "2016.09.02"] [Round "1.8"] [White "Abdelazeez Mohamed Abdalla"] [Black "Petrov, Martin"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E15"] [WhiteElo "2183"] [BlackElo "2458"] [Annotator "Elshan Moradiabadi"] [PlyCount "99"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventCountry "AZE"] [WhiteTeam "Sudan"] [BlackTeam "Bulgarien"] [WhiteTeamCountry "SUD"] [BlackTeamCountry "BUL"] [TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"] [WhiteClock "0:34:02"] [BlackClock "0:22:54"] {This could easily be a master vs. amateur game. It is indeed one, however, in this game the weaker player, Elo-wise, demonstrates great understanding and beats a strong International Master.} 1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {0} e6 {1} 3. Nf3 {0} b6 {51 Petrov decides to play it classical: A Queen's Indian ladies and gentlemen!} 4. g3 {12} Bb4+ {345 After a long thought. Presumably, Petrov wanted to win this game and then he decided to choose something less common than the main line.} 5. Nbd2 $1 {65 A great choice by Abdelazeez! The exclamation mark is not because of this move's strength but it is for its psychological value! White will have a very solid position and although this is not an ambitious continuation for White, it definitely keeps White's position solid and avoids complications!} (5. Bd2 c5 {is what probably Petrov was hoping for.}) 5... Ba6 {(376) Again, after a long time for an opening move. Petrov is obviously not happy with his choice of opening and he seeks some complications in which he may outplay his lower-rated opponent. But this move does not offer many complications, so he should have tried the following continuation if he wanted a very complicated game:} (5... Bb7 6. Bg2 c5 7. d5 $1 exd5 8. Nh4 O-O 9. O-O Re8 {[#] Well, this is not a nice position for Black with that aimless bishop on b4 but the position is really complex and both parties can go astray.} 10. Nb1 (10. Nf5 d6 11. a3 Bxd2 12. Qxd2 Ne4 13. Qf4 Re5 14. cxd5 Bxd5 15. Rd1 Nc6 16. Rxd5 Rxd5 17. Bxe4 Rd1+ 18. Kg2 Nd4 19. Qg4 g6 20. Bg5 gxf5 21. Bxf5 h5 22. Qxh5 Nxf5 23. Bxd8 { 1-0 (23) Bach,M (2337)-Reeh,O (2420) Hamburg 1999}) 10... d6 11. a3 Ba5 12. cxd5 b5 13. Nf5 Bc8 14. Ne3 Nbd7 15. Nc2 Ne5 16. b4 Bb6 17. Nc3 Bd7 18. Bg5 h6 19. Bxf6 Qxf6 20. bxc5 Bxc5 21. Ne4 Qg6 22. Nxc5 dxc5 23. e4 Nc4 24. Qd3 f6 { 0-1 (24) Moiseenko,A (2692)-Riazantsev,A (2684) Wroclaw 2014}) 6. Qc2 {11} Bb7 {41} 7. Bg2 {16} Be4 {71} 8. Qb3 {10} Nc6 $6 {138 Is Petrov after some tricks?} (8... Bxd2+ 9. Bxd2 O-O 10. O-O d6 11. Qe3 a5 12. b3 Nbd7 {Preserves equality for Black. Nevertheless, White has a risk-free solid position which he can try to imprve and even push for an advantage.} 13. Bc3 Re8 14. Bh3 Bb7 15. Rfd1 Qe7 16. Bb2 h6 17. Rac1 Qf8 18. Ne1 Rac8 19. Qd3 Qe7 20. Nc2 Ra8 21. Na3 Rec8 22. Nb5 a4 23. d5 axb3 24. axb3 e5 25. Ra1 Ba6 26. Nc3 Qd8 27. Ra2 Bb7 28. Rda1 Rxa2 29. Rxa2 Ra8 30. Qb1 c6 31. Bg2 cxd5 32. cxd5 b5 33. b4 Nb6 34. Rxa8 Qxa8 35. e4 Nc4 36. Bc1 Ba6 37. Bf1 Qc8 38. Qa2 Kh7 39. Kg2 Nd7 40. Bxc4 bxc4 41. Qa3 Bb7 42. Qa7 f5 43. Nb5 fxe4 44. Nxd6 Qf8 45. Qxb7 Qf3+ 46. Kg1 Nf6 47. Be3 Qd1+ {1/2-1/2 (47) Yilmaz,M (2570)-Sjugirov,S (2669) Moscow 2015}) 9. O-O {361} Bxd2 {142} 10. Bxd2 {18} O-O {82} (10... Bxf3 {does not work due to} 11. Qxf3 { A rare case of a pin over the long diagonal by the queen!}) 11. Qe3 $6 {418 Abdelazeez still follows the plan with d6 and Nbd7 but the queen on e3 here does not do much for White. Nevertheless, we cannot blame him because he is following exactly the same plan demonstrated by the expert of this opening, GM Pavel Tregubov} (11. Rfd1 h6 12. Qe3 $6 {Strangely, Tregubov made this one inaccurate move too.} (12. Bc3 $1 $14) 12... a6 (12... d5) 13. Bc3 Re8 14. Bh3 b5 15. b3 bxc4 16. bxc4 Rb8 17. Ne5 d6 18. f3 dxe5 19. dxe5 Nd5 20. cxd5 Bxd5 21. f4 Ne7 22. g4 Qc8 23. f5 Ba8 24. f6 Ng6 25. fxg7 Qb7 26. Kf2 Rbd8 27. Qxh6 Qb6+ 28. Qe3 Qxe3+ 29. Kxe3 Kxg7 30. Bf1 Rd5 31. Rxd5 Bxd5 32. Kf2 Bc4 33. e3 Bxf1 34. Rxf1 Rd8 35. Rc1 Rd5 36. Bd4 Ra5 37. Rxc7 Rxa2+ 38. Kg3 Ra5 39. h4 Kg8 40. h5 Nxe5 41. g5 Rb5 42. g6 fxg6 43. h6 Nf7 44. h7+ Kxh7 45. Rxf7+ Kh6 46. Re7 {1-0 (46) Tregubov,P (2628)-Romanishin,O (2559) Ohrid 2001}) 11... d5 {1034 } 12. b3 {1364} Rc8 {576} 13. Bc3 {246} Ne7 {151} 14. Rfd1 {519} Nf5 {212} 15. Qc1 {41 Petrov has managed to regroup his pieces but White still has the pair of bishops and more space.} Qd6 {270} 16. Bh3 $1 {209 A typically good move in this position. Now White wants to move his knight either to d2 or g5 to capture the bishop on e4.} Bxf3 {413} 17. exf3 {11 Petrov decideds to defend with two knights vs.two bishops.} Qc6 {314} 18. c5 $1 {542 Brilliant positional play by Abdelazeez! Great timing, the pawn on c5 cannot be taken because White first will capture f5 and then c5.} Rfe8 {399} (18... bxc5 $2 19. Bxf5 exf5 20. dxc5 Qxc5 $2 21. Bxf6 Qxc1 22. Raxc1 gxf6 23. Rxd5 {And Black is dead lost in this endgame.}) 19. b4 {71 Abdelazeez reminds us of Capablanca and Karpov! He gradually grinds his advantage through! Petrov is in trouble!} Rcd8 $2 {112 Probably shocked at how a player who is almost 300 Elo below him had outplayed him in 20 moves. Petrov starts to stall and hope for a mistake by his opponent. However, in my opinion this was a bad practical decision. Once a player is capable of demonstrating such a great positional skill, procrastination would only give him more time to increase his advantage, Petrov should have played bxc5 to complicate matters.} (19... bxc5 20. bxc5 (20. dxc5 d4 {could have happened, which would have considerably mitigated White's advantage.}) 20... Nd7) 20. a4 {144} bxc5 {35} 21. Bxf5 {374} (21. b5 { was better and decisive.} Qb6 22. dxc5 Qxc5 23. Bxf6 Qxc1 24. Raxc1 gxf6 25. Bxf5 exf5 26. Rxc7 {with a winning rook endgame.}) 21... exf5 {437 Petrov misses his chance but he really had to take the queenless endgame and should have tried to defend it.} (21... cxb4 22. Bxb4 Qxc1 23. Rdxc1 exf5 24. Rxc7 Rd7 25. Rac1 g6 26. Rxd7 Nxd7 27. Rc7 Nf8 28. Bc5 Ne6 29. Rxa7 Nxc5 30. dxc5 Re1+ 31. Kg2 Rc1 {with some drawing chances.}) 22. dxc5 {333} a5 $4 {384 It is a bad day at the office for Petrov. He blunders and forces himself into a lost endgame.} (22... d4 23. Bxd4 Qxf3) 23. b5 $1 {57} Qxc5 {57} 24. Bxf6 {10} Qxc1 {11} 25. Raxc1 {12} gxf6 {5} 26. Rxc7 {14} d4 {42} 27. Rd3 {14} (27. Kf1 { was much better which prevents Black's rook to enter the second rank.}) 27... Rd6 { 379} 28. Kg2 {90} (28. Kf1) 28... Kg7 {43} 29. Ra7 $6 {148} (29. f4 {was better and less challenging!}) 29... Re2 {10} 30. Rxa5 {358} Ra2 {10} 31. f4 $2 {322 Now it is already difficult for Abdelazeez to win.} Re6 $1 {80 Finally Petrov gets some active play in this game and he does not miss it!} 32. h3 $2 { 271 This is a weird move! White's advantage is all gone now.} Ree2 {23} 33. Rf3 {44} d3 {92} 34. b6 {80} Reb2 $4 {49 And Petrov lets the draw slip out of his hand! } (34... d2 35. Rd5 Rxa4 36. b7 Rb4 37. Rfd3 Rxb7 38. Rxd2 Rxd2 39. Rxd2 h5 40. h4 Kg6 $11) 35. Rb5 $1 {55} Rxb5 {25} 36. axb5 {16} d2 {20} 37. Rd3 {14} Rb2 {6 } 38. Rd5 $3 {91 A cold shower for Petrov! He had probably counted on Rxb5 but:} d1=Q {67} (38... Rxb5 39. Rxb5 d1=Q 40. b7 {Black has no check and White will assuredly promote!}) 39. Rxd1 {11} Rxb5 {5} 40. Rd6 {0 The rest is a matter of technique and considering the level of play Abdelazeez demonstrated, we can be sure that he had no difficulty winning this one. At least today!} Rb3 {0} 41. Kf1 { 37} Rb2 {17} 42. Ke1 {53} Kg6 {258} 43. Kd1 {41} Rxf2 {397} 44. Rd2 {11} Rf1+ { 21} 45. Kc2 {26} Re1 {6} 46. b7 {68} Re8 {6} 47. Rd7 {7} h5 {49} 48. h4 {5} Kg7 {24} 49. Rc7 {8} Rb8 {10} 50. Kd3 {And Abdelazeez and Sudan did it! 2-2 against Bulgaria with mighty Veslin Topalov in their lineup!} 1-0

If the Open section showed a strong tendency to favor the favorites, the Women’s section was far more so. The first favorite to concede even a draw was 15th seed Mongolia, and the only ‘scare’ in the top matchups was Greece’s narrow 2.5-1.5 victory over Sri Lanka on table 30. The favorites showed why they were favorites, and 400-500 Elo differences were not easily overcome. Observe the handiwork of Ukrainian IM Inna Gaponenko:

Inna Gaponenko (Ukraine) - Ana Ines Da Silva (Portugal)

White wins with a stylish finish

The opening round also saw the visit of the Azerbaijani president Ilham Aliyev visit the venue to make the symbolic first move. Naturally he did so on the first board of the Azeri team, where Shakhriyar Mamedyarov sat. This led to unexpected issues as the security then locked the venue from entrants, which included members of the press.

 

Accompanying this all, there was a high quality video crew filming it with live images of boards, players and more. There was also live commentary in English by GM Evgenij Miroshnichenko, GM Miguel Illescas, GM Susan Polgar and Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam.

Click here to see the live video

Solutions

About GM Elshan Moradiabadi

Elshan Moradiabadi is a GM born and raised in Tehran, Iran. He moved to the US in 2012. Ever since, he has been active in US college chess scenes and in US chess.

Elshan co-authored "Chess and the Art of War: Ancient Wisdom to Make You a Better Player" with Al Lawrence. He has also published written articles for ChessBase, and edited opening materials for fellow authors.

Elshan Moradiabadi is a veteran instructor and teaches chess to every level, with students ranging from beginners to IM. He can be contacted for projects or teaching at his email.

You can contact him at his email or follow him on Twitter.

Round one games (with times per move)

Select games from the list below the board

Open section (top pairings)

Br. 87 Nigeria (NGR) Elo - 1 Russia (RUS) Elo
0:4
1.1 FM Kigigha, Bomo 2340 - GM Karjakin, Sergey 2769
0-1
1.2 FM Anwuli Daniel, 2336 - GM Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2731
0-1
1.3 IM Adu, Oladapo 2334 - GM Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2740
0-1
1.4   Emuakpeje, Ochuko 2272 - GM Grischuk, Alexander 2754
--+
Br. 2 USA Elo - 88 Andorra (AND) Elo
4:0
2.1 GM Nakamura, Hikaru 2789 - IM Aloma Vidal, Robert 2482
1-0
2.2 GM So, Wesley 2782 - GM De La Riva Aguado, Oscar 2503
1-0
2.3 GM Shankland, Samuel L 2679 -   Fernandez Lopez, Joan 2142
1-0
2.4 GM Robson, Ray 2674 - FM Garcia Paolicchi, Raul 2153
1-0
Br. 89 Kosovo (KOS) Elo - 3 China (CHN) Elo
0:4
3.1 FM Saraci, Nderim 2337 - GM Ding, Liren 2753
0-1
3.2   Makolli, Perparim 2289 - GM Yu, Yangyi 2725
0-1
3.3 FM Fejzullahu, Afrim 2298 - GM Li, Chao b 2746
0-1
3.4 IM Sadiku, Bedri 2189 - GM Wei, Yi 2717
0-1
Br. 4 Azerbaijan 1 (AZE) Elo - 92 Zimbabwe (ZIM) Elo
4:0
4.1 GM Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2761 - IM Makoto, Rodwell 2405
1-0
4.2 GM Radjabov, Teimour 2722 - IM Mandizha, Farai 2363
1-0
4.3 GM Naiditsch, Arkadij 2696 -   Masango, Spencer 2200
1-0
4.4 GM Safarli, Eltaj 2688 -   Mushore, Emarald Takudzwa 2187
1-0
Br. 5 Ukraine (UKR) Elo - 91 Jordan (JOR) Elo
4:0
5.1 GM Ponomariov, Ruslan 2709 -   Aboudi, Marwan 2209
1-0
5.2 GM Kryvoruchko, Yuriy 2693 - FM Mansour, Sameer 2245
1-0
5.3 GM Korobov, Anton 2675 - IM Ahmad, Al Khatib 2253
1-0
5.4 GM Volokitin, Andrei 2647 - FM Mohannad, Farhan 2294
1-0
Br. 93 Iraq (IRQ) Elo - 7 Poland (POL) Elo
0:4
6.1 CM Ismael, Namir Mohammed Ismael 2161 - GM Wojtaszek, Radoslaw 2736
0-1
6.2 FM Mohammed, Zozek Salah Mohammed 2251 - GM Duda, Jan-Krzysztof 2675
0-1
6.3 FM Salih, Akar Ali Salih 2302 - GM Bartel, Mateusz 2646
0-1
6.4 FM Abdulwahhab, Ahmed Abdulsattar A 2236 - GM Swiercz, Dariusz 2639
0-1
Br. 8 France (FRA) Elo - 94 Guatemala (GUA) Elo
4:0
7.1 GM Maze, Sebastien 2617 - FM Cu Hor, Winston Darwin 2318
1-0
7.2 GM Edouard, Romain 2635 - IM Juarez Flores, Carlos A. 2392
1-0
7.3 GM Fressinet, Laurent 2664 - IM Lorenzana, Wilson Estuardo 2239
1-0
7.4 GM Bauer, Christian 2623 -   Giron, David 2174
1-0
Br. 95 Bolivia (BOL) Elo - 9 India (IND) Elo
0:4
8.1 IM Gemy, Jose Daniel 2384 - GM Adhiban, B. 2671
0-1
8.2 CM Aguilar, Luis Miguel 2301 - GM Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi 2669
0-1
8.3   Delgadillo, Adonay 2232 - GM Sethuraman, S.P. 2640
0-1
8.4   Parraga, Alejandro 2173 - GM Karthikeyan, Murali 2527
0-1
Br. 10 Hungary (HUN) Elo - 97 Japan (JPN) Elo
3½: ½
9.1 GM Berkes, Ferenc 2640 - IM Kojima, Shinya 2398
1-0
9.2 GM Almasi, Zoltan 2684 - IM Nanjo, Ryosuke 2340
½-½
9.3 GM Balogh, Csaba 2614 -   Averbukh, Alex 2223
1-0
9.4 IM Gledura, Benjamin 2585 - CM Yamada, Kohei 2100
1-0
Br. 98 Morocco (MAR) Elo - 11 Netherlands (NED) Elo
0:4
10.1 IM Tissir, Mohamed 2388 - GM Giri, Anish 2755
0-1
10.2 CM Choukri, Adel 2269 - GM L'Ami, Erwin 2611
0-1
10.3 CM Aithmidou, Mohamed-Mehdi 2229 - GM Van Kampen, Robin 2640
0-1
10.4   Becham, Khalid 2134 - GM Bok, Benjamin 2592
0-1
Br. 12 Norway (NOR) Elo - 99 Wales (WLS) Elo
3:1
11.1 GM Hammer, Jon Ludvig 2651 - IM Jones, Richard S. 2396
½-½
11.2 GM Tari, Aryan 2570 - FM Strugnell, Carl 2239
1-0
11.3 GM Urkedal, Frode 2537 -   Kett, Tim 2227
1-0
11.4 IM Getz, Nicolai 2445 -   Morris, Charles F 2127
½-½
Br. 100 Thailand (THA) Elo - 13 Germany (GER) Elo
½ :3½
12.1 FM Kongsee, Uaychai 2285 - GM Meier, Georg 2654
½-½
12.2 FM Teerapabpaisit, Wisuwat 2248 - GM Bluebaum, Matthias 2626
0-1
12.3 FM Pitirotjirathon, Jirapak 2205 - GM Buhmann, Rainer 2640
0-1
12.4   Sajjapornthep, Jarunpol 1909 - GM Fridman, Daniel 2618
0-1
Br. 14 Spain (ESP) Elo - 101 Syria (SYR) Elo
3½: ½
13.1 GM Vallejo Pons, Francisco 2716 -   Rayes, Abdul Kader 2254
1-0
13.2 GM Salgado Lopez, Ivan 2662 - IM Husari, Satea 2299
½-½
13.3 GM Anton Guijarro, David 2630 -   Bello, Gassan 2096
+--
13.4 GM Ibarra Jerez, Jose Carlos 2566 -   Sohib, Okla 2153
1-0
Br. 102 Nicaragua (NCA) Elo - 15 Cuba (CUB) Elo
½ :3½
14.1 FM Ampie, Mauro 2348 - GM Bruzon Batista, Lazaro 2623
0-1
14.2 FM Pineda, Juan Jose 2175 - GM Quesada Perez, Yuniesky 2636
0-1
14.3   Ortiz, Marcos 2219 - GM Ortiz Suarez, Isan Reynaldo 2581
0-1
14.4 FM Alfaro, William 2188 - GM Gonzalez Vidal, Yuri 2553
½-½
Br. 16 Israel (ISR) Elo - 103 Barbados (BAR) Elo
4:0
15.1 GM Postny, Evgeny 2619 - FM Husbands, Orlando 2257
1-0
15.2 GM Nabaty, Tamir 2630 - FM Del Castilho, Martyn 2248
1-0
15.3 GM Roiz, Michael 2605 - FM Poon, Yu Tien 2196
1-0
15.4 GM Baron, Tal 2553 - IM Farley, Terry 2203
1-0
Br. 104 Malaysia (MAS) Elo - 17 Czech Republic (CZE) Elo
½ :3½
16.1 IM Mok, Tze-Meng 2373 - GM Navara, David 2742
0-1
16.2   Ng, Tze Han 2190 - GM Hracek, Zbynek 2591
0-1
16.3   Subramaniam, Sumant 2137 - GM Babula, Vlastimil 2540
½-½
16.4 IM Liew, Chee-Meng Jimmy 2202 - IM Plat, Vojtech 2519
0-1
Br. 18 Croatia (CRO) Elo - 105 Lebanon (LIB) Elo
3½: ½
17.1 GM Palac, Mladen 2623 - IM Eid, Fadi 2354
1-0
17.2 GM Stevic, Hrvoje 2608 - FM El Jawich, Amro 2260
½-½
17.3 GM Kozul, Zdenko 2622 - FM Kassis, Antoine 2142
1-0
17.4 GM Brkic, Ante 2584 -   Asmar, Elie 2026
1-0
Br. 106 El Salvador (ESA) Elo - 19 Turkey (TUR) Elo
0:4
18.1 IM Arias, Lemnys A. 2305 - GM Ipatov, Alexander 2652
0-1
18.2 FM Arias, Daniel 2285 - GM Yilmaz, Mustafa 2616
0-1
18.3 CM Giron, Jorge Ernesto 2208 - GM Can, Emre 2565
0-1
18.4   Chavez, Hector Eduardo 2077 - GM Esen, Baris 2524
0-1
Br. 20 Georgia (GEO) Elo - 107 Myanmar (MYA) Elo
3½: ½
19.1 GM Mchedlishvili, Mikheil 2609 - IM Wynn, Zaw Htun 2407
½-½
19.2 GM Pantsulaia, Levan 2601 -   Myint, Han 2289
1-0
19.3 GM Gelashvili, Tamaz 2575 -   Sie, Thu 2148
1-0
19.4 GM Sanikidze, Tornike 2497 - WGM Maung Kyaw, Zaw Hein 2031
1-0

Women's section

Br. 1 China (CHN) Elo - 67 Luxembourg (LUX) Elo
4:0
1.1 GM Ju, Wenjun 2583 - WIM Steil-Antoni, Fiona 2159
1-0
1.2 GM Zhao, Xue 2522 - WFM Bakalarz, Grazyna 1953
1-0
1.3 WGM Tan, Zhongyi 2475 -   Biryukov, Alice 1898
1-0
1.4 IM Guo, Qi 2417 -   Kremer, Nadine 1844
1-0
Br. 68 Portugal (POR) Elo - 2 Ukraine (UKR) Elo
0:4
2.1 WFM Baptista, Ana Filipa 2125 - GM Muzychuk, Mariya 2539
0-1
2.2 WFM Coimbra, Margarida 2078 - GM Zhukova, Natalia 2475
0-1
2.3   Silva, Mariana Sofia T. 1789 - GM Ushenina, Anna 2457
0-1
2.4   Silva, Ana Ines Teixeira Da 1855 - IM Gaponenko, Inna 2416
0-1
Br. 3 Russia (RUS) Elo - 69 Scotland (SCO) Elo
4:0
3.1 GM Kosteniuk, Alexandra 2538 - GM Arakhamia-Grant, Ketevan 2381
1-0
3.2 WGM Goryachkina, Aleksandra 2475 -   Roy, Ali 1894
1-0
3.3 WGM Pogonina, Natalija 2484 - WFM Durno, Joy 1894
1-0
3.4 WGM Girya, Olga 2452 -   Espinosa Cancino, Monica 1679
1-0
Br. 83 Nicaragua (NCA) Elo - 16 Azerbaijan 1 (AZE) Elo
0:4
4.1 WFM Mendieta, Kathya 1943 - WGM Mamedjarova, Zeinab 2295
0-1
4.2 WIM Granados Diaz, Maria Esther 1831 - WGM Mammadova, Gulnar 2304
0-1
4.3   Alarcon, Pamela 1834 - WFM Hojjatova, Aydan 2339
0-1
4.4   Moraga, Maria 1732 - WGM Kazimova, Narmin 2302
0-1
Br. 70 ICCD (ICCD) Elo - 4 Georgia (GEO) Elo
0:4
5.1 WIM Baklanova, Tatiana 2200 - IM Javakhishvili, Lela 2486
0-1
5.2   Lagutina, Olga 1910 - GM Khotenashvili, Bela 2463
0-1
5.3   Myronenko, Natalya 1922 - IM Batsiashvili, Nino 2474
0-1
5.4   Gonchar, Svitlana 1807 - IM Melia, Salome 2419
0-1
Br. 5 India (IND) Elo - 71 FYROM (MKD) Elo
4:0
6.1 IM Padmini, Rout 2408 - WFM Stojkovska, Monika 2033
1-0
6.2 IM Tania, Sachdev 2402 -   Bejatovic, Bojana 2063
1-0
6.3 WGM Soumya, Swaminathan 2379 -   Nikolovska, Dragana 1886
1-0
6.4 WIM Pratyusha, Bodda 2287 -   Lakinska, Simona 1695
1-0
Br. 72 Tajikistan (TJK) Elo - 6 United States of America (USA) Elo
0:4
7.1 WFM Antonova, Nadezhda 2015 - GM Krush, Irina 2444
0-1
7.2   Nasriddinzoda, Marvorii 2073 - IM Paikidze, Nazi 2366
0-1
7.3   Hotami, Mutriba 1735 - IM Zatonskih, Anna 2449
0-1
7.4   Odinaeva, Saodat 1881 - WGM Nemcova, Katerina 2365
0-1
Br. 7 Poland (POL) Elo - 73 Kyrgyzstan (KGZ) Elo
4:0
8.1 WGM Zawadzka, Jolanta 2429 -   Samaganova, Alexandra 2048
1-0
8.2 WGM Szczepkowska-Horowska, Karina 2409 -   Omurbekova, Diana 1868
1-0
8.3 WGM Kulon, Klaudia 2346 -   Alymbay Kyzy, Aizhan 1913
1-0
8.4 WIM Wozniak, Mariola 2246 -   Zairbek kyzy, Begimay 1836
1-0
Br. 74 Albania (ALB) Elo - 8 Hungary (HUN) Elo
0:4
9.1 WCM Gjergji, Rozana 1947 - IM Lazarne Vajda, Szidonia 2372
0-1
9.2 WCM Shabanaj, Eglantina 1932 - WGM Papp, Petra 2336
0-1
9.3 WFM Shabanaj, Alda 1881 - WGM Gara, Ticia 2379
0-1
9.4 WCM Tuzi, Bruna 1807 - IM Gara, Anita 2355
0-1
Br. 9 Bulgaria (BUL) Elo - 75 Jamaica (JAM) Elo
4:0
10.1 IM Videnova, Iva 2386 - WIM Richards, Deborah 2023
1-0
10.2 WGM Nikolova, Adriana 2358 - CM Miller, Rachel 1971
1-0
10.3 WIM Raeva, Elitsa 2232 - WCM Barrett, Ariel 1763
1-0
10.4 WGM Voiska, Margarita 2290 - WCM Smith, Annesha 1770
1-0
Br. 11 Romania (ROU) Elo - 77 Dominican Republic (DOM) Elo
4:0
11.1 IM Foisor, Cristina-Adela 2353 - WFM Diaz Cesar, Wilsaida Pieranlly 1889
1-0
11.2 WGM Cosma, Elena-Luminita 2331 - WCM Munoz Santana, Doribel 1899
1-0
11.3 IM Bulmaga, Irina 2395 - WCM Jose Polanco, Kenia 1923
1-0
11.4 WIM Dragomirescu, Angela 2227 -   Almanzar Vasquez, Jennifer Maria 1768
1-0
Br. 78 Puerto Rico (PUR) Elo - 12 Lithuania (LTU) Elo
0:4
12.1 WIM Morales Santos, Natasha 1908 - IM Daulyte, Deimante 2421
0-1
12.2 WFM Comas Colon, Rinelly M. 1773 - WIM Zaksaite, Salomeja 2298
0-1
12.3 WCM Vega Jimenez, Keyshla M. 1641 - WFM Batyte, Daiva 2189
0-1
12.4   Hernandez Resto, Aracelys 1314 - WFM Domarkaite, Laima 2161
0-1
Br. 13 Iran (IRI) Elo - 80 Guatemala (GUA) Elo
4:0
13.1 WGM Pourkashiyan, Atousa 2335 - WCM Figueroa, Julissa 1787
1-0
13.2 WGM Hejazipour, Mitra 2314 - WIM Sotomayor Villatoro, Silvi 1876
1-0
13.3 WIM Hakimifard, Ghazal 2308 - WIM Mazariegos, Silvia Carolina 1942
1-0
13.4   Alavi, Homa 1997 -   Diaz, Luisa 1825
1-0
Br. 81 Ireland (IRL) Elo - 14 Spain (ESP) Elo
0:4
14.1 WCM Mirza, Diana 1948 - WGM Calzetta Ruiz, Monica 2249
0-1
14.2   O`Gorman, Alice 1781 - IM Vega Gutierrez, Sabrina 2411
0-1
14.3 WFM Menon Jayadev, Poornima 1837 - IM Matnadze, Ana 2383
0-1
14.4 WFM Kruk, Karina 1766 - WIM Aranaz Murillo, Amalia 2279
0-1
Br. 15 Mongolia (MGL) Elo - 82 Finland (FIN) Elo
3½: ½
15.1 IM Batchimeg, Tuvshintugs 2391 - WCM Nazarova, Anastasia 1897
1-0
15.2 WIM Uuriintuya, Uurtsaikh 2228 - WFM Puuska, Heini 1926
½-½
15.3 WGM Enkhtuul, Altan-Ulzii 2288 -   Rinne, Heini 1751
1-0
15.4 WIM Lkhamsuren, Uuganbayar 2147 -   Turunen, Tiina 1773
1-0
Br. 17 Turkey (TUR) Elo - 84 Wales (WLS) Elo
4:0
16.1 IM Atalik, Ekaterina 2422 - WFM Smith, Olivia 2002
1-0
16.2 WGM Yildiz, Betul Cemre 2369 - WCM Roberts, Lynda 1888
1-0
16.3 WGM Ozturk, Kubra 2277 -   Camp, Imogen A L 1718
1-0
16.4 WIM Isgandarova, Khayala 2188 -   Sivarajasingam, Venetia 1631
1-0
Br. 86 Panama (PAN) Elo - 18 Israel (ISR) Elo
0:4
17.1   Arosemena, Dalia 0 - WIM Shvayger, Yuliya 2408
0-1
17.2 WCM Munoz, Alba 1704 - IM Klinova, Masha 2290
0-1
17.3 WCM Barria Baker, Raisa Melissa 1961 - WIM Gutmakher, Olga 2216
0-1
17.4 WCM Gonzalez, Yaribeth 1826 -   Lahav, Michal 2054
0-1
Br. 19 Vietnam (VIE) Elo - 85 Morocco (MAR) Elo
4:0
18.1 IM Pham, Le Thao Nguyen 2338 - WCM Bahji, Hind 1948
1-0
18.2 WGM Hoang, Thi Bao Tram 2325 - WIM Rania, Sbai 1907
1-0
18.3 WGM Nguyen, Thi Mai Hung 2316 -   Mayar ElIdrissi, Firdaous 1786
1-0
18.4 WGM Nguyen, Thi Thanh An 2249 - WFM Alaoui Belghiti, Chaimaa 1654
1-0
Br. 87 Iraq (IRQ) Elo - 20 Italy (ITA) Elo
0:4
19.1 WIM Al-Rufaye, Iman Hasan Mohammed 2001 - IM Zimina, Olga 2389
0-1
19.2 WFM Jalaluldeen, Kareen Kamal J. 1824 - FM Brunello, Marina 2376
0-1
19.3 WFM A-ALI, Sali Abbas Abdulzahra 1728 - WFM Movileanu, Daniela 2268
0-1
19.4   Al-Fayyadh, Zainab Asif Abdulah 1703 - WFM Di Benedetto, Desiree 2183
0-1

Olympiad schedule

Date Time Event, function
1 September 18:30/20:30 Arrival, Opening, Captains meeting
2 September 10:00/15:00 Arbiters meeting/Round 1
3 September 15:00 Round 2
4 September 15:00 Round 3
5 September 15:00 Round 4
6 September 15:00/22:00 Round 5/Bermuda Party
7 September   Day Off
8 September 15:00 Round 6
9 September 15:00 Round 7
10 September 15:00 Round 8
11 September 15:00 Round 9
12 September 15:00 Round 10
13 September 11:00/19:30 Round 11/Closing Ceremony
14 September All day Departure day

Links

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Born in the US, he grew up in Paris, France, where he completed his Baccalaureat, and after college moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He had a peak rating of 2240 FIDE, and was a key designer of Chess Assistant 6. In 2010 he joined the ChessBase family as an editor and writer at ChessBase News. He is also a passionate photographer with work appearing in numerous publications.
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xrosstheh xrosstheh 9/2/2016 11:36
Rodwell Matoko had a good game game against Mamedyarov,.... He just missed one critical idea, otherwise, i feel he should have drawn....
Igor Freiberger Igor Freiberger 9/3/2016 01:01
Did I miss something or CB News completely forgot to mention the absence of Armenia? Geopolitics let one of the stronger teams out of Baku '16 and I think this deserves some news cover.
Derek McGill Derek McGill 9/3/2016 08:34
I counted 163 teams is this a record ?
Seryhaber Seryhaber 9/3/2016 12:38
Not a word about the absence of Armenia?
Don't you think that a chess Olympiad without Armenia cannot be a complete success and is a bit like a sausage without mustard?
Raymond Labelle Raymond Labelle 9/3/2016 05:12
Hi Igor,

There are these two paragraphs in the article of this page (right under the reproduction of Anish Giri's message).

"With such a massive tournament, one could easily go on and on, justifiably so, but of note also are the missing members. The most noteworthy is the absence of the entire team of Armenia, which for geopolitical reasons has refused to send a team, a true loss for chess as they won gold no fewer than three out of the last five Olympiads.

Israel is both there and not, and is unlikely to vie for any medals this time, despite having taken silver in 2008 and bronze in 2010 ahead of much higher rated rivals. For reasons that are related to issues between the government, the federation and the top players, none of the top players such as Gelfand or Sutovsky will be playing."
Raymond Labelle Raymond Labelle 9/3/2016 05:13
"I counted 163 teams is this a record ?" Derek McGill

I did not count myself, but Daniel King, in the video presented on this page, states that there are 175 teams and that it indeed is a record.
Igor Freiberger Igor Freiberger 9/4/2016 01:18
Raymond, this is a further addition. When I and Seryhaber wrote, there was no information about Armenian on the article. Good to see they revised it.
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